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XR250R 88 XR250R Frame issue

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Hi all!

I am a new member to TT but have been a long time reader. I recently acquired an 88 XR250R project and wanted to get some advice. I normally wouldn’t touch a machine with a frame issue, however I got it for a song and thought it might be a fun project. The bike at some point had the kickstand ripped off which also damaged the frame. From what I have read on the net, this unfortunately is more common than you would think on this bike. My thought is that the easiest direction is to obtain another used frame and transfer across the parts. Frames seem to be fairly a available. The bike runs pretty good and is all there, albeit dirty. 

 Are there any frame swap gotchyas? Obviously a loose frame may be loose for a reason, why is that? Bent, broken, etc..

I have seen other patch this type of frame issue however I am less keen on that type of repair on a dirt bike. 
 

thanks! 

 

 

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Edited by Zerofail
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My experience is most of the XR's are still going today or DOA, most any found by sheer luck wouldn't be fit to utilize due to either wreckage or ran to death. Depending on the purpose of the bike, trails, fast, slow, hard or riding habits yours can be safely repaired (others WILL more than likely disagree but that's based on their own personal handicap or hammer headedness) but I wouldn't want to repair it with the anticipation or purpose of jumping it. Doing some homework may land you a frame but not likely in any timely manner, Strangely I just witnessed a friend in the EXACT predicament. He had his repaired for less than $100 & its good as new. 

Good luck

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Thanks. I hav seen a few patch jobs on that area around the net. I would definitely NOT be jumping this bike at this point. I agree with the notion that most found used frames have usually been stripped for a reason. I have located one near me but am not sure what to look at. Cracks and rust are the obvious issues, however alignment integrity is tough without bolting everything up. 

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1 hour ago, Zerofail said:

Thanks. I hav seen a few patch jobs on that area around the net. I would definitely NOT be jumping this bike at this point. I agree with the notion that most found used frames have usually been stripped for a reason. I have located one near me but am not sure what to look at. Cracks and rust are the obvious issues, however alignment integrity is tough without bolting everything up. 

Another option is doing it yourself if resources & ability are readily available. Cut section out, use grade 8 bolt same size as I.D. remove bolt head & use for internal support at splice. That's how I extended the swing arm on my drag bike. Its a proven method, 

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A competent welder can repair it and will be stronger than new.

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I agree with Willie , having some welding experience myself a competent welder will have no issue in repairing the frame with some round stock . He can do both sides to match and it will be stronger than it was stock. The other problem with switching frames is the VIN number for most brands of bikes is the one on the steering stem not the motor number .This is the number on the title or MSO.  Some bikes can be ID'd with the motor number but not all , in fact some have no connection between the two. Most DMV's or OHV authorities go strictly off of the VIN  on the steering stem .

The last thing you would want is to do a frame swap with a frame from a stolen M/C , however if the donor frame comes with a clean title then the bike becomes that bike . The other possible hazard would be if it is a branded title such as non repairable or salvage title then your bike becomes that one.. Or if the new frame has no title but your old one did the old title is useless and you now have a bike with no proof that it is yours..

 

 

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8 hours ago, Zerofail said:

Hi all!

I am a new member to TT but have been a long time reader. I recently acquired an 88 XR250R project and wanted to get some advice. I normally wouldn’t touch a machine with a frame issue, however I got it for a song and thought it might be a fun project. The bike at some point had the kickstand ripped off which also damaged the frame. From what I have read on the net, this unfortunately is more common than you would think on this bike. My thought is that the easiest direction is to obtain another used frame and transfer across the parts. Frames seem to be fairly a available. The bike runs pretty good and is all there, albeit dirty. 

 Are there any frame swap gotchyas? Obviously a loose frame may be loose for a reason, why is that? Bent, broken, etc..

I have seen other patch this type of frame issue however I am less keen on that type of repair on a dirt bike. 
 

thanks! 

 

 

5AC0D41F-CCCC-40A6-B076-5722AD2DD4B0.jpeg

ECFA1260-D4B8-49E4-9242-DF913C6EBEF2.jpeg

common as mate!that and cracking under the footpeg mounts..i did this on my xr250r and one of my xr600r,just take it to an engineer get him to weld it up and get another side stand,get a bracket on there,weld it up,  spray paint and walk away!!then forget all about it,its fixed,chances are you wont be pounding an old bike like that as hard as the abuse they got when new!!!great bikes!!

