Jump to content

How to get more body english in the air?

Recommended Posts

I've been feeling a lot more confident with jumping and would like to learn how to have more body english while jumping. Mainly, learning how to turn the bars while bringing my chest up with the bike & directing it where I want it to go.

 

Everytime I try, I'm just literally turning my wheel a little bit and making the back wheel swap out a little.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like a whip? hard to understand exactly what you're asking as far as style. I think the biggest things to keeping control of the bike in the air are staying centered and squeezing with your knees. I see a lot of people lean off the side of the bike and their knees are all chickened out so the bike never moves. The second biggest thing I see is people leaning off the back of the bike and they have no control over the bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry I'm not being to clear but not a whip...maybe a baby whip? I am currently jumping in the attack position, good form, knees squeezing the bike etc. I'd like to be looser on the bike and be able to move myself and bike around easier in the air. I think what I may try is starting off like a mini whip, directing the bike slightly off to the left while leaving the jump then turn the bike and my hips to the right in the air to come back down. Does that make sense?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, DirtBikeHead said:

Sorry I'm not being to clear but not a whip...maybe a baby whip? I am currently jumping in the attack position, good form, knees squeezing the bike etc. I'd like to be looser on the bike and be able to move myself and bike around easier in the air. I think what I may try is starting off like a mini whip, directing the bike slightly off to the left while leaving the jump then turn the bike and my hips to the right in the air to come back down. Does that make sense?

Approach the jump, choose a peppy gear, goose it at the bottom of the hill, pinch the tank with the knees, and sling the bikes chassis with some body English. Observe a skier jumping a jump, you-tube is your pal. Just do-that...

  • Like 1
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a lot of the motion in the air aside from correcting some weird kicks is all initiated on the face of the jump. once airborne you're trying to move a 200+ lb. dirt bike and fight the gyroscopic force of the wheels. The physics don't seem to work out as a lot of us riders weigh less than our bikes. 

I don't have a physics degree but I think the bike and the gyroscopic force of the wheels want to keep the bike inline with the direction its traveling. Think of why guys give the bike a lot of gas when recovering from huge whips.

 

They only thing that may blow my theory apart is a counter whip which I have no idea how to do but damn does it look sweet!

  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lead with your body so your other control inputs are more effective. Always think of your bike as being comprised of many pivot points (pegs, handlebars), leverage points (shrouds, seat) and two very effective gyros. If you lead with your body first, the gyro and pivot point manipulation won’t need to have the added burden of rider weight to overcome. A simple example. You’re in the air, the rear wheel has kicked out to the right and you want to straighten it out. First, let your body drift over to the right. Then, as you apply pressure to the right peg (no pressure on the left peg) snap the bars to the left. If you applied the above control pressures without leading with your body, the bike would respond much less effectively.

I’ve mentioned this before, but I think it’s helpful for two wheeled riders to understand gyroscopic precession. For an example, spin a bicycle wheel while holding it by each axle end. While it’s spinning, move the axle as if it were being turned by the forks. While emulating a left handlebar turn, the wheel will bank to the right. You may be surprised at how much gyro precession effect even a lightweight bicycle wheel has. Pulling on the left grip while also pressing down on the right peg, nudging the left shroud, and utilizing the gyro as you lead with your body is very effective in this scenario.

  • Helpful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, motrock93b said:

Lead with your body so your other control inputs are more effective. Always think of your bike as being comprised of many pivot points (pegs, handlebars), leverage points (shrouds, seat) and two very effective gyros. If you lead with your body first, the gyro and pivot point manipulation won’t need to have the added burden of rider weight to overcome. A simple example. You’re in the air, the rear wheel has kicked out to the right and you want to straighten it out. First, let your body drift over to the right. Then, as you apply pressure to the right peg (no pressure on the left peg) snap the bars to the left. If you applied the above control pressures without leading with your body, the bike would respond much less effectively.

I’ve mentioned this before, but I think it’s helpful for two wheeled riders to understand gyroscopic precession. For an example, spin a bicycle wheel while holding it by each axle end. While it’s spinning, move the axle as if it were being turned by the forks. While emulating a left handlebar turn, the wheel will bank to the right. You may be surprised at how much gyro precession effect even a lightweight bicycle wheel has. Pulling on the left grip while also pressing down on the right peg, nudging the left shroud, and utilizing the gyro as you lead with your body is very effective in this scenario.

Great post - super helpful

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2020 at 2:48 AM, motrock93b said:

Lead with your body so your other control inputs are more effective. Always think of your bike as being comprised of many pivot points (pegs, handlebars), leverage points (shrouds, seat) and two very effective gyros. If you lead with your body first, the gyro and pivot point manipulation won’t need to have the added burden of rider weight to overcome. A simple example. You’re in the air, the rear wheel has kicked out to the right and you want to straighten it out. First, let your body drift over to the right. Then, as you apply pressure to the right peg (no pressure on the left peg) snap the bars to the left. If you applied the above control pressures without leading with your body, the bike would respond much less effectively.

