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xtrainer suspension set up

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got a new 2018 xtrainer, im 190 out of the shower, need advice setting up the suspension the front seems to deflect a bit. not sure what it is set up for stock or how to get it closer to  . .nice. im moderately paced  NE woods rider. open to some low budget mod ideas but would like to try adjusting it first. posted this on xtrainer FB page and just got a bucnh of ppl telling me to lay down 500 for new shocks. is there anyone with experience with this? thanks in advance.

jd

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Skip the Boano/whatever inserts and Call Aaron- 

 

All Moto Performance in Montana. 

 

If you want them RIGHT, and GOOD, you're going to spend at least $500 for revalve, and springs suited to your weight and riding style. 

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1 hour ago, redhurricane said:

Skip the Boano/whatever inserts and Call Aaron- 

 

All Moto Performance in Montana. 

 

If you want them RIGHT, and GOOD, you're going to spend at least $500 for revalve, and springs suited to your weight and riding style. 

A video of a well-suspended XT ought to be worth at least 1,000 words:

 

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Agreed springs and valving are the best solution. In the mean time you could replace the left fork leg's oil with 575ccs of 15 wt. This will slow down dampening to feel more like a dirt bike and the increase height will improve bottoming resistance.

In the rear end you need to set the race sag as close to 90mm as you can without eliminating all the static sag. I doubt you can get all the way to 90 but every little bit will help. The higher it rides the less harsh it will be.

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Posted (edited)

You don't come across as being very appreciative of that "bucnh of ppl" from the Xtrainer FB group, including Aaron at AMP Suspension, who took time out of their day to give you the same good advice you're now receiving here.  The link Aaron shared with you in your FB post clearly stated in technical detail why tinkering with the stock valving and clickers won't solve your problems.  Also, your geared-up rider weight is too heavy for any mainstream out-of-the-crate dirt bike, so it's pretty much impossible to "budget mod" your way around that one too.

That $500 suggestion for re-valving and re-springing both forks and the shock is a bargain in any reputable professional suspension shop. 

Edited by wwguy
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There's nothing wrong with being on a budget and doing some simple and easy set up ideas that have worked for many riders over the years. Not everyone is in a position to dole out more money after purchasing a bike, and suspension revalve is not necessary for all riders as it's completely dependant on your ridng situation. 

I rode the X Trainer with stock suspension several times last year and I'm around 220 lbs.

Yes, it's soft, but it's fine for easy pace riding.  

Obviously starting with the correct springs for your weight is essential. Make sure to calculate your weight with all of your ridng gear and hydration pack included. 

As mentioned, heavier weight fork oil is something many riders have used to assist in better dampening assistance along with increased oil height. 

These are inexpensive to try and the springs are essential anyway in order to let the stock suspension function properly without constantly blowing through the initial stroke. 

Hope this helps and enjoy your new X Trainer, they are a blast to ride! 

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You can spend the $$ on a revalve but you will still need to combat the wear issues. Unless things have changed my 2016 design had no real wear preventive coatings inside the fork. Material used seemed to be low quality resulting for me in damaged items. If you are looking for cheap fix go for the revalve, keeping the bike awhile go for a component replacement of the many options out there. When ready to sell bike replace stock items and sell or convert to next bike your upgraded suspension.

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I think it also depends on your riding style.  I have been riding trials bikes the last few years, so I like the lighter damping it has over the usual enduro bike. That makes it a lot easer to pre-load and ‘spring back up’ to hop over obstacles.  Of course, if you don’t ride like that it feels very strange.

I’m a little lighter, but when I had mine build BYOB, Beta USA strongly suggested different springs (of course I had it lowered an inch also).  So far they are working well for me. (I also have the K9 damper kit).   

For moderate and especially slow/‘technical’ type stuff- it works really well. I actively try not to ride faster anymore, I want to keep doing this as long as possible and want to cut my injury risk down.  So I am for precision and control. Perhaps a different focus, but quite rewarding in its own way.

