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XR400r rear bearing retainer clips

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Hello I have my 2001 xr400r needing new bearings i cannot take the old ones out cause they wont come out then someone told me they have retaining clips on the outside.. they are stuck in and nothing i have tried will get them out.. Please help 

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No clip of any kind. Take propane blow torch heat hub one side.  Get long ponch bend tip slightly to one side. Put in hole in wheel opposite heated side . Knock out easy. 

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get a foot long chisel or steel rod.  Run it through the wheel from the opposite side and then HIT IT HARD alternating each side of the bearing.  The bearings in my XR650 and XR400 lasted for years so they were stuck big time.    Yes, it is unnerving to smack the crap out of your wheel but that is what it takes.    To install the new ones, put the bearing in the freezer, the wheel in the sun, and lube the wheel hub.  It should go back in with some light tapping around the outside or use a large socket that fits the OUTSIDE bearing race exactly to drive it in.   Don't be afraid. 

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I would spray some Kroil or PB Blaster all over that bearing and let it soak. As stated get a rod that fits through the sleeve BUT maybe a 1/4" smaller. The sleeve has to be moved off center enough to hit the lower bearing and knock it out. Also don't hit the bearing in one spot try to work your way around the bearing so it doesn't get cocked coming out or you can crack your hub. If it won't move apply heat as stated above JUST to the aluminum to expand the hub and quickly try to knock it out again.

 

My preferred method is a press, it's a more controlled way to remove and install bearings plus you can feel when something isn't going right and it's about to break. With a hammer you'll know after it's broke.

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And the hub has to be supported on a solid surface before hammering on the bearing.

I set the side of the hub with the bearing I want to remove, face down, on my garage floor, the hub supported by a piece of 2x4 on each side of the bearing bore. That supports wheel/hub, makes soild contact with the floor and leaves the bearing bore open to be able to hammer the bearing out from the top side.

Clean up/smooth out any nicks/damage to the aluminum bearing race of the hub before trying to punch out the bearing.

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8 hours ago, bajatrailrider said:

No clip of any kind. Take propane blow torch heat hub one side.  Get long ponch bend tip slightly to one side. Put in hole in wheel opposite heated side . Knock out easy. 

there is on the sprocket side i got the bearing out but not the clip i bearing broke... clip is still stuck and i cannon get it out I need this done by tomorrow i am bringing my dirtbike upnorth 

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I'll probably get hammered over this. Take your favorite penetrant (mine is Kroil) and generously apply to the bearing between the race and the hub AFTER you clean the hub and bearing mating surfaces with a small wire brush and brake cleaner. Blow out with compressed air making sure all is clean of any debris. Place the hub flat on the floor and apply the penetrant and let it sit for awhile so it works. Do the same to the other bearing/race. If you have a clutch pilot bearing/bushing puller insert it in the inner race hole and moderately tap it out with a slide hammer. Note: This will not work on a destroyed bearing! If only the outer race is present you need to use a long old heavy duty flat head screwdriver to catch the outer race lip and tap it out. Use a flash light to find the indentations on the inside hub to place the driver (screwdriver). Heat and penetrating oil are your friends, just do not use them at the same time! If all fails, take it to somebody who has done this before. When re-assembling clean the bearing mating surfaces with Scotchbrite and clean with brake cleaner. Use anti-seize when installing the bearing. Look inside the hub assembly itself. If it has dirt/rust in it clean it out using a brush and brake cleaner until it is clean. Blow out any remaining dirt particles. Happy Riding!

On the bearing, take it to a bearing shop or a real automotive parts house, size the bearing and get a DOUBLE SEALED bearing. My Husky took the same ball bearing used in GM/Delco alternators!

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One other item...Never, ever hit the inner race (Where the axle goes thru) to drive in a bearing, Use a socket just a little smaller than the bearing race to drive in the new bearing and seat it.

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3 minutes ago, Naaasty said:

I'll probably get hammered over this. Take your favorite penetrant (mine is Kroil) and generously apply to the bearing between the race and the hub AFTER you clean the hub and bearing mating surfaces with a small wire brush and brake cleaner. Blow out with compressed air making sure all is clean of any debris. Place the hub flat on the floor and apply the penetrant and let it sit for awhile so it works. Do the same to the other bearing/race. If you have a clutch pilot bearing/bushing puller insert it in the inner race hole and moderately tap it out with a slide hammer. Note: This will not work on a destroyed bearing! If only the outer race is present you need to use a long old heavy duty flat head screwdriver to catch the outer race lip and tap it out. Use a flash light to find the indentations on the inside hub to place the driver (screwdriver). Heat and penetrating oil are your friends, just do not use them at the same time! If all fails, take it to somebody who has done this before. When re-assembling clean the bearing mating surfaces with Scotchbrite and clean with brake cleaner. Use anti-seize when installing the bearing. Look inside the hub assembly itself. If it has dirt/rust in it clean it out using a brush and brake cleaner until it is clean. Blow out any remaining dirt particles. Happy Riding!

