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Legit innovation in motorcycle engine oils?

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I'm sub'd to product updates & news from a lot of manufacturers and I recently I received an update from Maxima Racing Oils that I thought was interesting. They claim to have created an oil additive package that has elements with different affinities (attraction) to different materials (metal engine internals  vs. clutch materials). The goal was to maximize HP by reducing crankcase friction while striking a balance with the goal of clutch friction increasing. The additive package is called PEAC (Performance Enhancing Additive Chemistry).  They have a one pager if you're curious at: https://www.maximausa.com/peac-formula/

What do you think of Maxima's approach? Legit science? Marketing fluff? 🤓

image.png

 

Rotella... Now that we have that out of the way... 😜

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The only way to know is to test it.  Measure oil temps, fuel consumption, send out oil samples to analyze wear metals.  Even dyno testing.  If there is a measurable improvement in efficiency, wear or performance then we can say this is the real deal.

I like Maxima products but I doubt this oil is anything special.

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According to the charts, power gain was at about 5,200 rpm, just the beginning of the power curve and falls off after that. Power absorption is from oil viscosity and churn/whip. You cannot change churn and whip with an oil so it has to be viscosity. Oil works by creating a film between moving parts that prevents contact.

Improved clutch 'grab' is not a problem with most bikes, actually most people complain the clutch is too grabby already.

Cleanliness is insignificant.

Tests were done on a 125cc bike with the oil run for 48 hours. I cannot think of any 125cc 4S MX bikes and who in the world runs oil in an MX bike longer than 10 hours?

While I have no doubt it is good oil, there are plenty of good oils and none are extraordinary. At the top of the heap, full ester syn oil is noticeably better, many companies make/market this. However, it is expensive and arguably, if you change often (like at the five hour mark) there is no difference in performance and even changing more often, is cheaper (assuming your time is free)

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If this stuff is legit it's quite a break through. They show hp increase up to 2 percent which is huge cuz that could be a whole hp on a 450. Just one more step on the way to completely frictionless. 

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31 minutes ago, William1 said:

According to the charts, power gain was at about 5,200 rpm, just the beginning of the power curve and falls off after that. Power absorption is from oil viscosity and churn/whip. You cannot change churn and whip with an oil so it has to be viscosity. Oil works by creating a film between moving parts that prevents contact.

Improved clutch 'grab' is not a problem with most bikes, actually most people complain the clutch is too grabby already.

Cleanliness is insignificant.

Tests were done on a 125cc bike with the oil run for 48 hours. I cannot think of any 125cc 4S MX bikes and who in the world runs oil in an MX bike longer than 10 hours?

While I have no doubt it is good oil, there are plenty of good oils and none are extraordinary. At the top of the heap, full ester syn oil is noticeably better, many companies make/market this. However, it is expensive and arguably, if you change often (like at the five hour mark) there is no difference in performance and even changing more often, is cheaper (assuming your time is free)

I've been running Maxima Pro+ that is a full synthetic that is listed as "ester fortified'. Not sure if fortified and full ester mean the same? Semantics? My understanding is that esters are additives that allow the manufacturer to "tune" for the application as chemical building blocks. Regardless, the affinity for different materials in Maxima's PEAC additive package is what I found the most interesting. Is that a function of esters?

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17 minutes ago, B Squared said:

I've been running Maxima Pro+ that is a full synthetic that is listed as "ester fortified'. Not sure if fortified and full ester mean the same? Semantics? My understanding is that esters are additives that allow the manufacturer to "tune" for the application as chemical building blocks. Regardless, the affinity for different materials in Maxima's PEAC additive package is what I found the most interesting. Is that a function of esters?