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Just installing stiffer springs front and rear will make a world of difference. Yes technically, you should get a revalve, too, but frankly 90% of recreational riders would be perfectly happy with just the proper springs and probably a heavier oil.

If you are comfortable doing the work, a springs and oil are not too expensive and the job is pretty easy. If intend to have a good shop do it anyway, then you'll already be in it for a decent $ amount in parts and labor at that point, so it might be worth considering spending the extra clams to take it to the next level.

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1 hour ago, gullywasher said:

Yes technically, you should get a revalve, too, but frankly 90% of recreational riders would be perfectly happy with just the proper springs and probably a heavier oil.

IMHO 90% of the riders who sell their Xtrainers with low hours would disagree with you.

I'm definitely a recreational trail rider and at 54 years old I've never raced a dirt bike.  But I've ridden plenty of mountain and desert miles on quite a few of them, and the Xtrainer's stock suspension is a stinker compared to any other enduro bike I've ridden in the past decade or so.  If the stock suspension was the only option I'd have sold mine after the first season too.  Just my two bits as a member of the apparently rare 10 percenter club.

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1 hour ago, wwguy said:

IMHO 90% of the riders who sell their Xtrainers with low hours would disagree with you.

I have found that many in this group purchase the bike expecting it to be something it is not.

The X Trainer is a phenomenal bike for what it's designed for, beyond that, there's going to be disappointment.

Unfortunately, too many purchase the bike and expect it to perform on par with a more expensive, better equipped full suspension dirt bike when pushed hard. 

As a trail bike, the X Trainer is fantastic and very capable. Pushing it beyond being a trail bike to a fast paced woods bike, it's now outside of it's intended design and not capable of the same performance as a fully dedicated woods race oriented bike. 

Edited by firffighter
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2 minutes ago, wwguy said:

IMHO 90% of the riders who sell their Xtrainers with low hours would disagree with you.

I'm definitely a recreational trail rider and at 54 years old I've never raced a dirt bike.  But I've ridden plenty of mountain and desert miles on quite a few of them, and the Xtrainer's stock suspension is a stinker compared to any other enduro bike I've ridden in the past decade or so.  If the stock suspension was the only option I'd have sold mine after the first season too.  Just my two bits as a member of the apparently rare 10 percenter club.

Fair enough and a completely valid point.  I am myself am exclusively a recreational rider, and I am probably a member of that 10-percenter club too.  But I've also learned some very expensive lessons over the years about how much money one can throw at suspension for very marginal improvements. 

You need a good tech, and the rider needs to be realistic about his/her skill level, what kind of terrain they normally ride and, and how they like to ride it.  The result can be stunning if the tech can get the formula right.  I think I might have even gotten a little teary-eyed the first time I took out a truly well-tuned suspension job on a maiden ride.  But that was several suspension jobs/techs and thousands of dollars before I ever got to that point. 

I always just start with springs and experimenting with different oil weights because, at my weight, I know that will be a minimum requirement and will make a marked difference.  That is relatively easy and cheap, and like I said before, most people I've known are happy enough with that regardless of what kind of bike they have.  If I'm still not feeling the love, then I take the next plunge down the rabbit hole, which honestly at about 220 lbs geared up is where I usually end up going.  But I have a hard time suggesting to anyone to just go all out on a full job unless it is someone who already has had experience burning up money along the muddled path to suspension Nirvana.

Now, if the OP really does have access to a $500 suspension job as implied earlier in this thread, that is a really good deal, IMO - and probably worth a shot if he has the money to spend.

