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Tire changing setup for the motorhome.

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Buying tires and getting them installed when you're in the middle of no-where is proving to be quite the PITA.  Plus I go through more rubber than a whore house running a BOGOF sale. 👯‍♀️

Time for me to man up and start to change my own freaking tires after all these years.

I want something that can change street or dirt tires.  Also want to be able to balance tires since all my bikes are plated.

It's gotta work well with the Tubliss tire system.

How does this list look?  It's a lot of extra crap to tote along, so if anyone has ideas for something more suitable, I'm all ears.  But no, I don't want to use a 5 gal bucket to change tires.

Rabaconda

https://www.amazon.com/Rabaconda-Motorcycle-Tire-Changer-Machine/dp/B00N3C9J54/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=rabaconda&qid=1573249838&s=automotive&sr=1-1

Rabaconda Levers

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N3C9TGI/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=A1I92ST234I0W1&psc=1

Tusk Wheel balancer

https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/parts/tusk-motorcycle-wheel-balancing-and-truing-stand-p

Weights

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005FYTPPW/ref=dp_cerb_2

Tire mounting lube???  Not sure what to get?

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Honestly, a 5 gal bucket and some good tire irons are all that you really need. That and a nice roll-stool in the garage so you aren't on your knees. Just use a spray bottle of soapy water for lube. These simple tools are all i have needed in over 20 years of changing my own tires. Takes me about 30 min per tire, from wheel on bike to wheel back on bike.

I wouldn't want to tote all that extra crap along with me in my RV, though, I do usually bring a spare set of wheels on my multi-day trips so that I can just swap wheels instead of fixing a flat out in the middle of nowhere.

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Ya personally I use a milk crate on some old carpet and an adjustable stool and all are cheap and easy to carry in a motor home.

20190720_151359.jpg.0a5d4791994ee045c7b5107e9110b22c.jpg

20190720_154850.jpg.9b1b799d49b314fb515e8283f9096d63.jpg

Not getting into how I change my tires with tubes and no idea about balancing but the irons in the link look nice but I find 2 Motion Pro irons and a spoon work fine but again $$$ is not an issue go with the 5 irons :)

20160615_173955.thumb.jpg.3307b5febce9cb32387eeaa7df48fbc7.jpg

With that said, you've got room in the motor home to carry a tire changer etc so if $$$ is not an issue go with works.

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We're retired now, so we go for pretty long trips. I'm imagining I'll be going through 6-8 tires a trip. Even when we're home I'd be great to do my own tires.  So far I'm 700 miles into this trip on my 701 and my rear tire was toast about 200 miles ago.  My front is probably going to last another 3-500 miles.  A small tip over has resulted in a broken rear brake pedal, indicator and a messed up clutch cover.  I was hoping to get away with minimal maintenance and just a few tires changes (paying a shop) but it appears that was just a fantasy. 

Back to tires... I tried using a couple of spoons and a bucket many years ago and it didn't end well lol.  Just looking for something that is quick and easy.  I have the $/space for the setup mention above, but if there's something functionally equivalent that packs up smaller, I'm all ears.  Bike and motor home maintenance are really cutting into my riding and drinking/campfire time lol. 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, redhurricane said:

Thanks, I will check out the Baja system.  Certainly a lot smaller!  I'd read street price for the Rabaconda was pretty close to the moose racing knock off.  Not sure if it's worth the extra cash though.

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13 minutes ago, Colorado^ said:

Back to tires... I tried using a couple of spoons and a bucket many years ago and it didn't end well lol.  Just looking for something that is quick and easy.  I have the $/space for the setup mention above, but if there's something functionally equivalent that packs up smaller, I'm all ears.  Bike and motor home maintenance are really cutting into my riding and drinking/campfire time lol. 

 

 

Yeah,

about two spooons.

 

you need 3.

 

look for the three spoon method., learn it, live it, and repeat as needed.

 

last.

small bites when removing or replacing. Don’t get greedy with the spoons.

 

and soapy water if you want to be fancy.

if I can change a flat in the dark in a mexican race on the side of a trail out of tools in my hip pack I am sure you got this.

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I use a Rabaconda.  I'm 60, and don't like getting on the ground and fighting tires, except when I have to on the trails.