Now you are asking a question that is above my pay grade. My limited knowledge is that esters are the building block of oil molecule chains. The purer the ester, the more consistent the molecule chains are. These molecule chains are what does the actual separation of moving parts. Unfortunately, gears (like a trans) work to cut the molecules like scissors. This is where a great oil shines, that it has 'strong' chains of a consistent size so as it gets sliced up, what remains is still adequate. Imagine a bucket full of washers. One bucket, all the washers are the same size. As you cut them up, you still have a lot of the ideal sized washers. Take a second bucket, a majority are the same ideal sized, some bigger, a lot smaller. As you slice them up, you end up with a a lot of smaller, less useful washers.

Esters are not additives (like zinc, moly or detergents).

Bob the oil guy explains it in better detail.

https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/esters-in-synthetic-lubricants/

https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/effects-of-shearing/

https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/basic-lubrication-design/

https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/motor-oil-101/

Remember, you asked....

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19 minutes ago, B Squared said:

I've been running Maxima Pro+ that is a full synthetic that is listed as "ester fortified'. Not sure if fortified and full ester mean the same? Semantics? My understanding is that esters are additives that allow the manufacturer to "tune" for the application as chemical building blocks. Regardless, the affinity for different materials in Maxima's PEAC additive package is what I found the most interesting. Is that a function of esters?

My research tells me that Esther is so beautiful she bewitched a persian king and was a great benefactor of her tribe.

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, InsaneClownPossum said:

My research tells me that Esther is so beautiful she bewitched a persian king and was a great benefactor of her tribe.

I never met an "Esther" like that.  The esters i met in organic chemistry we're LOTS different. In fact when you hear about them in some magazine oil write-ups and tests, they must have changed a whole lot since I first met them.

Edited by ossagp1
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Posted (edited)

I am reading the two areas that address clutch grip and slip. What I am hearing is that their intent was to create an oil that would lubricate better (and do all those things that lubricate has come to mean) and still keep the qualities that a wet clutch requires. The second statement sounds a little more on the "marketing" aspect. I don't think anyone should be clutch tuning with oil, or at least it isn't my approach, but I do like being able to use as light of a spring rate as I can find.

Some of you might have been lucky enough to have a pair of chemistry professors like I did who came from the oil industry. I got to do two types of viscosity tests while I was still in the eighth grade. I had a prof in college who had worked in developing two stroke outboard oils on his entry into the industry (his story was no one else wanted to so the new grads and interns were stuck with it).

Edited by ossagp1
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10 minutes ago, crypto666 said:

Accordion to the charts, Rotella is better. 

 

1789111046_rOTELLAYES.jpg.63710f12b4597545be0964b2079c27c3.jpg

I am taking it to ward off the latest pandemic.100 percent success so far.

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Hey all, great discussion on this topic and I'm happy to see that it's inspiring spirited debate! This topic is pretty close to my heart as the technology director at Maxima and primary formulator behind the new oils. I'd like to provide a little more info as to why we ran certain tests and why those tests matter. I'd love to hear your thoughts and will be happy to elaborate further and answer any additional questions as I'm able.

For my part, I've been working with oil my whole professional career. I graduated from Pitt with degrees in chemistry and biology and went to work at a lube blending plant / refinery (American Refining Group) right out of college. If any of you are also 4-wheel guys you might recognize their former brand name Brad Penn. After that I was a technology manager at Lubrizol, the largest of the big 4 additive companies, where I developed additive packages, specialty chemicals and finished fluids for oil companies. It was at Lubrizol that I began working with Maxima, ultimately joining Maxima a little over three years ago to manage their technology. As a former moto rider, current motorcyclist and all around enthusiast for things that burn fuel and go fast, it was a perfect blend of my professional experience and personal interests. Maxima being located in San Diego had absolutely nothing to do with it...

Sorry for the boring intro, but the intent in sharing my background is to add some legitimacy to the message and hopefully offer some assurance that I'm not some snake oil salesman blowing Castor 927-scented smoke back up your respective tailpipes. I'm not a marketing guy or salesman and am legitimately surprised they're letting me speak directly to consumers due to my occasional lack of uh...tact, if you will.