I’ve mentioned this before, but I think it’s helpful for two wheeled riders to understand gyroscopic precession. For an example, spin a bicycle wheel while holding it by each axle end. While it’s spinning, move the axle as if it were being turned by the forks. While emulating a left handlebar turn, the wheel will bank to the right. You may be surprised at how much gyro precession effect even a lightweight bicycle wheel has. Pulling on the left grip while also pressing down on the right peg, nudging the left shroud, and utilizing the gyro as you lead with your body is very effective in this scenario.

Thank you, very helpful!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2020 at 2:48 AM, motrock93b said:

Lead with your body so your other control inputs are more effective. Always think of your bike as being comprised of many pivot points (pegs, handlebars), leverage points (shrouds, seat) and two very effective gyros. If you lead with your body first, the gyro and pivot point manipulation won’t need to have the added burden of rider weight to overcome. A simple example. You’re in the air, the rear wheel has kicked out to the right and you want to straighten it out. First, let your body drift over to the right. Then, as you apply pressure to the right peg (no pressure on the left peg) snap the bars to the left. If you applied the above control pressures without leading with your body, the bike would respond much less effectively.

 

What your saying is, that if the rear of the bike kicked out to the right, I lean my body weight and peg pressure ON the side that it's kicking out to then snapping bars to the left? I would imagine I'd want to put pressure and lean to the left. Unless the gyroscopic effect of turning the bars to the left will counteract the bike kicking to the right. What about staying neutral on the bike in the above scenario, and just turning the bars to the left? What would that do?

I need to get out on some smaller jumps to practice this and see what happens. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What your saying is, that if the rear of the bike kicked out to the right, I lean my body weight and peg pressure ON the side that it's kicking out to then snapping bars to the left? I would imagine I'd want to put pressure and lean to the left. Unless the gyroscopic effect of turning the bars to the left will counteract the bike kicking to the right. What about staying neutral on the bike in the above scenario, and just turning the bars to the left? What would that do? I need to get out on some smaller jumps to practice this and see what happens. 

 

Plan your moves with your final goal in mind. If your rear is kicked to the right, you probably want to straighten it out so you land with your body directly over it’s centerline balanced equally on both pegs. You can accomplish this in subtly different ways. Pretend you’re frozen in space with the rear kicked to the right, and your bars intuitively turned slightly to the right to keep the front tire aligned with your direction of travel. To pull the bike back under you, you would apply foot pressure to the right peg as you pull on the left grip. Applying left inner knee pressure against the left shroud/seat and adding gyro effect by turning the bars to the left adds more corrective effect. Apply your body weight and momentum where you want to apply corrective leverage, and keep it away from the opposite side for maximum bike movement in response to your inputs.

 

Another example is correcting from a slightly nose high flight. You want to first move your upper body forward, closer to the bars. Then simultaneously push on the bars and take your weight off the pegs. If you add a rear brake tap, the effect is even more pronounced. If you kept your body to the rear pressing the pegs, the brake tap would need to lift your body weight as well. This would greatly reduce the effect of the control forces.

 

This is tricky to explain, so I hope this makes sense.

 

  • Like 1
  • Helpful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, motrock93b said:

Plan your moves with your final goal in mind. If your rear is kicked to the right, you probably want to straighten it out so you land with your body directly over it’s centerline balanced equally on both pegs. You can accomplish this in subtly different ways. Pretend you’re frozen in space with the rear kicked to the right, and your bars intuitively turned slightly to the right to keep the front tire aligned with your direction of travel. To pull the bike back under you, you would apply foot pressure to the right peg as you pull on the left grip. Applying left inner knee pressure against the left shroud/seat and adding gyro effect by turning the bars to the left adds more corrective effect. Apply your body weight and momentum where you want to apply corrective leverage, and keep it away from the opposite side for maximum bike movement in response to your inputs.

 

Another example is correcting from a slightly nose high flight. You want to first move your upper body forward, closer to the bars. Then simultaneously push on the bars and take your weight off the pegs. If you add a rear brake tap, the effect is even more pronounced. If you kept your body to the rear pressing the pegs, the brake tap would need to lift your body weight as well. This would greatly reduce the effect of the control forces.

 

This is tricky to explain, so I hope this makes sense.

 

It does make sense and I thank you for taking the time to explain it to me! Thanks man, I'll experiment with it this week, heading south to ride 👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×
×
  • Create New...