The Rabaconda packs pretty small, but then sets up into a pretty good changer.  I bought 5 of their spoons, and they are the trick.  Very easy to get tires on and off.  I've used it with Tubliss, mousse inserts and tubes.  Works great, and was well worth the costs for me.  Got mine from "jeff aka bolt" on this site.

I carry one of the Baja tools on the trail with me on longer trips.  Makes easy work of getting that last 10" of bead.  Long irons are a must on the trail.

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4 hours ago, SloChicken said:

Yeah,

about two spooons.

 

you need 3.

 

look for the three spoon method., learn it, live it, and repeat as needed.

 

last.

small bites when removing or replacing. Don’t get greedy with the spoons.

 

and soapy water if you want to be fancy.

if I can change a flat in the dark in a mexican race on the side of a trail out of tools in my hip pack I am sure you got this.

I think you over estimate me lol.  I'm sure with enough practice I could get it down.  Most repairs and maintenance I take on myself, but for some reason I've never put in the time to learn tire changes.  With tubliss I just don't have to deal with flats out on the trails.

 

 

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1 hour ago, markbfe501 said:

I use a Rabaconda.  I'm 60, and don't like getting on the ground and fighting tires, except when I have to on the trails.

The Rabaconda packs pretty small, but then sets up into a pretty good changer.  I bought 5 of their spoons, and they are the trick.  Very easy to get tires on and off.  I've used it with Tubliss, mousse inserts and tubes.  Works great, and was well worth the costs for me.  Got mine from "jeff aka bolt" on this site.

I carry one of the Baja tools on the trail with me on longer trips.  Makes easy work of getting that last 10" of bead.  Long irons are a must on the trail.

My back hurts all the time and I'm looking for a solution that isn't going to make it worse.  With the 701 I carry a 12v compressor and tire plugs on the trails now-a-days.  Before that on my 300 I've had 8 years of riding and always been able to make it back when i get a flat, with no tire changing tools/tube. 

I'm sure not carrying a tube and tools to change a tire out on the trail will bite me one day, but so far so good.

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3 hours ago, markbfe501 said:

I use a Rabaconda.  I'm 60, and don't like getting on the ground and fighting tires, except when I have to on the trails.

The Rabaconda packs pretty small, but then sets up into a pretty good changer.  I bought 5 of their spoons, and they are the trick.  Very easy to get tires on and off.  I've used it with Tubliss, mousse inserts and tubes.  Works great, and was well worth the costs for me.  Got mine from "jeff aka bolt" on this site.

I carry one of the Baja tools on the trail with me on longer trips.  Makes easy work of getting that last 10" of bead.  Long irons are a must on the trail.

I carry a 21" Hd tube and two 6" tire irons. Gets the job done. Tube change is less than 10 min. 

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2 hours ago, Colorado^ said:

I think you over estimate me lol.  I'm sure with enough practice I could get it down.  Most repairs and maintenance I take on myself, but for some reason I've never put in the time to learn tire changes.  With tubliss I just don't have to deal with flats out on the trails.

 

 

I also ride tubeliss. 

I just blasted two rims topped out in a large wash I know well. 

Well, except for this one rock about a foot tall, squared off, and immovable as it is stuck in the bed.

I freakin’ launched at 80-90mph. My eyes only really keep up to 60 or so, so it is kind of a bad beat for me these days. Lol.

at any rate, rims flat spotted and well dinged. Time for a new hoops.

But,

no flat tire 😂

i run 7hp front snd rear on 90/100 goldentyre fatty front and a 120/18 desert IT out back.

Edited by SloChicken

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11 hours ago, Colorado^ said:

My back hurts all the time and I'm looking for a solution that isn't going to make it worse.  With the 701 I carry a 12v compressor and tire plugs on the trails now-a-days.  Before that on my 300 I've had 8 years of riding and always been able to make it back when i get a flat, with no tire changing tools/tube. 

I'm sure not carrying a tube and tools to change a tire out on the trail will bite me one day, but so far so good.