So, on to PEAC, "Performance-Enhancing Additive Chemistry", pronounced "peak". I came up with the acronym myself and since I am neither a marketing guy nor especially creative, that's why it's lame. Sorry. Lameness aside, it has real meaning and really does improve performance.

It was noted that our primary power gains in the dyno curve are at low to mid engine speeds. This is 100% true and the reason is because the aforementioned additive chemistry reduces friction at those very speeds, the "boundary and mixed lubrication regimes", in nerd-speak. As engine speed increases and/or load decreases, moving out of boundary and mixed friction, additives stop playing much of a role in regard to friction as the hydrodynamic lubrication regime is entered. In this lubrication regime, fluid viscosity is the primary determiner of friction and since both oils were 20W-50s, with nearly identical kinematic viscosity and high-temperature / high-shear (HTHS) viscosity, it makes sense that they start to look more similar as engine speed increases. The only way to see large differences at high engine speeds is to use a thinner fluis, but if we had used a 10W-40, for example, it would have defeated the purpose of the exercise. We wanted to show that if you have a machine that recommends viscosity grade X, the new oil will help facilitate more power output than the previous iteration in the same machine using the same viscosity grade. Factory Kawasaki was kind enough to help us prove that out with dyno testing. 

The reason we discuss clutch friction and compared with a leading OEM oil is because in most cases when you reduce friction to increase power, some slippage is experienced in the clutch, often to a detrimental degree. We wanted to show that our new oils help increase power while also still helping to facilitate effective power transfer through the clutch. You can have the most powerful engine on earth, but if the output doesn't get to the wheels, it doesn't really matter. 

For cleanliness, it's a fair argument that it is insignificant if you're changing your oil very frequently, but not everyone does. Also, we had to account for other applications where our oils are used, such as street, that do run much longer drain intervals. The 125cc engine was chosen not to mimic a dirt bike or a road bike, but to provide the most severe conditions possible. Power density (output/displacement) is typically higher with smaller displacement engines and provides the most challenging environment for an oil to maintain cleanliness. Running it for 48 hours at full load and high temperature ages the oil artificially to mimic the cumulative effect of many, many hours of riding. 

Ester-fortified means that we have selected and included specific esters to do specific things. In the case of Pro Plus, those esters help to improve power. In engine oils, esters are used as base oils, similar to a PAO or a grp II mineral oil. The difference between esters and most other base oils is that esters act more similarly to additives in that they're functionalized, meaning they interact with surfaces. Most other base oils act as carrier fluids and do not have any functionality, while esters add benefits beyond what can be achieved with additive chemistry alone. In this specific case, the esters we use in Pro Plus help to provide that increased power at high engine speeds you can see in the dyno comparison. The esters help to keep friction lower at high engine speeds, where in their absence, these two oils of equivalent viscosity would otherwise have equivalent power output. I'm not aware of any 100% ester 4-stroke engine oils on the market, since esters are like most other things, in that there can be too much of a good thing. Specifically, too much ester can compete with additives like ZDDP, detergents and dispersants, ultimately resulting in a loss of performance. Not to mention that since esters are polar, they can attack elastomers in seal and gasket materials, causing them to degrade prematurely. It's all about balance, using the right components, in the right amounts, for the right application.

This response has been a novel and I apologize, but before I stop blabbing I have to address Rotella. With 100% cross-my-heart honesty, I can tell you Rotella is a fantastic oil. I personally know the fine gentleman who created the additive package specific to Rotella and who worked with Shell to develop the finished oils. He's one of the smartest people I know at a company full of very smart people. In retrospect, I have no idea why they hired me. 

Anyway, as I said, Rotella is an absolutely phenomenal oil...for heavy duty diesel engines. The demands of heavy duty diesel means that Rotella contains a bunch of detergent and subsequent TBN, a ton of dispersant to handle all the soot and contaminants produced from diesel combustion, boatloads of antioxidant due to long drain internals, etc. etc. All of these things are great for just about any engine, but do you need that much detergent or dispersant for a dirt bike or a street bike? You sure do not.

