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Cornering a 125 two stroke

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Hey guys

I ride a yz125 and I am struggling on keeping momentum on corners. I've read that you don't downshift much on a 125 but then you won't have any power out of the turn. I feather the clutch but I either feather it too much or not enough. Any tips ?

Thanks

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You absolutely need to downshift.  Downshift as many times as you need to.  Use the clutch, and carry more speed.  But don't forget to downshift!  I don't know who told you not to downshift, but that is very false lol.  

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Try downshifting whatever you have to do to keep rpm's up. Momentum is your freind on a 125 and got to be on the gas  bud. Try 1rst gear even until get fadt then 2nd 👍🏽 

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On most MX tracks, when cornering a 125 figure downshifting one gear and, likely two gears if you are at beginner/novice level.

Don't try to follow 4-strokes by cutting to the inside line, use the outside line / berm to keep momentum up.

As soon as you finish braking, start twisting the throttle even if you're still at the corner entry so the rpms are spooled up by the time you exit the corner.

With rpms held high, feather the clutch all the way thru the corner until you're straightened out so not to upset the chassis with a sudden burst of wheel spin.

When you think you're leaning the bike as far as possible into a corner, practice leaning it even more past your usual comfort zone.

 

It only took me 5 years to get the hang of it. :ride:

 

Edited by mlatour
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Make yourself a track with lots of corners or a figure 8 track. Practice practice practice 😊

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Yep,  keep it in the right gear all the time so it sings when it's time to go.  ... and keep in mind that "fanning" or slipping the clutch is no substitute for being in the correct gear. 

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Oh boy, where to begin.... a 125 is a high RPM, low torque engine, so gear selection is of utmost importance.

You need to find a nice sweeping corner at a practice track somewhere and do it over and over until you begin to realize how subtle changes in technique on a 125 can make a big difference in cornering speed. The first thing to do is work on entering the turn faster by braking later but harder while standing on the bike. It is at this time that you should be downshifting a gear or two. As you begin to let off the brakes, drop into the seat and allow your body to move up on the gas tank, inside leg out and high, outside peg weighted as you begin to "twist" the throttle, not stab at it. If you are bogging, downshift again but stay on the throttle and be prepared to stab at the clutch. Slipping a 125 clutch isn't as effective as being in the right gear. Lean the bike over, inside elbow up and out and the outside arm about straight but loose.

As you begin to exit the turn but still railing the berm, grab another gear and slide back on the seat to get the front end light and traction for the rear wheel. Set your sights down the upcoming starightaway as you repeat this until it becomes one fluid motion. If you are struggling with this, watch how others are doing it. Observe and learn, practice and get faster.

You can pass more people going in and out of turns that down straightaways, and MX is a drag race from turn to turn, so exit speed is very important. Good luck

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On 12/21/2019 at 3:52 PM, ss-racing said:

Yep,  keep it in the right gear all the time so it sings when it's time to go.  ... and keep in mind that "fanning" or slipping the clutch is no substitute for being in the correct gear. 

This. Slipping the clutch is great in the corner itself, but you need to be in a gear that means the clutch is fully released and you're in the 'fat' part of the power when you're pointed down the next straight and hard on the gas. Not exact, but if you're still slipping the clutch by the time your foot is back on the peg, go down a gear.

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