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What Makes a Bike a Good Rear End Steering Machine

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I've owned bikes that are great front end steering and lousy rear end steering, great rear end steering and lousy front end steering, lousy front and rear steering and everything in between.  I have a pretty good idea what make a bike steer well on the front but have no idea what makes a bike steer well on back.  Any ideas?

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".....have no idea what makes a bike steer well on back"."  Throttle and lean angle??  The Beta 200rr is my answer.  🙂 Pegged around a corner she'll easily slide/steer through at speed with the rear.  It's a friggn blast and something I could not do on my last ride.

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Throttle, knees, footpegs and the right tyre?

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My CR500 is the best out of anything else I've had, especially at speed, you just can't beat big flat power (torque really) for this. You can stick it into a corner at almost any speed on pretty much any surface, lean it over and crank on the gas and it'll slide.

Otherwise, long, low and front weighted is the next best thing. Stiff suspension helps. At speed anyway. Were you talking fast or slow?

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Power is the primary ingredient. 

I forget who said it, but when asked something similar to "How do you know when you have enough power?"  The response was "when I can spin the tire from the exit of one corner to the entrance of the next".

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I wasn't referring to the bikes ability to slid but instead its ability to back into corners and change direction confidently.  IMO it is not a riding technique issue (got moved into this forum) but something probably having to do with the bikes geometry, weight distribution, or maybe suspension.  A few years ago I had a bike that was unusually good at it and I'd like to be able to 'tune' that into my current ride if possible.

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I wasn't referring to the bikes ability to slid but instead its ability to back into corners and change direction confidently.  IMO it is not a riding technique issue (got moved into this forum) but something probably having to do with the bikes geometry, weight distribution, or maybe suspension.  A few years ago I had a bike that was unusually good at it and I'd like to be able to 'tune' that into my current ride if possible.

It’s a rider technique issue and a setup issue. Honestly I believe it’s more in how you ride the bike, but at the same time you have to have the bike setup to that riding style.
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Everyone knows twostrokes steer with rear and fourstokes steer with front wheel.  That's that giver some gas 😊

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7 hours ago, dirtdigger617 said:


It’s a rider technique issue and a setup issue. Honestly I believe it’s more in how you ride the bike, but at the same time you have to have the bike setup to that riding style.

Ok... So, I am trying to discuss the chassis side of this not the technique side as I have owned bikes that no matter how your technique is it wouldn't back into corners well and vice versa.  In all the years I've been riding MX I've never heard anything about this aspect of handling.

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1 hour ago, texas angler said:

Talk to me about “backing into a corner”. Never heard that before. 

Its a term used more for street bikes/racing where the wheels are out of alignment as you are entering the corner. The back wheel steps out which helps pivot the bike into the corner allowing you to square up the corner and get on the gas harder/sooner for a better drive out. Its not always the fastest way through the corner but looks awesome when done properly.

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1 hour ago, spaceboy said:

Its a term used more for street bikes/racing where the wheels are out of alignment as you are entering the corner. The back wheel steps out which helps pivot the bike into the corner allowing you to square up the corner and get on the gas harder/sooner for a better drive out. Its not always the fastest way through the corner but looks awesome when done properly.

Seems you’re also describing Flat track riding. Now I understand. 

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On 1/10/2020 at 10:09 AM, Sahr Kastic said:

I've owned bikes that are great front end steering and lousy rear end steering, great rear end steering and lousy front end steering, lousy front and rear steering and everything in between.  I have a pretty good idea what make a bike steer well on the front but have no idea what makes a bike steer well on back.  Any ideas?

Short wheelbase, steering head angle, bikes balance point all make her want to steer easier with throttle. But rider input and power output are huge influence. The riders ability to feel what he wants the bike to do in a corner is important, but experience and experimentation will determine what parts of the setup formula are helping or preventing desired results from the machine. Sometimes increasing tire pressure to reduce tire footprint and allow bike to slide around more when cornering. This can help with testing. Rider position can change weight distribution on bike. Rider Weight forward allows rear to spin tire easier on corner entry to slide with throttle application. Moving rear wheel forward or rearward changes balance point as well. Testing these adjustments can help a rider determine if a change helps or hurts the feel of the bikes sliding ability. Small changes to one adjustment at a time can help tune your bikes cornering or sliding ability more to a riders preferences, within the bikes ability/limitations

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1 hour ago, everlastneverfast said:

Short wheelbase, steering head angle, bikes balance point all make her want to steer easier with throttle. But rider input and power output are huge influence. The riders ability to feel what he wants the bike to do in a corner is important, but experience and experimentation will determine what parts of the setup formula are helping or preventing desired results from the machine. Sometimes increasing tire pressure to reduce tire footprint and allow bike to slide around more when cornering. This can help with testing. Rider position can change weight distribution on bike. Rider Weight forward allows rear to spin tire easier on corner entry to slide with throttle application. Moving rear wheel forward or rearward changes balance point as well. Testing these adjustments can help a rider determine if a change helps or hurts the feel of the bikes sliding ability. Small changes to one adjustment at a time can help tune your bikes cornering or sliding ability more to a riders preferences, within the bikes ability/limitations

Sorry. Neglected to mention handlebar bend, pullback and amount of handlebar rotation will all affect rider position and as a result the balance of bike.  Very simple to adjust handlebar rotation for testing purposes. Most riders are amazed at the change a few degrees of rotation of bars or the height or angle of bars can influence bikes handling and also rider comfort (reduce arm pump)    try these easy adjustments before trying extensive modifications

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