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Duane Nickull

Wanted to share a simple tool I made

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I recently bought a 2002 WR250 with a seized engine with a goal to rebuild it. As I read the manual, I realized (once more) there are many "special tools" (see schematics) to tear down and rebuild a single cylinder engine.  Two of the tools are the magneto (flywheel) holder and clutch tool.  After some research and figuring out they both cost well over $120, I decided to build my own. I want to share the design and hope others find this useful.

Both tool have a common high-level purpose - hold a rotating mass in place with enough stability to allow disassembly/reassembly.  I am sure other have probably done similar things but I could not find them.  Anyways, the third image is my home made tool - > about $6 in parts.  The components are 3/16" cold rolled steel, 1 inch wide and misc. hardware (bolts).  Since I have both a welder and a tap and die set, all it took was about 1 hour to make this.

It works for both clutch and magneto sides. 20201218_154101.jpg.834a79c7b05d46bbc5fe715b8a7d640d.jpg20201218_154054.jpg.7de5da5f276b5b33254e6f0bd15b064d.jpg20201218_154048.jpg.2a4c9b3efbca3b246deca62dcc422898.jpg20201218_154014.jpg.1006b180c639534886dbb8a5a7ffabdf.jpg20201218_154005.jpg.e22530e53c9701008f40d9b3d38c52af.jpg



 

 

 

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I like the concept and definitely the adjustability. My main concern would be only (4) tabs holding the aluminum clutch basket while torqueing the hub nut to something in the range of 100 ft/lb.

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Or just use an air powered 3/8 drive impact wrench with a Six point socket for uninstall and a Strap wrench and a torque wrench for installing. 

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1 hour ago, eric wesche (skippy622) said:

I like it. Its has more teeth to hold the basket. Other tools just have 1 and they don't fit very well. 

Thank you all!  The clutch basket teeth are made from a piece of 1 inch X 1 inch cold rolled mild steel cut in half. I was going to use angle iron but the idea of adding two extra points to share the load on the basket seemed intuitive (since it it aluminum).  

Advice - if you copy it (feel free), I made a small error with the adjuster nut. While it works, I have had to add a few washers under the nut so a wrench or socket can grab it better.  

;-)

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7 hours ago, 76xtdrvr said:

I like the concept and definitely the adjustability. My main concern would be only (4) tabs holding the aluminum clutch basket while torqueing the hub nut to something in the range of 100 ft/lb.

The stock tools only use two points instead of four, placing more load on each clutch basket fin. I also shared this worry however at the stock specification of 60 nM of torque (about 43 foot pounds), it didn't even leave a scratch.  The clutch doesn't need to be super torqued as there is a lock tab washer.
.

5 minutes ago, mikeridered said:

Nice work! Not to highjack, but Homemadetools.com would be a great place for this. Alsso great for lots of other stuff too.

feel free to post the photos.

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51 minutes ago, Duane Nickull said:

The stock tools only use two points instead of four, placing more load on each clutch basket fin.

Is the large clutch basket nut reverse thread? 

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I have made the mistake of fabbing a magneto tool like that and the studs went in too far and damaged the coils. Maybe run some jam nuts on there to keep from going too deep. ( Insert "that's what she said" joke here)

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3 minutes ago, burntvalves said:

Is the large clutch basket nut reverse thread? 

Not on a 2002 Yamaha WR250F. Most bikes I have worked on are proper threads but I heard some makes used to do this. As a precaution, if I ever encounter any left hand thread I place a dot of red paint on it.  This tool will work either way though.

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Just now, axehandler said:

I have made the mistake of fabbing a magneto tool like that and the studs went in too far and damaged the coils. Maybe run some jam nuts on there to keep from going too deep. ( Insert "that's what she said" joke here)

Hahahaha - ROTFL!

Yes, one must refrain from "penetrating" the magneto cavity too deep. I threaded the tool handle where the Allen head bolts go through so I can replace them with different height ones. If I also find a magneto that has smaller holes I will just drill two more holes and thread them with a smaller bolt.  Much better IMO than the "stick a wooden hammer in the rear wheel spokes" and other such methods -> https://dirtrider.net/forums3/threads/clutch-hub-nut-removal.46647/ 

A quote from one of their members:
"Forget the flywheel holder. Put the bike in a high gear , place a 1/2" diamater steel rod through the rear sprocket and over both sides of the swingarm. The nut will now come right off. To reinstall, Put the rod on the reverse side of the swingarm and torque it [clutch hub nut] to specs."

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10 hours ago, Duane Nickull said:

I recently bought a 2002 WR250 with a seized engine with a goal to rebuild it. As I read the manual, I realized (once more) there are many "special tools" (see schematics) to tear down and rebuild a single cylinder engine.  Two of the tools are the magneto (flywheel) holder and clutch tool.  After some research and figuring out they both cost well over $120, I decided to build my own. I want to share the design and hope others find this useful.

Both tool have a common high-level purpose - hold a rotating mass in place with enough stability to allow disassembly/reassembly.  I am sure other have probably done similar things but I could not find them.  Anyways, the third image is my home made tool - > about $6 in parts.  The components are 3/16" cold rolled steel, 1 inch wide and misc. hardware (bolts).  Since I have both a welder and a tap and die set, all it took was about 1 hour to make this.

It works for both clutch and magneto sides. 20201218_154101.jpg.834a79c7b05d46bbc5fe715b8a7d640d.jpg20201218_154054.jpg.7de5da5f276b5b33254e6f0bd15b064d.jpg20201218_154048.jpg.2a4c9b3efbca3b246deca62dcc422898.jpg20201218_154014.jpg.1006b180c639534886dbb8a5a7ffabdf.jpg20201218_154005.jpg.e22530e53c9701008f40d9b3d38c52af.jpg



 

 

 

Good thinking . On the clutch holder ? I just bolted a handle to an old driven clutch plate 

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