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Tubeless setup questions

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I had a great race sunday until tragedy struck with another flat. There is nothing worse then not finishing a race you had the best laps in. So:

1- if i went tubeless will i get a ton of sidewall flex and will it make the weird sensation of stepping out on you like when you get a flat?

2- without air im assuming the tire doesmt bounce, what will i need to do to compensate? Just quicker rebound or does it tend to affect everything?

3- how does the bead seat if i cant pump 30psi into it?

4- how long will they last and what happens at the breaking point?

5- do they come in varying firmness or one size fits all?

6- does it wear corner tread more then if the tire was tubed?

7- will the tire do that pulsing thing like when you hit a 70ft double with a flat and realize in the air the rear is pulsing because the bead is off and hopefully we make it out of this alive first, then without hurting the rim second?

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One thing to keep in mind is that with Tubliss you can still get flat tires. I carry plugs and an inflator, quicker than fixing a tube by a long way, but not flat-proof. I also use tire sealant either Stans or Slim.

The mousse are flat-proof but are a PIA to mount and unmount they also are size dependant I. E. for different size tires different size mousse, so changing tires can mean that you have to get a different mousse.  You will want a special tire mounting stand to use the mousse as well.

Just FYI

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The tubliss thing is meant to get you back to the truck, not race able. If you think you get a bunch of flats now just wait until you start running tubliss! 

Seems natural progression to go from hd tubes to tubliss to mousse... everyone goes mousse eventually in flat prone areas. I fought the tubliss, tried to make it work, tried many different tires, eventually gave up.. It is more flat prone than tubes because only the tire needs punctured..

mousse can get some wobble in the air when it’s worn, my advice is just skip the tubliss crap and run extra heavy duty Bridgestone tube for the track or bibs offroad. The Bridgestone tubes are heavier than mousse fwiw..

Edited by The Creature
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5 hours ago, raymo2.0 said:

One thing to keep in mind is that with Tubliss you can still get flat tires. I carry plugs and an inflator, quicker than fixing a tube by a long way, but not flat-proof. I also use tire sealant either Stans or Slim.

The mousse are flat-proof but are a PIA to mount and unmount they also are size dependant I. E. for different size tires different size mousse, so changing tires can mean that you have to get a different mousse.  You will want a special tire mounting stand to use the mousse as well.

Just FYI

I recommend if using tubliss to find a good matching tire that has a stiff sidewall that can run at zero psi. that way you can just ride out any flat in the main chamber if racing or just don't want to deal with carrying a pump and plugs. Of course that is easier said than done on the front 🙂

I'm running tubliss front and rear for about 2 years now and haven't had any flats or issues, but i'll probably move to a moose in the front since I don't run it that low anymore then stick with the shinko 525 in the rear. Normally run it at 3-5 psi but it's ok at zero to finish a race at least when its fairly new 

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Seems to me that mousse would be the best compromise for racing.  IMO tubliss shines when you need the ability to adjust air pressures, I doubt that makes any sense for racing.

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7 minutes ago, braindead0 said:

Seems to me that mousse would be the best compromise for racing.  IMO tubliss shines when you need the ability to adjust air pressures, I doubt that makes any sense for racing.

Think it depends on the type of racing and what level you are at. I've used the same tubliss for 2 years on 2 different bikes so really getting a good return on the investment, then I really like the low pressure in the rear where if you ran a mousse that soft your rims would get destroyed pretty fast. 

If your stuff only has to last one race you have a lot more options. Plus if I don't finish a race its not that big a deal i just go home, not going to lose my lively hood 

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The bead of the tire seats when you inflate the inner bladder. I just use a walmart bicycle tire pump to inflate the inner liner and the tire. Lube the tire up good with sealant when installing.  I've been pretty happy with it so far, and after getting the hang of it, tire changes are easier imo. 

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5 hours ago, Dirtstache 556 said:

I recommend if using tubliss to find a good matching tire that has a stiff sidewall that can run at zero psi. that way you can just ride out any flat in the main chamber if racing or just don't want to deal with carrying a pump and plugs. 

Finally. I was so close to losing all hope. I 100% agree. Because you are 100% correct.

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Seems natural progression to go from hd tubes to tubliss to mousse... everyone goes mousse eventually in flat prone areas. I fought the tubliss, tried to make it work, tried many different tires, eventually gave up..


So true!!! I also did all of this. Finally I’m running mousse and wish I had done it years ago. Between 2 bikes I bet I’ve thrown $1000 away with popped tubes (yes, even ultra extreme super extra mega heavy duty), failed tubliss systems and damaged tires from riding on flats.
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When Tubliss came out, most tires had stiffer side was, you could ride with zero psi with some tires no problem at all. Tires have changed since then, most have a much softer side wall. Matching Tubliss to the right tire is the most Important part if you want to be able to use it to It's full potential. Unfortunately, the tire options that work really well with Tubliss are becoming less and less.

 

 

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18 minutes ago, cdf450 said:

 


So true!!! I also did all of this. Finally I’m running mousse and wish I had done it years ago. Between 2 bikes I bet I’ve thrown $1000 away with popped tubes (yes, even ultra extreme super extra mega heavy duty), failed tubliss systems and damaged tires from riding on flats.

 

Im half way there now.  Mousse up front and tubliss in rear.  Motoz for thick sidewalls.

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9 minutes ago, Drop-Bear said:

Unfortunately, the tire options that work really well with Tubliss are becoming less and less

 

Hmm, what makes you say that? It seems to me that all of these modern "hybrid" tires, with stiff sidewalls and supple crowns, would be ideal.

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1 minute ago, ktmenvy said:

Hmm, what makes you say that? It seems to me that all of these modern "hybrid" tires, with stiff sidewalls and supple crowns, would be ideal.

I can't say I've tried any Hybrid tires. Unless you'd class a Golden Tire GT333 in that class.

One example of what I mean is. I loved the S/10's and M3's. They were fine to run with zero PSI. Not Ideal, but you didn't have to stop and hold up a ride if you got a flat. The new StarCross 5's are much different. You can not ride with zero PSI in those.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Drop-Bear said:

I can't say I've tried any Hybrid tires. Unless you'd class a Golden Tire GT333 in that class.

One example of what I mean is. I loved the S/10's and M3's. They were fine to run with zero PSI. Not Ideal, but you didn't have to stop and hold up a ride if you got a flat. The new StarCross 5's are much different. You can not ride with zero PSI in those.

1

OK, got it. I don't think the GT333 is a hybrid but I'm not sure.

Examples of hybrids include the Shinko 505 Cheater, several Motoz's, the MT43 (perhaps the first?), and the Equilibrium. The market is swimming with them these days, perhaps because of the popularity of (hard) enduro.

I guess that MX tires typically have more flexible (and shorter) sidewalls.

I'm certainly no expert but have owned the 505 and MT43.

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Thanks a lot! After reading both it looks like the tubliss is a better option then a mousse. I appreciate the link!


If you are concerned about losing a race because of a flat then mousses are the only choice. I don’t race very often but run mousses because they don’t go flat. I’ve had enough rides ruined by flats, and have wrecked a couple tires riding them back flat. And nope, I don’t carry stuff to fix a flat. My buddies rear tubliss went flat this past weekend, luckily we found a guy with a pump he could borrow, and luckily it ended up being the valve core just had some dirt in it, even though it was capped. Just not worth the hassle to me.
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