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Looking back on all my upgrades, is the DRZ worth it?

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1 hour ago, ktmenvy said:

Agreed. The ACT gears are different but not better for everyone (e.g., me). I like the stack and ACT ratios about the same.

And I agree that many riders – including those that spend some time in the dirt – would benefit from a higher final ratio if they must ride freeways to get to the dirt. Dirt performance on the trails that I ride would not be seriously compromised.

For the quantitatively minded rider, see the graphic.

 

drz wide ratio gearing vs stock.png

some interesting charts for sure.  First chart's act gearing would be interesting to try w/ supermoto, but would need a lot more power over stock form.  Second chart's act gearing would be interesting to try for dual sport, but those ratios get pretty spacey.  ACT's gears really don't solve the fundamental problem of no 6th cog.  I would bet they'd be most useful for street use with a lot more power over stock--you'd prob need it to pull thru those wide spacey ratios. 

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Posted (edited)

Forced myself to read this entire thread. I've read that BMW's have more warranty claims per bike than any other brand currently. The stated reason for this is because they shipped most of their production to China. Sound familiar? BMW's from the '70s and '80s were all made in Germany, had simplicity, took 45 minutes to adjust valves, and 10 minutes to change main jets on a trip. They didn't have all the unnecessary electronic BS of today and were as reliable as the sunrise.

Compare this to Moto Guzzi. Still made in Italy, great attention to detail, high quality, easy to work on, beautiful, rare, and very reliable. I've had an unfulfilled fetish for Guzzis for years. The new V85 Adventure may just be the hook that catches me.

Keep the DRZ, put a lowering link in the rear suspension, slide the forks up in the triple clamps for proper geometry, get the lowest seat possible, and change the sprockets for better highway cruising. Leave the girlfriend at home till she accepts riding the DRZ while you explore on a V85.

For a bike with better suspension consider the new Yamaha Tenere 700.

Edited by Old Fart Syndrome

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29 minutes ago, Old Fart Syndrome said:

Forced myself to read this entire thread. I've read that BMW's have more warranty claims per bike than any other brand currently. The stated reason for this is because they shipped most of their production to China. Sound familiar? BMW's from the '70s and '80s were all made in Germany, had simplicity, took 45 minutes to adjust valves, and 10 minutes to change main jets on a trip. They didn't have all the unnecessary electronic BS of today and were as reliable as the sunrise.

Compare this to Moto Guzzi. Still made in Italy, great attention to detail, high quality, easy to work on, beautiful, rare, and very reliable. I've had an unfulfilled fetish for Guzzis for years. The new V85 Adventure may just be the hook that catches me.

Keep the DRZ, put a lowering link in the rear suspension, slide the forks up in the triple clamps for proper geometry, get the lowest seat possible, and change the sprockets for better highway cruising. Leave the girlfriend at home till she accepts riding the DRZ while you explore on a V85.

For a bike with better suspension consider the new Yamaha Tenere 700.

  Has anybody actually seen a Tenere 700?

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33 minutes ago, Barry Ries said:

  Has anybody actually seen a Tenere 700?

Not in the US. They're showing up in Europe now. And I've started by Tenere fund for when they do arrive here.

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53 minutes ago, ptgarcia said:

Not in the US. They're showing up in Europe now. And I've started by Tenere fund for when they do arrive here.

  That is good news.      I'm really happy with my F800GS for now but the 700 Tenere looks like it could be a really nice bike.    I just can't get used to that weird gas tank on the KTM 790.

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2 minutes ago, Barry Ries said:

  That is good news.      I'm really happy with my F800GS for now but the 700 Tenere looks like it could be a really nice bike.    I just can't get used to that weird gas tank on the KTM 790.

On Father's Day I went to Chaparral and sat on their 790 Adventure (not the R, they didn't have any) and didn't like it as much as I thought. It's more expensive and more "feature" rich than I want, anyway. I'm hoping I like the Yamaha as much as I think I will.