"But it's cheaper, so why not?" 

Because you want to go faster, right? Or heaven forbid, want better fuel economy??? Dispersants and detergents are big, surface-active molecules that create drag and increase friction, reducing power. Diesel oil has tons of both, because it has to, so while it may be cheap, and it will work, and you almost certainly won't have any hardware issues, it's not giving you any more than protection. It's not giving you an edge or an advantage, even a minuscule one, because it's not a racing oil. It's made specifically for a different application, where our oil was designed from the get-go to help maximize power from your machine. I spent the last three years working on these oils and getting them as close to racing perfection as possible, because we're Maxima Racing Oils, not Maxima "Adequate, Cheap and Available at Walmart" Oils.

Thanks for hearing me out, assuming you're still awake and I'd love to hear any more feedback, questions or castrations you guys have. I'm quite delicate, so please take it easy. 

Cheers,

Mike

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Welcome, Mike. You write well, informative and funny. Great info! I don't race any more  these days I tend to do long , slow rides.

I may try this, when I finish off the gallons of rotella I have in the shop...  Maybe sooner.

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, Mike@MaximaUSA said:

Hey all, great discussion on this topic and I'm happy to see that it's inspiring spirited debate! This topic is pretty close to my heart as the technology director at Maxima and primary formulator behind the new oils. I'd like to provide a little more info as to why we ran certain tests and why those tests matter. I'd love to hear your thoughts and will be happy to elaborate further and answer any additional questions as I'm able.

For my part, I've been working with oil my whole professional career. I graduated from Pitt with degrees in chemistry and biology and went to work at a lube blending plant / refinery (American Refining Group) right out of college. If any of you are also 4-wheel guys you might recognize their former brand name Brad Penn. After that I was a technology manager at Lubrizol, the largest of the big 4 additive companies, where I developed additive packages, specialty chemicals and finished fluids for oil companies. It was at Lubrizol that I began working with Maxima, ultimately joining Maxima a little over three years ago to manage their technology. As a former moto rider, current motorcyclist and all around enthusiast for things that burn fuel and go fast, it was a perfect blend of my professional experience and personal interests. Maxima being located in San Diego had absolutely nothing to do with it...

Sorry for the boring intro, but the intent in sharing my background is to add some legitimacy to the message and hopefully offer some assurance that I'm not some snake oil salesman blowing Castor 927-scented smoke back up your respective tailpipes. I'm not a marketing guy or salesman and am legitimately surprised they're letting me speak directly to consumers due to my occasional lack of uh...tact, if you will.

So, on to PEAC, "Performance-Enhancing Additive Chemistry", pronounced "peak". I came up with the acronym myself and since I am neither a marketing guy nor especially creative, that's why it's lame. Sorry. Lameness aside, it has real meaning and really does improve performance.

It was noted that our primary power gains in the dyno curve are at low to mid engine speeds. This is 100% true and the reason is because the aforementioned additive chemistry reduces friction at those very speeds, the "boundary and mixed lubrication regimes", in nerd-speak. As engine speed increases and/or load decreases, moving out of boundary and mixed friction, additives stop playing much of a role in regard to friction as the hydrodynamic lubrication regime is entered. In this lubrication regime, fluid viscosity is the primary determiner of friction and since both oils were 20W-50s, with nearly identical kinematic viscosity and high-temperature / high-shear (HTHS) viscosity, it makes sense that they start to look more similar as engine speed increases. The only way to see large differences at high engine speeds is to use a thinner fluis, but if we had used a 10W-40, for example, it would have defeated the purpose of the exercise. We wanted to show that if you have a machine that recommends viscosity grade X, the new oil will help facilitate more power output than the previous iteration in the same machine using the same viscosity grade. Factory Kawasaki was kind enough to help us prove that out with dyno testing. 