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Fair enough and a completely valid point.  I am myself am exclusively a recreational rider, and I am probably a member of that 10-percenter club too.  But I've also learned some very expensive lessons over the years about how much money one can throw at suspension for very marginal improvements. 
You need a good tech, and the rider needs to be realistic about his/her skill level, what kind of terrain they normally ride and, and how they like to ride it.  The result can be stunning if the tech can get the formula right.  I think I might have even gotten a little teary-eyed the first time I took out a truly well-tuned suspension job on a maiden ride.  But that was several suspension jobs/techs and thousands of dollars before I ever got to that point. 
I always just start with springs and experimenting with different oil weights because, at my weight, I know that will be a minimum requirement and will make a marked difference.  That is relatively easy and cheap, and like I said before, most people I've known are happy enough with that regardless of what kind of bike they have.  If I'm still not feeling the love, then I take the next plunge down the rabbit hole, which honestly at about 220 lbs geared up is where I usually end up going.  But I have a hard time suggesting to anyone to just go all out on a full job unless it is someone who already has had experience burning up money along the muddled path to suspension Nirvana.
Now, if the OP really does have access to a $500 suspension job as implied earlier in this thread, that is a really good deal, IMO - and probably worth a shot if he has the money to spend.


Just because over the years you’ve wasted funds trying to have your suspension dialed for your desires and was met with less than adequate results, guess what, join the crowd, lol!
These things happen and has happened to many of us. But that doesn’t mean that in “todays” world that it is as common anymore, unless you’re using Billy-Bob suspension services down the street.
The OP has posted on multiple sites, the same thing and was answered by a IMHO a sage suspension service/tuner, Aaron @ AMP.
There are opposites in this world, as I have absolute no issues in suggesting that frustrated riders have their bikes suspension dialed properly. No issue at all. As the worst thing people can do is ride an ill handling machine that will either bite them hard and possibly leave scars for life or become so dissatisfied that they get out of the sport entirely.
Again opposites, as most if not all of my friends that ride do what’s necessary to make their bikes handle properly first prior to any bling or wing-wams....
Safety in handling promotes confidence in riding, which promotes efficient and faster more adrenaline and smiles without hurting ones self, kind of a win win IMHO.......

Enjoy!
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It's funny, you mention the OP asking on several sites. It's so hard to tell what is genuine sometimes on these forums. Harder still trying to help someone not knowing their background and intentions for riding. 

Makes it hard to give input or advice as you just don't know what some riders are looking for or if they even know what they are looking for. 

I think most guys on here are pretty solid on giving a full picture and good options, without being to caught up on "you have to do it my way, or you're an idiot" approach. 

But, with suspension, along with so many other tuning options, it's never going to be one size fits all. Way too many different backgrounds and types of riding to say "this will work, this will not".

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23 minutes ago, firffighter said:

But, with suspension, along with so many other tuning options, it's never going to be one size fits all.

And that's what makes these discussions so much fun!

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1 hour ago, gullywasher said:

And that's what makes these discussions so much fun!

Very true! 

Also interesting how upset grown men get when you don't agree with their "expertise" 😳 

Although most of the time they just tell you there an expert with no real evidence demonstrating that they actually ride!

But hey, that's what makes these discussions fun too!

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On 5/13/2019 at 11:09 AM, paisan said:

got a new 2018 xtrainer, im 190 out of the shower, need advice setting up the suspension the front seems to deflect a bit. not sure what it is set up for stock or how to get it closer to  . .nice. im moderately paced  NE woods rider. open to some low budget mod ideas but would like to try adjusting it first. posted this on xtrainer FB page and just got a bucnh of ppl telling me to lay down 500 for new shocks. is there anyone with experience with this? thanks in advance.

jd

You could just slow down and enjoy the pace that suits the bike.

Or you could search this and other sites on suspension mods, buy a copy of Restakor and the Suspension Bible, study for a few months, invest in the few but necessary tools, and then rip into the Olles on your own. Here's a thread that may help:

Or you could ride the XT until you are clear on its limitations and your intentions, and invest with someone who has already done the homework (his name has been mentioned more than once on this thread).

I do hope you find a way to fully enjoy your XT.

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15 hours ago, firffighter said:

Very true! 

Also interesting how upset grown men get when you don't agree with their "expertise" 😳 

Although most of the time they just tell you there an expert with no real evidence demonstrating that they actually ride!

But hey, that's what makes these discussions fun too!

So an expert is someone that rides?? I know several on here that ride but never adjust their clickers from the showroom settings. Are they experts too??

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