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1 hour ago, Barry Ries said:

  Has anybody actually seen a Tenere 700?

So far, only this guy, but it took a bit of doing.

image.png.000b878a9afcb8c80e57453d8fa9411a.png

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, ptgarcia said:

On Father's Day I went to Chaparral and sat on their 790 Adventure (not the R, they didn't have any) and didn't like it as much as I thought. It's more expensive and more "feature" rich than I want, anyway. I'm hoping I like the Yamaha as much as I think I will.

  Are you aspiring to keep the DRZ and get the Tenere 700?  That will be a sweet pair of bikes to have in the garage.  I love having the F800Gs and the DRZ400S.  Twins are just so much better for long trips, but they can get heavy when the going gets tough.  

Edited by Barry Ries
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17 minutes ago, Barry Ries said:

  Are you aspiring to keep the DRZ and get the Tenere 700?  That will be a sweet pair of bikes to have in the garage.  I love having the F800Gs and the DRZ400S.  Twins are just so much better for long trips, but they can get heavy when the going gets tough.  

I am, if I can swing it. I think it will be a great combo, too.

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Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, ptgarcia said:

3c2cebc6-5281-42a2-a8e0-0fae510b5774-jpe

you bugger!!! how did you manage that?

We expect a full ride report, once you give it a good shake down.

Edited by bucket list
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20 minutes ago, bucket list said:

you bugger!!! how did you manage that?

We expect a full ride report, once you give it a good shake down.

Oh how I wish that was mine but it's not. That belongs to some lucky bastard in Europe. It's the first picture I've seen of a production bike in the hands of a regular Joe.

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On 7/18/2019 at 12:45 PM, ptgarcia said:

Oh how I wish that was mine but it's not. That belongs to some lucky bastard in Europe. It's the first picture I've seen of a production bike in the hands of a regular Joe.

  Still, the fact that they are being delivered to somebody is good news.

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Posted (edited)
On 7/16/2019 at 12:29 PM, Old Fart Syndrome said:

Forced myself to read this entire thread. I've read that BMW's have more warranty claims per bike than any other brand currently. The stated reason for this is because they shipped most of their production to China. Sound familiar? BMW's from the '70s and '80s were all made in Germany, had simplicity, took 45 minutes to adjust valves, and 10 minutes to change main jets on a trip. They didn't have all the unnecessary electronic BS of today and were as reliable as the sunrise.
 

Even the German bikes have had plenty of reliability problems and warranty claims.  I think there's a lot more to do with the number of warranty claims than country of production and even complexity (the more complex a bike is the lower the reliability; and BMW across the board has nothing but highly complex bikes).  BMWs also tend to get ridden and ridden a lot (like 2 Iron Butts in 24hrs or how about 1,000 miles a day for 20 days), not uncommon to see 100K miles on them (especially on the boxers and K bikes). There is definitely some inherent design flaws on some of the BMW models, but number of claims per bike instead of rate of claims per mile is not a totally fair comparison.  Honda and Yamaha build arguably the most reliable bikes, but they also have lots of bikes that are fairly simple bikes or models that won't get ridden many miles (e.g. race reps).   BMW sells more R1200GS than any other model and guys that shell out that kind of money for an ugly motorcycle are going to be riding it and not parking it in the garage and looking at it or riding it for 20mins because that's all they can tolerate (R6?)   Honestly I've put a lot of miles on BMWs and the only show stopper for me in over a decade of riding them and 10s of thousands of miles, was I had sidestand safety switch fail on me on a rental bike which just happen to be one of them Chinese G650s.  

It's a tough balancing act, the latest and greatest bikes are a dream to ride compared to the bikes of the 70s and 80s; but they give have computers and complex electronics that can't be easily field repaid.  We love to remember how "good" the bikes were back then from a simplicity standpoint but remember the braking and suspension of that era? no thanks.  

Edited by Greg Huston

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