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So I'm currently running tubeliss front and rear on my TE-300i and I'm not really trusting the system yet. My first real ride my rear low pressure chamber went flat allowing something sharp (guessing small rock but never found the culprit just the hole) to get inside my tread popping the high pressure tube. Also the front kept losing air, about 5# every few hours. Now it looks like the loss in pressure was self induced due to damaging the bead on both front and rear treads when installing the tubeliss system. I have since corrected the error in my spooning technique. 

As a result of my experience thus far about 20hrs, im not really trusting the system. I've read a lot of positive reviews on tubeliss but I'm willing to sacrifice performance for increased durability since I don't race and am just out trail riding. 2nd season on a dirtbike been backcountry sledding since i could walk. If I were to swap to a set of nitro mousse either just front or both, do i need to get a new set of rims or can I bolt the rim locks back in the holes that I drilled out for the low pressure Schrader valves?

I'll add that im currently running a shinko 546 80/100 21 front and shinko 525 110/100 18 cheater rear and haven't put a real ride on the bike since i swapped out the front. 

Thanks for any advice, I've hit the point that I can't decide whats better bike's or sled's.

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The nitros will drop right in. Use the rim lock, plug the new hole, and steel a Schrader valve from an old tube. Cut the valve out and use the two thin nuts to clamp it to the rim. Tape up the rim as you would any bib, pole a hole for the valve and done.

This new valve makes it easy to , add lubes later, easy inflation to set a troublesome bead.

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Nope you can use the rims you have, just put your rimlock in the valve stem hole. I have heard of people using the tubliss setup with a mousse installed also, that way you have air adjustment but if you get a flat you have the bib to keep you going. I've been running bibs in the rear wheel for probably 4 years now and will never go back to tubes.

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Lol, does anybody read posts, prior to posting? Lol

 

Also, make CERTAIN YOU ORDER THE BIB FOR YOUR TIRE AND RIM COMBO

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I also tried the Tubliss system but after about 4 flats from both front and rear I went back to ultra heavy duty tubes. Touch wood I never had a puncture prior to fitting the Tubliss and since going back to tubes. I liked the feeling of the lower pressures of Tubliss but couldn’t live with the flats. I have been told that your rims have to be in really good condition (like new) & tire selection was very important with no soft wall MX tires or imperfections on the tire to rim mating area. 

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I did the front and rear Tubliss on my 300xc. I like the performance, but that’s it. I didn’t like the install and the side wall on the tires gets cracks really early in the tires life span. I feel I need to store the bike off the ground all the time and I’m worried moisture inside is causing corrosion on the rim and rusty spokes. I’m about to switch to bibs also. 

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I’m worried the front tire sidewall will roll with the foam insert and that the rear tire will lose the bead and come off the rim. I was thinking tubliss but using a foam insert as well (tubliss with mousse inside) sounds like a very attractive option

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12 hours ago, Borthwick203 said:

I’m worried the front tire sidewall will roll with the foam insert and that the rear tire will lose the bead and come off the rim. I was thinking tubliss but using a foam insert as well (tubliss with mousse inside) sounds like a very attractive option

I have asked them on Instagram about any r&d on this idea and they never responded. I like the idea too because the high pressure bladder would secure the bead and the foam would support the tire. The foam could be those balls they once used. I also asked if they are working on their own tire development and no response.  

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1. If you have slow leaking with Tubliss, chances are 99% that you have an installation problem. See the Tubliss FAQ for how to address.

2. Tubliss works with just about any tire. But, as some have suggested, there are some good reasons to select tires with firm sidewalls with Tubliss. First and foremost, they will provide good ride-home capability if you can't plug a flat. They also provide good stability at low PSI.

3. Many people misuse Tubliss by running low PSI with tires that weren't designed for it (e.g., soft-carcass MX tires). Under-inflating this type of tire leads to sloppy handling, reduced durability, and more flats.

4. Bead stability with a properly-sized and correctly-installed mouse is excellent, but you must run a rim lock. If you are worried, install a second rim lock opposite the first. Tubliss should not be necessary.

Both Tubliss and mousses are mature technologies that have proven useful and are reliable. They are not perfect: they are expensive and installation is more complicated than regular tubes.

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I am 99.9% certain you are correct about the install. I restarted with a new front and rear tread and so far they are holding air, currently running 10#. I haven't ridden anything super rocky yet but I am starting to trust them.

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I've never had a flat with tubliss after getting an initial seal and only once had a sealing issue after install which was quickly remedied. 

One thing I do is use Stans tire sealant in place of the soapy water in the instructions and I make sure to get a good coat of armor all on the outside of the red liner on each install. After mounting the tire before inflating I go back around the bead on each side and apply a generous amount of Stan's inside with a paint brush. Then air up the high pressure to 110psi and the outer to 30psi and let it sit overnight. Check that it's holding the next day then remove the core on the low pressure and add a few ounces of Stans to the main chamber to protect against small punctures. 

Like others have said I think the key is to run a stiff side wall tire that can run at 0psi so you can keep riding even if you get a puncture. 

I ran tubliss front and rear for awhile but now I run a mousse in the front since I was liking 10-12 psi anyway figured no point in having any risk of a flat, but still like the low 3-5 psi in the rear. 

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Never understood the stiff/soft sidewall thing. I guess stiff lets you ride out on zero but overall it just means it runs generally less psi for the same flex where a soft tire will run more. People get all hooked on psi numbers when thats really not apples to apples unless its the same tire/size.

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On 7/8/2020 at 9:10 AM, Turn,TheScrew said:

Lol, does anybody read posts, prior to posting? Lol

 

Also, make CERTAIN YOU ORDER THE BIB FOR YOUR TIRE AND RIM COMBO

Wtf are you talking about? I answered his question about wheels and gave him an idea on still using the tubliss if he wants.

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8 hours ago, Ethan Bushong. . said:

I am 99.9% certain you are correct about the install. I restarted with a new front and rear tread and so far they are holding air, currently running 10#. I haven't ridden anything super rocky yet but I am starting to trust them.

When I was using them I'd fill up a water bottle with very soapy water and dump half in each wheel. Seemed to help alot.

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Ethan, I wouldn't give up on the Tubliss yet, my friend.  My experience has been excellent with Tubliss but I may have the odds in my favor.

As others said, sidewall I think is very important once the installation issues are solved.  I have run a Pirelli MT43 and a MOTOZ Extreme hybrid (Both very stiff sidewalls and flexible crowns) with excellent results in Washington and also Alabama/Florida on a heavy 450X. I have no problem leaving on a ride with zero PSI in the tire (I'm just careful of hard hits)  but prefer 4psi due to stability.  My front tire is the Goldentyre Fatty, also stiff sidewall and lots of footprint.

That said, I'm not riding race pace, not a ton of rocks (but they handled them superbly for about 50hr of AZ riding),not riding pavement aside from short connectors, and I don't have to deal with thorns.  I have about 120 hours on each of those tires and before every ride, I just add air to the desired Pressure because the back seeps out nowadays. Didn't used to.

Another factor is Im usually riding from the truck, and carry 550 chord in case I have a total failure as you did. Some carry zipties.  I just tie about 4-6 loops around the tires, cinching it to the rim to get home ( did that on a conventional tube that failed and it worked so well we just kept riding for the rest of the day).

For me the radiculous traction is worth the effort on a tire change and haven't had any issues other than old tires seeping air.  If I was on a long multi-day adventure or in heavily thorned areas I would reconsider my options but would probably just concede to relying on an air source and carrying an extra tube for self-extraction

Cheers, keep working at it...one thing I've learned is these machines are a constant joirney.

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