On the bearing, take it to a bearing shop or a real automotive parts house, size the bearing and get a DOUBLE SEALED bearing. My Husky took the same ball bearing used in GM/Delco alternators!

Not gonna get hammered by me! IMHO, sound advice, start to fin.

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Just now, Naaasty said:

One other item...Never, ever hit the inner race (Where the axle goes thru) to drive in a bearing, Use a socket just a little smaller than the bearings OUTER race to drive in the new bearing and seat it.

FIFY 😉

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If you see a clip in there then first try taking a punch and tapping on it all the way around. That may help brake it loose some. Then, in the holes where your snap ring pliers go, find a punch or something small enough to fit in one and knock the end your 'punch' is in toward the other end. This should brake loose about a third or so of the ring. Then do the same in the other hole. The ring should pop free at this point so that you can get snap ring pliers in to pull it out. If the 'center' part of the ring remains stuck then try putting the punch back in one of the holes and tap toward the other end like before but also a little bit inward toward where the axle would be. Try not to bugger up those holes so that the snap ring pliers will work well. Those larger rings are also pretty strong so it will pay to get the best snap ring pliers you can afford - some can be pretty pricey. 

 WEAR SAFETY GLASSES! Those rings can go flying off right when you think everything is going great.

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  Worth mention, is a technique I learned as a teen, hanging around a Diesel repair shop (Many decades ago).

Hardened Valve seats, or worn-out wheel bearing outer races-- (And Even stubborn Cylinder Sleeves), were routinely removed by a process often referred to as "Weld it Out".

  Basically, on a hardened valve seat in a Diesel Head, you would run a fast bead of weld around the inside with an 1/16" 6011 stick rod, For bearings, perhaps 1 or 2 passes of 1/8" 6011 on the inside diameter of a large tapered bearing outer race--Like a 10,000Lb. axle front hub would have.  As the weld cools, it contracts, often to the point that the valve seat or bearing race would literally drop out. MIG can work also, but for some reason 6011 stick rod seems to work best. I suspect it penetrates the hardened surface and grabs the base metal better, thus creating a better shrinking effect.  

I've used it several times over the years, and it always worked. 

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15 minutes ago, TreeKing said:

  Worth mention, is a technique I learned as a teen, hanging around a Diesel repair shop (Many decades ago).

Hardened Valve seats, or worn-out wheel bearing outer races-- (And Even stubborn Cylinder Sleeves), were routinely removed by a process often referred to as "Weld it Out".

  Basically, on a hardened valve seat in a Diesel Head, you would run a fast bead of weld around the inside with an 1/16" 6011 stick rod, For bearings, perhaps 1 or 2 passes of 1/8" 6011 on the inside diameter of a large tapered bearing outer race--Like a 10,000Lb. axle front hub would have.  As the weld cools, it contracts, often to the point that the valve seat or bearing race would literally drop out. MIG can work also, but for some reason 6011 stick rod seems to work best. I suspect it penetrates the hardened surface and grabs the base metal better, thus creating a better shrinking effect.  

I've used it several times over the years, and it always worked. 

I've used that technique. It works well although there are secondary considerations, such as spatter (don't want any on the surface you must run the new bearing through) ALSO: You need to make sure the ground lead is on or as close as possible to the race you are welding. (If the ground lead is not directly attached to that race, it can arc and spot weld the race to what you are trying to remove it from.  Other than that, good method of removal.

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2 minutes ago, 00boob said:

I've used that technique. It works well although there are secondary considerations, such as spatter (don't want any on the surface you must run the new bearing through) ALSO: You need to make sure the ground lead is on or as close as possible to the race you are welding. (If the ground lead is not directly attached to that race, it can arc and spot weld the race to what you are trying to remove it from.  Other than that, good method of removal.

Good Call---I should have mentioned that on the truck hubs, we would actually use a 1/4" (AKA Baseball Bat) stick rod on the ground clamp. One guy would "Stick" the Ground rod fast to the race while the other would run the 1/8" rod at ~120 amps around the race.  One of the "Hotshot" mechanics in the shop would connect 2 stingers--one Hot and one "Ground" and run beads with both at the same time!--about an inch apart.

There are also plenty of good spatter guard sprays/pastes you can use to protect parts that are in harms way.

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