My first option (depends on how close to the trailhead) is to use large zip-ties to hold things together long enough to get back to the truck.  If a multi-day ride, or a long ways away, gotta fix it.  On longer rides, I also carry a spare tube, a patch kit (for the inevitable tube pinch), a small canister of talcum powder, an a small 12V pump.

When I go out to Colorado/Utah, I've run Tubliss, and a Tubliss/Mousse combo.  Have had to plug a tire with Tubliss twice.  Definitely an easy fix.  I carried a Tubliss tube just in case.  To carry a standard tube as a backup to Tubliss, don't forget also to carry a rimlock.

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12 hours ago, SloChicken said:

I also ride tubeliss. 

I just blasted two rims topped out in a large wash I know well. 

Well, except for this one rock about a foot tall, squared off, and immovable as it is stuck in the bed.

I freakin’ launched at 80-90mph. My eyes only really keep up to 60 or so, so it is kind of a bad beat for me these days. Lol.

at any rate, rims flat spotted and well dinged. Time for a new hoops.

But,

no flat tire 😂

i run 7hp front snd rear on 90/100 goldentyre fatty front and a 120/18 desert IT out back.

Wow, that's crazy.  I can't imagine hitting something that size at that speed.  I'm not used to riding sand or the desert in general and I'm quickly finding out it has it's own set of hazards.

Hope you weren't hurt!  Amazing that the tire still had air!

 

 

Edited by Colorado^
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2 hours ago, markbfe501 said:

My first option (depends on how close to the trailhead) is to use large zip-ties to hold things together long enough to get back to the truck.  If a multi-day ride, or a long ways away, gotta fix it.  On longer rides, I also carry a spare tube, a patch kit (for the inevitable tube pinch), a small canister of talcum powder, an a small 12V pump.

When I go out to Colorado/Utah, I've run Tubliss, and a Tubliss/Mousse combo.  Have had to plug a tire with Tubliss twice.  Definitely an easy fix.  I carried a Tubliss tube just in case.  To carry a standard tube as a backup to Tubliss, don't forget also to carry a rimlock.

Hopefully after doing tires myself, I'll feel more comfortable tackling a trail side repair.  On the dirt bikes, I've been lucky so far, only one flat with a tube that I had to ride out on (about 15 miles).  Many tubliss flats, both front and rear, I was able to ride out on with 0 psi.  Although riding 0 psi did destroy one Kenda rear tire. 

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33 minutes ago, Colorado^ said:

Wow, that's crazy.  I can't imagine hitting something that size at that speed.  I'm not used to riding sand or the desert in general and I'm quickly finding out it has it's own set of hazards.

Hope you weren't hurt!  Amazing that the tire still had air!

 

 

Ha, no all is good. 

 

Watch this guy for good entertainment on willful whiskey throttle and determination.

he is hitting all kinds of stuff bit keeps pointed.

True grit.

 

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24 minutes ago, Colorado^ said:

Hopefully after doing tires myself, I'll feel more comfortable tackling a trail side repair.  On the dirt bikes, I've been lucky so far, only one flat with a tube that I had to ride out on (about 15 miles).  Many tubliss flats, both front and rear, I was able to ride out on with 0 psi.  Although riding 0 psi did destroy one Kenda rear tire. 

Riding on flats is standard in racing, happens all the time.

a good friend was flatting basically every race and finishing (wins/podiums) on them

If there is time, changing makes sense, but riding a flat works well enough, given you have a good rim lock of some sort often the tire won’t do great, but they are expendables. Usu the rim hangs in there well.

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25 minutes ago, SloChicken said:

Riding on flats is standard in racing, happens all the time.

a good friend was flatting basically every race and finishing (wins/podiums) on them

If there is time, changing makes sense, but riding a flat works well enough, given you have a good rim lock of some sort often the tire won’t do great, but they are expendables. Usu the rim hangs in there well.

Heavy duty zip ties work well to hold the tire to the rim if you flat with a tube but can depend on distance/speed/terrain.

Could be handy in a race cus easy to carry a bunch and cut down to approximate length and quick to put on say 4 or 6 of them and I don't race or flat often otherwise I'd look at the other options.

I do a fair bit of multi day dirt bike/camping trips and its nice to have everything you need firstly be comfortable and to deal with any bike stuff at the site cus some times the places are remote.

 

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