The reason we discuss clutch friction and compared with a leading OEM oil is because in most cases when you reduce friction to increase power, some slippage is experienced in the clutch, often to a detrimental degree. We wanted to show that our new oils help increase power while also still helping to facilitate effective power transfer through the clutch. You can have the most powerful engine on earth, but if the output doesn't get to the wheels, it doesn't really matter. 

For cleanliness, it's a fair argument that it is insignificant if you're changing your oil very frequently, but not everyone does. Also, we had to account for other applications where our oils are used, such as street, that do run much longer drain intervals. The 125cc engine was chosen not to mimic a dirt bike or a road bike, but to provide the most severe conditions possible. Power density (output/displacement) is typically higher with smaller displacement engines and provides the most challenging environment for an oil to maintain cleanliness. Running it for 48 hours at full load and high temperature ages the oil artificially to mimic the cumulative effect of many, many hours of riding. 

Ester-fortified means that we have selected and included specific esters to do specific things. In the case of Pro Plus, those esters help to improve power. In engine oils, esters are used as base oils, similar to a PAO or a grp II mineral oil. The difference between esters and most other base oils is that esters act more similarly to additives in that they're functionalized, meaning they interact with surfaces. Most other base oils act as carrier fluids and do not have any functionality, while esters add benefits beyond what can be achieved with additive chemistry alone. In this specific case, the esters we use in Pro Plus help to provide that increased power at high engine speeds you can see in the dyno comparison. The esters help to keep friction lower at high engine speeds, where in their absence, these two oils of equivalent viscosity would otherwise have equivalent power output. I'm not aware of any 100% ester 4-stroke engine oils on the market, since esters are like most other things, in that there can be too much of a good thing. Specifically, too much ester can compete with additives like ZDDP, detergents and dispersants, ultimately resulting in a loss of performance. Not to mention that since esters are polar, they can attack elastomers in seal and gasket materials, causing them to degrade prematurely. It's all about balance, using the right components, in the right amounts, for the right application.

This response has been a novel and I apologize, but before I stop blabbing I have to address Rotella. With 100% cross-my-heart honesty, I can tell you Rotella is a fantastic oil. I personally know the fine gentleman who created the additive package specific to Rotella and who worked with Shell to develop the finished oils. He's one of the smartest people I know at a company full of very smart people. In retrospect, I have no idea why they hired me. 

Anyway, as I said, Rotella is an absolutely phenomenal oil...for heavy duty diesel engines. The demands of heavy duty diesel means that Rotella contains a bunch of detergent and subsequent TBN, a ton of dispersant to handle all the soot and contaminants produced from diesel combustion, boatloads of antioxidant due to long drain internals, etc. etc. All of these things are great for just about any engine, but do you need that much detergent or dispersant for a dirt bike or a street bike? You sure do not.

"But it's cheaper, so why not?" 

Because you want to go faster, right? Or heaven forbid, want better fuel economy??? Dispersants and detergents are big, surface-active molecules that create drag and increase friction, reducing power. Diesel oil has tons of both, because it has to, so while it may be cheap, and it will work, and you almost certainly won't have any hardware issues, it's not giving you any more than protection. It's not giving you an edge or an advantage, even a minuscule one, because it's not a racing oil. It's made specifically for a different application, where our oil was designed from the get-go to help maximize power from your machine. I spent the last three years working on these oils and getting them as close to racing perfection as possible, because we're Maxima Racing Oils, not Maxima "Adequate, Cheap and Available at Walmart" Oils.

Thanks for hearing me out, assuming you're still awake and I'd love to hear any more feedback, questions or castrations you guys have. I'm quite delicate, so please take it easy. 

Cheers,

Mike

I was directed to your Lubrizol site over 20 years ago by an engineer who worked for Chevron. He told me I could find answers there to what turns oil into a substance that meets the engine manufacturers needs.

