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Super muddy slippery track tips


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I’ve been riding track for a couple of months now getting pretty decent but has anyone got tips for when your riding a really muddy and slippery track to have more control and stop your bars from wobbling so much. My positioning on the bike is generally pretty good. Should I try put my weight back a heap more?does going faster help?

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1 hour ago, GetFiredUp said:

I’ve been riding track for a couple of months now getting pretty decent but has anyone got tips for when your riding a really muddy and slippery track to have more control and stop your bars from wobbling so much. My positioning on the bike is generally pretty good. Should I try put my weight back a heap more?does going faster help?

Best to practice throttle control for slippery traction conditions. No need to worry about the handlebars wobbling too much. They wont break. Too many riders try death gripping handlebars when they should relax grip and let her wiggle and goose the throttle a bit to calm her down. Most of the correct rider inputs required for controlling your motorcycle are contrary to your panicked and fearful impulses/reflexes. Slowing down or applying brakes will usually compound your problems/fears. Applying throttle will usually be correct action/solution. The problem with learning this is the frightened rider has never had the sensation conditioning of observing this method because they have not tried/experienced the correct rider inputs. Only experience and practice will overcome this. My method was to always practice my weakest riding skill until I was improving it instead of fearing it. There is a lot of truth to the old dirt bike adage here" when in doubt,GAS IT"

good luck

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12 minutes ago, everlastneverfast said:

Best to practice throttle control for slippery traction conditions. No need to worry about the handlebars wobbling too much. They wont break. Too many riders try death gripping handlebars when they should relax grip and let her wiggle and goose the throttle a bit to calm her down. Most of the correct rider inputs required for controlling your motorcycle are contrary to your panicked and fearful impulses/reflexes. Slowing down or applying brakes will usually compound your problems/fears. Applying throttle will usually be correct action/solution. The problem with learning this is the frightened rider has never had the sensation conditioning of observing this method because they have not tried/experienced the correct rider inputs. Only experience and practice will overcome this. My method was to always practice my weakest riding skill until I was improving it instead of fearing it. There is a lot of truth to the old dirt bike adage here" when in doubt,GAS IT"

good luck

Thankyou! I will take this into consideration next time I ride. The fact that your reflexes are normally opposite to the correct input makes a lot of sense. Very helpful👍🏽

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On 3/23/2020 at 12:03 AM, GetFiredUp said:

I’ve been riding track for a couple of months now getting pretty decent but has anyone got tips for when your riding a really muddy and slippery track to have more control and stop your bars from wobbling so much. My positioning on the bike is generally pretty good. Should I try put my weight back a heap more?does going faster help?

If it's soft, then weight back a bit helps. Going faster definitely helps. Don't worry about the bars wobbling, you can't stop that. When riding in deep mud, remember you are just guiding the bike, you can't really steer accurately, let it go where it wants.

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On 4/4/2020 at 11:31 AM, DEATH_INC. said:

If it's soft, then weight back a bit helps. Going faster definitely helps. Don't worry about the bars wobbling, you can't stop that. When riding in deep mud, remember you are just guiding the bike, you can't really steer accurately, let it go where it wants.

Awesome tips very helpful👍🏽👍🏽

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On 4/4/2020 at 11:45 AM, bg10459 said:

I'm definitely not a stand all the time rider, but you are usually better off standing if it's really muddy.  Like said, throttle control and don't fight the bike.

Yeah the biggest thing for me is probably fighting the bike so that’s what I won’t do next time. Thankyou 👍🏽👍🏽

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5 minutes ago, GetFiredUp said:

Yeah the biggest thing for me is probably fighting the bike so that’s what I won’t do next time. Thankyou 👍🏽👍🏽

Try this: there was a suggestion to be on the pegs. I like that. Dont "over grip". I like that too. I find it easier to loosen my grip on the bars if I grip the bike more with my legs. That is easier for me if most of my weight is on the balls of my feet, and my toes are pointed in. That points your knees into the bike, provides a grip and takes a lot of the load off your arms. Once your arms aren't working so hard trying to keep you centered, throttle control is easier, steering  more relaxed, and without your jerking due to you balancing with your arms, the wobbles diminish.

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On 4/3/2020 at 5:45 PM, bg10459 said:

I'm definitely not a stand all the time rider, but you are usually better off standing if it's really muddy.  Like said, throttle control and don't fight the bike.

Throttle control and staying loose is key.  A damper can help keep the back end behind you.  We designed our damper with a bell curve for that purpose.  Turning the bars or the back end coming out are the same motion from the dampers perspective.  People are shocked as to how much it controls the backend.   You will find you can ride on the pegs much better in slippery conditions.

2050750061_bellcurvev3.jpg.3070868567021058a6d7bd43ef1224ad.jpg

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1) Don't use front brake

2) Move body back a bit, lighten front

3) Brake before a particularly bad section then gas thru it. You don't have to be heavy on the gas but you need to be on the gas to track well.

 

It takes time squirreling around mud and sand before you get used to it.

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