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How are the engine and suspension on your bike before you put a lot of money into it I would get it ride able. If your engine is good you may be able to find a good rolling chassis that has a dead engine with a title. Plan on spending some time during the frame change cleaning and greasing the steering head and swing arm bearings. 

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A few of the xr400 guys have the same kick stand issues and I've seen some real nice fixes. Find a decent experienced welder that likes to tackle odd jobs. Ask around and pop into the welders shop and ask questions, and you'll get a feel if he(she) wants to be bothered or not. You in the which part of MD. ? N S E W ?

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18 minutes ago, bork said:

A few of the xr400 guys have the same kick stand issues and I've seen some real nice fixes. Find a decent experienced welder that likes to tackle odd jobs. Ask around and pop into the welders shop and ask questions, and you'll get a feel if he(she) wants to be bothered or not. You in the which part of MD. ? N S E W ?

I am in Sykesville MD. Based on all the replies here I may try to find a local welder to give it a shot. There is used 1986 frame close, however I am a little leary on an unknown frame. If I go the welding route I assume I should strip it down? (Or disconnect the electronics at the least?) 

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No need to disconnect electronics. Remove tank, drain carb and place welder ground to bare spot as close to job as possible. 

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I have an 87 XR250R.  One 9f my favorite bikes.

I've not had any problems finding parts. Of course I have needed many parts once I got it lined out a couple of years ago. Great bike.   Very reliable. Just fix what you have, ride and enjoy. No need to turn it into a bigger job than it needs to be. It's not a race bike. 

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You were going to strip it down anyway for swapping over parts and clean things up, so do so for having the original frame repaired. You'll be able to look the rest of the frame over good at the same time in case there are any other areas that could use some attention.

Plus, You'll be able to paint it afterwards.

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29 minutes ago, Trailryder42 said:

You were going to strip it down anyway for swapping over parts and clean things up, so do so for having the original frame repaired. You'll be able to look the rest of the frame over good at the same time in case there are any other areas that could use some attention.

Plus, You'll be able to paint it afterwards.

That is a great point. I may strip it down to have the welding performed. There are a few other small repairs I can do on the bike at the same time. Then, if they can’t fix the original frame I could swap it at that point. I have not painted a motorcycle frame like this in the past. Any insights? Have it media blasted prior to paint or just clean, sand and hit it with rattle cans? 

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A media blaster dos a much better job. Gets all the little nooks and crannies.

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I did a XR frame about 10 years ago. I had the frame walnut blasted to clean off the old paint, tell the blaster to be careful around the VIN number.  I then welded on some brackets for a 85 XR250R skid plate. Next I spray can painted the frame with VHT primer and VHT wheel paint (silver), and top coated w/ Varathane clear exterior urethane.

Still in good condition but my boots did wear thru the paint.  I also used VHT high temp engine paint on the cylinder and head, VHT low temp engine paint on the cases.  Also check out their caliper paints. VHT has a wide range of temp rated paints from wheel to header. The cylinder head might see 400F, will never see 500F, so plenty of paints to choose from.

After assembling the bike I had weak spark so I bared the frame electrical ground point to bare metal and added a ground jumper wire to a bared spot on the engine cylinder head. With all of the fresh paint I was experiencing weak spark and the bare metal connect points and the jumper wire fixed it. 

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If you blast it, you might as well powder coat it. Only another $100 and that will include the blasting. 

See how scope creep develops. 

You should not have to strip the frame to fix this. Don't overthink it unless you want a restoration project.  If the bike runs well, make the weld repair and ride it. 

Nice thing about mine is I don't have to worry about scratching it up. Someone did that for me before I bought the bike. 

Good luck with it. They are great bikes. 

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I agree ^. It's totally up to you whether you bead blast the frame and have professional paint job/power coat done or just degrease and rattle can it. Depends on what kind of project you originally had in mind when you bought it.

Stripping it down tho, to have the frame repair work done makes it easier for the welder to orient the frame in the positions he needs to do the repair. Plus, during the strip, you'll find components that need attention themselves. Like if you find a difficult to remove swingarm bolt, indicating those bearings and sleeve need attention.

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