Jump to content

Suspension Question

Recommended Posts

Got the (new to me) DRZ out today and pushed it a little on a bad dirt road with sand and bad washboard. The suspension feels perfect on asphalt with D606 front and rear, I can throw the bike around in the lane and it acts as good as a street bike with Progressive Suspension, at least at low speed.

When the sand gets deep or the washboard gets bad the front wheel feels a little disconnected and "floaty" for lack of a better word. Te rear wheel is spot on, no suspension packing, responds perfectly to throttle, doesn't change the attitude of the bike in any unpredictable way, I'm happy with it.

What do I want to do to the front? More or less compression or rebound damping?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are the clickers now? Should be about 1/2 way through the range. Thats always a good starting point. I'd geuss more compression & less rebound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Diverdown said:

 I'd geuss more compression & less rebound.

For sand, yes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Find the stock clicker settings from the factory. Set them and try it out. If it is still "floaty" in the front, move the forks up in the triple clamp 1/4" at a time. What this does is balance more weight on the front end. This has helped many of my KLX friends, not sure why the bike setup comes that way from the factory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gonna ask what kind of tire pressures are you running when feeling this float in the front end?

I know the 606 is a durable tire, but not known for instilling confidence in varying conditions (I’ve run a couple of sets in the past) I was never really happy with them.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The suspension settings were all at stock per the manual, tire pressure in the front is 18 psi. I will try a little more compression and less rebound first, then tinker with fork leg height.

Thanks much!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2021 at 8:58 PM, Diverdown said:

Where are the clickers now? Should be about 1/2 way through the range. Thats always a good starting point. I'd geuss more compression & less rebound.

I put three clicks more into the compression and three clicks less into the rebound and it's like riding a different motorcycle. A little heavy on the asphalt but the trail braking (loading the front shocks to tighten up a radius in a curve or corner) is far more predictable and usable, and the performance in the sand is delightful.

Thank you all!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This adjusting suspension is opening up a new world of motorcycle enjoyment. I had no idea. Reading as much as I can find, understanding less than a quarter of that so far.

What about really bad washboard roads? More or less high speed compression damping in the rear?

Faster (less) rebound damping to keep the rear shock from packing up?

This is adding years to my riding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2021 at 9:02 AM, kdxyardsale said:

Find the stock clicker settings from the factory. Set them and try it out. If it is still "floaty" in the front, move the forks up in the triple clamp 1/4" at a time. What this does is balance more weight on the front end. This has helped many of my KLX friends, not sure why the bike setup comes that way from the factory.

Forks are moved up 1/4" and I backed out the high speed compression on the rear shock 3/4 turn. Stock per the book is 1-1/4, it's now at 2. I just ran over a brick curb to see what would happen, I was aware that the curb was there with the front wheel, not unpleasant or excessive, just noticeable, not a clue that I was running anything over with the rear, it was perfectly smooth. Can't wait to get it out onto the washboard again and see how it does.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lnu, I am 190 lbs and 55, and have ridden for 50 years. My body is pretty abused, so I am set about 2-3 clicks in the softer direction on all the clickers. We have a TON of washboards here on the forest roads to my secret jeep trails, and it works great, I just roll the throttle up on the washers and I cant hardly feel them if at all. 

If you havent investigated setting your sag, you should do that before trying to dial in the clickers. It is THE most important basic suspension thing you can do. Plenty of advice here. Not hard to do, you might need a hand to measure it.

Happy trails, a well setup bike makes riding ten times more fun and less work.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure do appreciate the help.  I haven't checked the sag yet, I will do that.

Does opening up the air box on the DRZ help if the carb jets are not changed? I rode another DRZ with the 3x3 and jet kit mod and I could not believe the difference.  I will be putting the jet kit in at some point, but for now, if it helps at all, it would only take a few minutes to cut that plastic out of the top of the air box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 If your bike is stock, it's already jetted lean and opening up the airbox will make it even leaner

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 1/18/2021 at 3:08 PM, Lnu said:

Got the (new to me) DRZ out today and pushed it a little on a bad dirt road with sand and bad washboard. The suspension feels perfect on asphalt with D606 front and rear, I can throw the bike around in the lane and it acts as good as a street bike with Progressive Suspension, at least at low speed.

