Jump to content
Chris259

Can I fix this with jb weld or epoxy? chain broke off the case saver and slashed the case a little

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, John Painter said:

Yes they work great, thou I use the Harbor Freight https://www.harborfreight.com/8-piece-low-temperature-aluminum-welding-rods-44810.html version, but the surface must be clean and of course you need to grind a little around the areas you use the rods.

 

I have done some great repairs and built a custom aluminum combo to really get the surface hot enough for an excellent bond.

 

That said you need to practice a bit because the trick is to make sure the surface you’re working on is hot enough to melt the rods, it’s like brazing, you don’t melt the rods with your torch, won’t work if you do. emoji1303.png

 

Same as soldering...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mike3025E said:

Pulled a transmission and engine flywheel housing, from a freightliner truck and a detroit 60 series engine,the right top corner of block was broken off,broke right in the center of the flywheel housing mounting hole and right beside the oil drain gally.cleaned up the parts,applied the belzona and let it sit overnite and sanded next morning.the torque on the flywheel housing is 75 ftlbs and i torqued that bolt and it torqued to spec and no oil leakcustomer wanted to try since he couldnt afford a new block and it worked really good

This?  https://www.belzona.com/en/products/1000/1111.aspx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used JB weld to fix a spot on my case just like that and it’s seriously been like 5 years and zero issues from it. Just do a neat job so it actually looks okay.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, MVI said:

Weld it.

With the cases intact, how would you weld that. Asking for a friend. Gas, wire and pre or post heat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, RichBaker said:

Same as soldering...

Ya but you have to have clean metal both sides. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gotta have the right friends, and shop owner. Ken was a welder in a nuke plant in a previous life... And another buddy was almost as good.
Although modern formulations of epoxy are pretty good, surface prep is extremely important for good results. JB is ok, to get me out of the dez. It gets cleaned off and welded, later.
Nuclear plant welders are tig/stainless specialists. As a 6g smaw pipe welder, which is the top of the stick pyramid, nothing but respect for that gummy stainless gooey mess those guys weld! If you can weld stainless you can weld aluminum....but, being aluminum there are options out there that work on a non-stressed area like that. Is it a 4 stroke or a 2 stroke? If 4, there may be some pressure right there from the crankcase. 2 stroke? Put some paper towels in there and ride.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone tried the durafix rods with a propane torch?
 
Yes. And yes they work. Stronger bond then you would believe, much like solder. I actually thought of that as soon as i saw the picture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cleaning is the main issue with welding aluminum, knowing when it's clean enough is key and how to clean it. If it's not clean enough you will make it worse!
No, I've never used a durafix stick, pretty impressive but look how clean the aluminum surface is in the video
 
Using mold cleaner from an injection shop and good clean scotchbrite can get it clean enough. That stuff almost seems to dry the metal out, certainly breaks oil and sludge down in very short oder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That rod is designed for pure filler. Your cases are cast and wont want to weld cleanly. Two part epoxy is only way to go unless you take cover off and clean both sides. When you weld metal it pulls imperfections from the other side so youd have to have both sides clean.
The aluminum sticks with propane dont penetrate or draw, they are about perfect for case cracks and holes for these bikes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes they work great, thou I use the Harbor Freight https://www.harborfreight.com/8-piece-low-temperature-aluminum-welding-rods-44810.html version, but the surface must be clean and of course you need to grind a little around the areas you use the rods.  
I have done some great repairs and built a custom aluminum combo to really get the surface hot enough for an excellent bond.
 
That said you need to practice a bit because the trick is to make sure the surface you’re working on is hot enough to melt the rods, it’s like brazing, you don’t melt the rods with your torch, won’t work if you do.
 
Same results here. More time then jb but much more betterer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/4/2019 at 5:58 AM, elrontx said:

yes you can. do what mikea 2 said. let it dry for a day or 2, preferably outside. I fixed holes like that before with jb weld. buy the one you have to mix, not the premixed one.

Yep, Mike is right on.  JB weld will fix this if you clean it well first and let it cure fully. You can speed up the curing with a heat gun if you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Job weld should be good, I bought a Mercedes Sprinter 3 years ago that had a quarter size hole in the oil pan and I JB welded a piece of aluminum on top of the hole and it is still perfect and not leaking.

97C2C8DA-1D8D-422A-90EE-6744A8BB975F.jpeg

5F461B99-A859-4207-A214-42D6A9FB8ADB.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jb weld would work just fine for a quick fix and would possibly last a very long time if done well

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is inside the broken area of the case? Tig is great, but the heat will cause distortion of the surrounding area!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used JB weld in the past. It held up great, but allowed an oil leak. It is not as permanent as a weld no matter what anyone tells you. It does not become part of the metal. Any professional welder can do it. I'm no pro and I'm able to. There are alternatives available online such as aluminum rods for brazing with a simple plumbing torch. There are videos on YouTube of it's use and it is a much better alternative to having it welded than JB Weld.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you do go with JB, prep is key just as with welding. Make the repair larger than the damage. Don't be afraid to put some pretty good gouges around so the JB will have something to bite into. I have fixed cracks but not holes. JB is a little runny at first so a little at a time. Adding to a semi cured base should keep too much from running inside. It WILL sag so don't just slap it on and walk away. GL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the Durafix rod is great stuff for aluminum repairs. The one thing you must have is a stainless steel wire brush. Your ordinary wire brush simply will not do. To prep the metal, use a Stainless Steel wire brush to clean it. Acetone is a good degreaser/cleaner, but you need to knock the oxides off with that Stainless Steel brush!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried those rods on some old busted radiators and could not get the material hot enough to melt the rod, will a propane torch really get aluminum over 700 degrees? Maybe I don’t have the right kind of tip or something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×