Jump to content

Good workout routine for harescramble racing?

Recommended Posts

Next season I plan on racing for the 1st time ever. I currently dont work out but i do ride a lot. I just trail ride for now. I want to start getting into working out and being able to keep my pace up the whole race. No, i dont plan on winning but I dont want to quit cause I get tired early.... so what are some good routines to do in the gym to help out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, RidingWithStyle said:

 

Next season I plan on racing for the 1st time ever. I currently dont work out but i do ride a lot. I just trail ride for now. I want to start getting into working out and being able to keep my pace up the whole race. No, i dont plan on winning but I dont want to quit cause I get tired early.... so what are some good routines to do in the gym to help out?

 

How much time are you able to dedicate? 

What is your current fitness like? Are you overweight? Hard gainer? 

What is your overall goal? 

Do you have access you a gym? Pool? 

Any ailments? Bad ankles? Knees? Shoulders? 

Are you flexible? 

What's your current diet? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A high intensity workout focusing on high reps and little downtime to keep your heart rate up with help tremendously. Depending on what equipment you have access to, you could do a circuit involving an upper body, a leg and a mid-section (ab) routine with minimal rest time between exercises. 

For example, do 30 pushups, followed by a 10 second rest, followed by 20 squats, followed by 10 seconds of rest, followed by 30 situps. Then repeat the cycle but change the exercise. Then do 12-15 bicep curls/military press, followed by 20 lunges, followed by 30 situps. Do a 5-6 circuit exercise and then run 1 to 1.5 miles. Three to four days per week.  That will most definitely get you tuned up to long distance riding. 

To get more advanced, cut down the 10 second rest between exercises to 5-7 seconds. 

On your off days, run intervals - if you live in a subdivision, jog from one street lamp to the next, then sprint to the next street lamp, then jog, then sprint, etc. 

Edited by Augoose
  • Like 2
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Drop-Bear said:

Swimming. Great for your lungs. Dr's advise people with asthma to swim. It's also the only common sport where you use every muscle in your body all at one time. Same as MX etc 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How much time are you able to dedicate? 
What is your current fitness like? Are you overweight? Hard gainer? 
What is your overall goal? 
Do you have access you a gym? Pool? 
Any ailments? Bad ankles? Knees? Shoulders? 
Are you flexible? 
What's your current diet? 

Its decent. I work in a trade that is hard work (HVAC) and you gotta be pretty flexible in some places. Lol.

Im 230 currently. Goals would be 200-210 would be great. Im also 6’ 1” or 6’ 2”....

I dont have a gym membership but can go for free with my dads “bring a friend” card. But I have a local planet fitness.

Current diet is ok. As far as time goes to dedicate I have most weekdays to go afternoons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swimming. Great for your lungs. Dr's advise people with asthma to swim. It's also the only common sport where you use every muscle in your body all at one time. Same as MX etc 

Dont have a YMCA membership anymore cause they charge way too much for it. Other than that no pool access.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, RidingWithStyle said:


Its decent. I work in a trade that is hard work (HVAC) and you gotta be pretty flexible in some places. Lol.

Im 230 currently. Goals would be 200-210 would be great. Im also 6’ 1” or 6’ 2”....

I dont have a gym membership but can go for free with my dads “bring a friend” card. But I have a local planet fitness.

Current diet is ok. As far as time goes to dedicate I have most weekdays to go afternoons.

 

What you want to do is have it so your body is prepped for the first race of the season. Dropping 15-20lbs safely is only good for about a 1lb per week. Find out your daily calories are and reduce them slightly, by like 200-300 calories. As you get closer to race season you'll have to make adjustments accordingly which can be revisited here. 

I wouldn't do any high intensity workouts at this moment. It's a good way to build conditioning but it won't be sustainable over the next couple months...Also your muscles and cardio system are ready for that yet. 

I would go to the gym 2x a week for the next 2-3 weeks. This will help build muscle which in turn will help burn body fat. Something like 2 sets of 12 reps of every body part... Include both squats and deadlifts. You don't need to do some dumb 1 legged, balancing on a ball, while lifting heavy weights BS. Just nice and simple exercises...

If you are able  to ride 2x a week in between that great. Practice on high intensity sprint motos. Starting with 2-10min motos and working you way up in times... If you can't ride, do some moderate rowing, swimming or spinning. Anything low impact that's going to be easy on the joints... 

Do that for a bit and come back and revisit this thread... 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a bit different for me. I did 100% cardio for an hour every day (the length of my C races) and gradually upped intensity. Never had any issue with strength or technique, just cardio endurance. Completely gave up on strength training when it felt like it was just making the cardio worse.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/27/2019 at 4:26 PM, RidingWithStyle said:

 

Next season I plan on racing for the 1st time ever. I currently dont work out but i do ride a lot. I just trail ride for now. I want to start getting into working out and being able to keep my pace up the whole race. No, i dont plan on winning but I dont want to quit cause I get tired early.... so what are some good routines to do in the gym to help out?

 

Find a coach that specializes in "cross country" training.

Cardio, cardio, cardio.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Search Lactate Threshold training. Lots of info out there on bicycling/spin.

Yoga and circuit training/crossfit are positives as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Start out easy for a few months, you want to be in peak shape during the season, not before. Low intensity cardio to drop the weight. You will want to do some strength and balance training also. Sleep, diet and, recovery are a must or all your work will be wasted time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you like cycling look into a smart trainer and an app called zwift. It’s basically a workout video game, it makes training during the winter months a lot easier for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More important then training is eating. Stay away from all processed man made foods. Eat as if grocery stores and the keebler elf never existed and you will have more energy and stamina for free. Riding is ultimately the best training, but you have to learn to be critical of yourself and your riding and instead of doing a 100 mile ride, do 100 miles of critique. Stand. Use the classic david bailey roman chair exercise to build your legs to stand in the attack position. The more you sit, especially in tight stuff, the more you will fight the bike and wear out, so learn to stand in all situations and focus on exercises that allow you to stand more.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What they said ^^^  ride more.  Not weenie riding.  Set lap goal. Use Strava (free) to track progress. Cruising around wont condition you. Riding fast and standing 95%, will put you up front.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find seat time helps C class and overweight riders but not so much for reasonably fit A & B class riders. The better you get, the more efficient you are on the bike and get less from just seat time. Around here harescrambles require more endurance fitness than skill as the terrain is generally not very difficult and the format is an all out sprint to the end. For on the bike training, isolate specific skills and practice them opposed to just riding around and calling it seat time training.  

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×
×
  • Create New...