When the sand gets deep or the washboard gets bad the front wheel feels a little disconnected and "floaty" for lack of a better word. Te rear wheel is spot on, no suspension packing, responds perfectly to throttle, doesn't change the attitude of the bike in any unpredictable way, I'm happy with it.

What do I want to do to the front? More or less compression or rebound damping?

Undo your front clickers to zero to soften off the suspension, then slowly work your way up if you need to. I have run my SM for 16 years with virtually zero clicks all round.

Edited by Tony Wyp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2021 at 7:08 PM, kdxyardsale said:

Lnu, I am 190 lbs and 55, and have ridden for 50 years. My body is pretty abused, so I am set about 2-3 clicks in the softer direction on all the clickers. We have a TON of washboards here on the forest roads to my secret jeep trails, and it works great, I just roll the throttle up on the washers and I cant hardly feel them if at all. 

If you havent investigated setting your sag, you should do that before trying to dial in the clickers. It is THE most important basic suspension thing you can do. Plenty of advice here. Not hard to do, you might need a hand to measure it.

Happy trails, a well setup bike makes riding ten times more fun and less work.

Sag is definitely off, total travel per book is 295 mm, I had 121 mm sag. I'm guessing I want to be somewhere around 88 to 98 mm. What I learned today is that the locknut on the rear shock has probably not moved since it was installed at the factory in 2004. Despite spraying the threads with penetrating oil I managed to destroy the only lug on the locknut that was accessible from the right side, just forward of the reservoir bottle for the shock. DRZs don't give you a real lot of room, I discovered. I might pull the air boot off when I re-jet so I have access to a few more lugs from the left side, or I might just pull the shock off when I grease the swingarm linkage and loosen up the locknut then.

Much to learn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes much to learn, but you are getting a crash course and once you learn it, your riding will be so much fun and especially knowing you did it yourself. Good job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2021 at 5:42 PM, Lnu said:

Forks are moved up 1/4" and I backed out the high speed compression on the rear shock 3/4 turn. Stock per the book is 1-1/4, it's now at 2. I just ran over a brick curb to see what would happen, I was aware that the curb was there with the front wheel, not unpleasant or excessive, just noticeable, not a clue that I was running anything over with the rear, it was perfectly smooth. Can't wait to get it out onto the washboard again and see how it does.

Backing off the high speed compression damping on the rear along with following all of the other recommendations here did the trick. The bike went from really tiresome to a delight. This weekend I worked it on some bad washboard and some rock fields that I would be careful in with a 4WD pickup and it was totally enjoyable and easy to ride.

I did not understand how much a setting on the rear shock that was not right would influence the behavior of the front end. Like a different bike now, amazing.

Thanks all for the help!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/10/2021 at 6:42 PM, kdxyardsale said:

Yes much to learn, but you are getting a crash course and once you learn it, your riding will be so much fun and especially knowing you did it yourself. Good job.

That inspired me to pull the swingarm and linkage off and lube all of the bearings. The book says it should be doe at 7,000 miles and it just passed 7,100. In other posts here people talk about how Suzuki is not real generous with the grease so I figured I'd better do it.  I read about it on this website and pulled it apart, used lithium based marine grease on the bearings and anti-seize on the bolts. It wasn't bad at all, next time it will be easier because I will know what I'm seeing.

The bearings were all still OK but they definitely needed grease. I don't think it would have been good to have gone much farther without the service.

The weird part is how much better the bike feels -- it feels tighter, and if anything the suspension feels a little stiffer, I have no idea why. The bolts were all tight when I pulled it apart, but now it's like the bike is tracking better, it reacts to input faster, and it the rebound and compression damping feel more certain. Doesn't make any sense to me at all but I'll take it.

There are a couple of bolts I could not get a torque wrench on even with a crows foot, I took a pretty good guess at the torque, next time I do this I will have made a torque adapter out of a couple of sockets and some flat bar stock.

You're right, it feels more like my bike now and I know it a little better. More fun all the time.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lnu said:

That inspired me

Awesome, yes I do this every 4 years or so on my bike, bearings are always good, I even replace the shock and fork oil, bike rides so much better and its easy to do, just a little time consuming and cheap. It always feels like the bike rides, turns and jumps better. I also just enjoy working on my bike, it's addictive to do this yourself and know it is done right. 

Enjoy the ride!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×
×
  • Create New...