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PW80 Barn Find

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My son and I are newbies to bikes, so we are probably going to ask some silly questions, so apologies in advance.

Our kind neighbor has just given my son a 1999 PW80 that has been left outside next to a shed for quite a while. Our plan is to get going, then tackle the cosmetics.

Our first concern is the engine may be seized. The bike does not have a carby fitted so I guess that could have caused some exposure to the element. We live in Sydney Australia, so our climate is very dry, the bike has a little bit of surface rust in parts, but nothing much.

Anyway we took the spark plug out and sprayed in some WD-40 lubricant, let it sit for a while and put the bike in third and tried to wheel it forward, the wheel remained locked, we tried all gears, in neutral it rolls freely. We then tried to push down the kick start, no luck.

What do you recon? Should we start pulling it apart?

And the carby, do we try buy an original, or are the after market ones okay?

Thanks very much.

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IMG_0024.thumb.JPG.c966d2a98649238a29af2a6e73a94ce4.JPG

I rebuilt a 1995 PW80 earlier this year for my daughter, but just sold it last week since my daughter enjoys 4-wheelers more.

Yes start pulling it apart. There’s a good chance since the carb wasn’t installed that water at somepoint May have got down into the bottom end. If so you’ll need to most likely split the cases and do a new bottom end.

The only way to tell is by pull the top end off and inspect everything.

Check for rust in the bottom end. If miraculously its rust free and the bearings don’t have up and down play you should be okay.

Go back to the top end and look at your cylinder for any issues. If no grooves or gauges it should be reusable.

I would get a new piston and ring, wrist pin and needle bearing regardless.

Regarding a carburetor I’d get OEM. Mine came with a cheap knockoff. I couldn’t find jets that would fit it and it wouldn’t run with the jets that were in it.

I replaced it with an OEM carb. The knockoffs usually have odd jets that are difficult to impossible to find and make jetting difficult to impossible.

Fun little bike. Very forgiving for new riders.

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By the way they are very simple motorcycle to work on.
Remove the gas tank and pipe. Remove 4 nuts and the head and cylinder can slide right off.
Again if the bottom end is okay and isn’t rusted and seized up, I would flush out using diesel fuel and then add some 2-stroke oil to the bearings before doing the top end rebuild.

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Thank you so much, this gives us the confidence to get stuck into. 

The head has come off with some convincing, the piston is still pretty solid. So believe my next steps are to remove the engine from the bike frame and open up the bottom end.

We'll get some photo's together.

Cheers

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I live in Sydney and would be able to help you out. Give me a call on 0405-299-962 thanks Sam

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Thanks Sam, hopefully an offer you will not regret, as I said we are new to bikes:). But seriously once we have it apart some help in identifying the next steps, parts that need replacing etc... will be really helpful. We live in Arcadia, but certainly with help on offer we'd bundle up the pieces and bring them to you.

 

Other aspects we'll be looking at is respraying the frame, it has as you would expect scratches, surface rust from being outside. For the frame I assume a regular black gloss, or do people use a heat resistant paint?

We'd also be looking to pain the front forks and handle bars. Maybe getting a bit particular, is specific paint colour broadly known? As you may have gathered I do like to keep things original.

 

Bike - topend removed.jpg

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Don't paint the front forks . Use a scotch Brite or steel wool on the lowers to clean them up but leave the upper stanchions tubes alone . The  bushings and the fork seals will not work with paint on the tubes . I rebuilt a Suzuki ds80 earlier this year in similar condition and had about $750 (us) in it . Sold it for $900 . No machine shops in town anymore so I sent the jug off to a guy on eBay to get bored . That's alot of labor ( probably 30 hours )  for a $150 profit . You will will probably have about that much in your rebuild also , so keep that in mind ..

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We’ll give the steel wool a try, though we still have scratches that it would be nice to cover with some fresh paint, we would certainly avoid touching the tubing.

Maybe some good news on the bottom end after taking the motor out. We sprayed in some more WD-40 and rotated the clutch back and forth, it then free’d up completely. 

I will take the advice and give it a clean out with diesel then drop in some two stroke oil.

There is a small amount of surface  rust close to where the head bolts on. Are we mad to just try clean that up and then just do the top end rebuild?

 

6A22D550-F5EF-4C71-B304-EF726D3FA4AC.png

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