Thanks for coming over.

Edited by ossagp1
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5 hours ago, Ltlhondarida125 said:

If this stuff is legit it's quite a break through. They show hp increase up to 2 percent which is huge cuz that could be a whole hp on a 450. Just one more step on the way to completely frictionless. 

Unless they are using a million dollar dyno test cell I doubt the dyno accuracy is 2%.

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@Mike@MaximaUSA  Thanks for the detailed explanation that can still be understood by us non-science majors. Very much appreciate the insight on esters, what they do and why too much of a good thing isn't necessarily better. I can't say that I'm an oil geek, but nothing wrong with being armed with just a little more info when you buy. 

Quote

The esters help to keep friction lower at high engine speeds, where in their absence, these two oils of equivalent viscosity would otherwise have equivalent power output. 

My 350XCF is a revver, so even if squeezing out every fraction of a hp as a recreational rider isn't necessarily critical, decreased friction at higher RPM should also equal less wear, less heat and who doesn't like that? I recently switch to Pro+ when our distributor was out of the Motorex I normally buy, but I don't see me going back, especially with your new PEAC additive package. 

Enjoy SD. I lived there for about 8 years. I miss riding Corral Canyon and Ocotillo!

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I feel like I'm staying at a Holiday Inn Express.  Just learned a lot!

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14 hours ago, Mike@MaximaUSA said:

Hey all, great discussion on this topic and I'm happy to see that it's inspiring spirited debate! This topic is pretty close to my heart as the technology director at Maxima and primary formulator behind the new oils. I'd like to provide a little more info as to why we ran certain tests and why those tests matter. I'd love to hear your thoughts and will be happy to elaborate further and answer any additional questions as I'm able.

For my part, I've been working with oil my whole professional career. I graduated from Pitt with degrees in chemistry and biology and went to work at a lube blending plant / refinery (American Refining Group) right out of college. If any of you are also 4-wheel guys you might recognize their former brand name Brad Penn. After that I was a technology manager at Lubrizol, the largest of the big 4 additive companies, where I developed additive packages, specialty chemicals and finished fluids for oil companies. It was at Lubrizol that I began working with Maxima, ultimately joining Maxima a little over three years ago to manage their technology. As a former moto rider, current motorcyclist and all around enthusiast for things that burn fuel and go fast, it was a perfect blend of my professional experience and personal interests. Maxima being located in San Diego had absolutely nothing to do with it...

Sorry for the boring intro, but the intent in sharing my background is to add some legitimacy to the message and hopefully offer some assurance that I'm not some snake oil salesman blowing Castor 927-scented smoke back up your respective tailpipes. I'm not a marketing guy or salesman and am legitimately surprised they're letting me speak directly to consumers due to my occasional lack of uh...tact, if you will.

So, on to PEAC, "Performance-Enhancing Additive Chemistry", pronounced "peak". I came up with the acronym myself and since I am neither a marketing guy nor especially creative, that's why it's lame. Sorry. Lameness aside, it has real meaning and really does improve performance.

It was noted that our primary power gains in the dyno curve are at low to mid engine speeds. This is 100% true and the reason is because the aforementioned additive chemistry reduces friction at those very speeds, the "boundary and mixed lubrication regimes", in nerd-speak. As engine speed increases and/or load decreases, moving out of boundary and mixed friction, additives stop playing much of a role in regard to friction as the hydrodynamic lubrication regime is entered. In this lubrication regime, fluid viscosity is the primary determiner of friction and since both oils were 20W-50s, with nearly identical kinematic viscosity and high-temperature / high-shear (HTHS) viscosity, it makes sense that they start to look more similar as engine speed increases. The only way to see large differences at high engine speeds is to use a thinner fluis, but if we had used a 10W-40, for example, it would have defeated the purpose of the exercise. We wanted to show that if you have a machine that recommends viscosity grade X, the new oil will help facilitate more power output than the previous iteration in the same machine using the same viscosity grade. Factory Kawasaki was kind enough to help us prove that out with dyno testing. 

The reason we discuss clutch friction and compared with a leading OEM oil is because in most cases when you reduce friction to increase power, some slippage is experienced in the clutch, often to a detrimental degree. We wanted to show that our new oils help increase power while also still helping to facilitate effective power transfer through the clutch. You can have the most powerful engine on earth, but if the output doesn't get to the wheels, it doesn't really matter. 

For cleanliness, it's a fair argument that it is insignificant if you're changing your oil very frequently, but not everyone does. Also, we had to account for other applications where our oils are used, such as street, that do run much longer drain intervals. The 125cc engine was chosen not to mimic a dirt bike or a road bike, but to provide the most severe conditions possible. Power density (output/displacement) is typically higher with smaller displacement engines and provides the most challenging environment for an oil to maintain cleanliness. Running it for 48 hours at full load and high temperature ages the oil artificially to mimic the cumulative effect of many, many hours of riding. 

Ester-fortified means that we have selected and included specific esters to do specific things. In the case of Pro Plus, those esters help to improve power. In engine oils, esters are used as base oils, similar to a PAO or a grp II mineral oil. The difference between esters and most other base oils is that esters act more similarly to additives in that they're functionalized, meaning they interact with surfaces. Most other base oils act as carrier fluids and do not have any functionality, while esters add benefits beyond what can be achieved with additive chemistry alone. In this specific case, the esters we use in Pro Plus help to provide that increased power at high engine speeds you can see in the dyno comparison. The esters help to keep friction lower at high engine speeds, where in their absence, these two oils of equivalent viscosity would otherwise have equivalent power output. I'm not aware of any 100% ester 4-stroke engine oils on the market, since esters are like most other things, in that there can be too much of a good thing. Specifically, too much ester can compete with additives like ZDDP, detergents and dispersants, ultimately resulting in a loss of performance. Not to mention that since esters are polar, they can attack elastomers in seal and gasket materials, causing them to degrade prematurely. It's all about balance, using the right components, in the right amounts, for the right application.

This response has been a novel and I apologize, but before I stop blabbing I have to address Rotella. With 100% cross-my-heart honesty, I can tell you Rotella is a fantastic oil. I personally know the fine gentleman who created the additive package specific to Rotella and who worked with Shell to develop the finished oils. He's one of the smartest people I know at a company full of very smart people. In retrospect, I have no idea why they hired me. 

Anyway, as I said, Rotella is an absolutely phenomenal oil...for heavy duty diesel engines. The demands of heavy duty diesel means that Rotella contains a bunch of detergent and subsequent TBN, a ton of dispersant to handle all the soot and contaminants produced from diesel combustion, boatloads of antioxidant due to long drain internals, etc. etc. All of these things are great for just about any engine, but do you need that much detergent or dispersant for a dirt bike or a street bike? You sure do not.

"But it's cheaper, so why not?" 

Because you want to go faster, right? Or heaven forbid, want better fuel economy??? Dispersants and detergents are big, surface-active molecules that create drag and increase friction, reducing power. Diesel oil has tons of both, because it has to, so while it may be cheap, and it will work, and you almost certainly won't have any hardware issues, it's not giving you any more than protection. It's not giving you an edge or an advantage, even a minuscule one, because it's not a racing oil. It's made specifically for a different application, where our oil was designed from the get-go to help maximize power from your machine. I spent the last three years working on these oils and getting them as close to racing perfection as possible, because we're Maxima Racing Oils, not Maxima "Adequate, Cheap and Available at Walmart" Oils.

Thanks for hearing me out, assuming you're still awake and I'd love to hear any more feedback, questions or castrations you guys have. I'm quite delicate, so please take it easy. 

Cheers,

Mike

This was a good read, thanks 

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