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eNiMaLx

How to prevent whiskey throttling-related injuries?

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Posted (edited)

It has happened twice now. The first time I almost went straight inbetween two trees with accidental full throttle. The only thing that prevented the bike's handlebars and my shoulders from possibly getting separated was my last second front brake grab which overcame the rear tire's power...

The second time happened just 1 hour ago. I'm still shaking from what the rear tire would have done to my leg if I wasn't wearing EVS TP199 knee/shin guards... To give you an idea I can poke a key through the now very thin foam. I lost balance while climbing a hill and both the bike and I weren't far from falling into a ditch. Whiskey throttling happened again at that moment and my leg just happened to make contact against the rear tire at that same moment...

I really hate this feeling of vulnerability and I'm seeking a solution before I ever attempt anything like that ever again. Two close calls is way too many for my comfort...

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Edited by eNiMaLx
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I always keep a finger (or two) on both the clutch and brake levers, so if I overthrottle I'm instantly on the clutch.  I also place my hand pretty far over the throttle so my fingers are grabbing more underneath the throttle, and then I roll my back to apply throttle versus rolling down.  Seems counterintuitive, but it gives you more control and less fatigue.  Finally if it's still a problem then maybe look at a progressive throttle set up.  I have the G2 throttle tamer and it definitely smooths out the initial punch of power (roughly $80).

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, CheetoNYC said:

I always keep a finger (or two) on both the clutch and brake levers, so if I overthrottle I'm instantly on the clutch.  I also place my hand pretty far over the throttle so my fingers are grabbing more underneath the throttle, and then I roll my back to apply throttle versus rolling down.  Seems counterintuitive, but it gives you more control and less fatigue.  Finally if it's still a problem then maybe look at a progressive throttle set up.  I have the G2 throttle tamer and it definitely smooths out the initial punch of power (roughly $80).

Thanks a lot!

I'm definitely always keeping three fingers (can't use 2 or 1 due to my 2XL hands) on both the clutch and brake levers from now on! I'll also definitely do your throttle hand technique! I only notice it when I'm tired but my thumb/palm muscles definitely get sore after a few intense hours. I don't have any problem with power abruptness as I smooth it out with the clutch, but thanks for the suggestion! I'm thinking in addition to those 2 things you said to never ever ride when I'm tired (even slightly) ever again. All my close calls have involved fatigue, so it can't be good for me to ride in that state...

Edited by eNiMaLx

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As others said, always always always have your finger on the clutch.

I recommend not "over" gripping the throttle. I.e. whatever neutral riding position you have is zero throttle. Wrist is down. 

Making sure your bike has manageable power delivery for your ability. If its too jumpy/high strung. Consider running a larger front sprocket or smaller rear.

I hadn't done it in years, and consider myself a intermediate rider. 3rd time out on the 300, engine hesitated a bit. I gave it a little more throttle and it absolutely lit up. Hit the ground pretty hard.

After that I put a throttle tamer on the bike and adjusted the powervalve for less hit. Much happier now, it's no fun feeling like the bike wants to kill you.

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Also, be mindful of your right hand position..  IMO proper throttle technique makes whiskey throttle impossible.

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4 minutes ago, braindead0 said:

Also, be mindful of your right hand position..  IMO proper throttle technique makes whiskey throttle impossible.

Could you point me to a resource showing the proper throttle technique?

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, aviduser said:

Making sure your bike has manageable power delivery for your ability. If its too jumpy/high strung. Consider running a larger front sprocket or smaller rear.

I hadn't done it in years, and consider myself a intermediate rider. 3rd time out on the 300, engine hesitated a bit. I gave it a little more throttle and it absolutely lit up. Hit the ground pretty hard.

After that I put a throttle tamer on the bike and adjusted the powervalve for less hit. Much happier now, it's no fun feeling like the bike wants to kill you.

I can concur the sudden power even on my 4-stroke single 400 has led me to discipline myself to always feather the power back on with the clutch. I don't think I need a throttle tamer yet, but who knows down the road 😁!

Edited by eNiMaLx

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When it has happened to me it was too late to do anything but hang on for dear life.  It usually happened with new bikes that were still tight and very responsive to throttle position.  I would think I had the throttle completely closed when in fact it was still slightly open and my body position being in the wrong place would throw me back on the bike opening the throttle even more.  I would suggest a lot of slack in the cable and as mentioned above a milder throttle cam.  I'll keep an eye on this post to see if anyone has a better solution.

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9 minutes ago, eNiMaLx said:

Could you point me to a resource showing the proper throttle technique?

It's not rocket science, I think @aviduser said it well with "I recommend not "over" gripping the throttle. I.e. whatever neutral riding position you have is zero throttle. Wrist is down."  Keep your wrist down or neutral, and acceleration isn't going to compound itself by changing the throttle.

There are probably videos out there going over specific technique, I've never watched any to opine on 'good' resources.. Maybe someone else has.

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3 minutes ago, Sahr Kastic said:

When it has happened to me it was too late to do anything but hang on for dear life.  It usually happened with new bikes that were still tight and very responsive to throttle position.  I would think I had the throttle completely closed when in fact it was still slightly open and my body position being in the wrong place would throw me back on the bike opening the throttle even more.  I would suggest a lot of slack in the cable and as mentioned above a milder throttle cam.  I'll keep an eye on this post to see if anyone has a better solution.

Uh, that's called the bike riding you.. and going about it all wrong.  Riding a bike it about being in control, 100% of the time.

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2 minutes ago, braindead0 said:

It's not rocket science, I think @aviduser said it well with "I recommend not "over" gripping the throttle. I.e. whatever neutral riding position you have is zero throttle. Wrist is down."  Keep your wrist down or neutral, and acceleration isn't going to compound itself by changing the throttle.

There are probably videos out there going over specific technique, I've never watched any to opine on 'good' resources.. Maybe someone else has.

I'm confused now. 

Is that the same thing as "I place my hand pretty far over the throttle so my fingers are grabbing more underneath the throttle, and then I roll my back to apply throttle versus rolling down"?

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G2 Throttle tamer for sure. Worked for me after a WT event. Also try running a little more slack in your throttle cable. 

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33 minutes ago, eNiMaLx said:

Could you point me to a resource showing the proper throttle technique?

Ya just gotta get the feel for it.

Don't hang on too tight. Ya want a nice relaxed grip on the bars. 2 fingers covering the brake and clutch.

I personally don't glue or wire my grips on. Hold on too tight, the grips heat up, and will slip off. I learn best from consequences though.
I don't get arm pump. Ever.

Edited by Drop-Bear

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3 minutes ago, eNiMaLx said:

I'm confused now. 

Is that the same thing as "I place my hand pretty far over the throttle so my fingers are grabbing more underneath the throttle, and then I roll my back to apply throttle versus rolling down"?

Your hand should grip the throttle so that any forward/rearward movement in your body doesn't translate into acceleration or deceleration.  This typically means your wrist, throttle and elbow should be in the same line roughly.  Acceleration/deceleration is generally carried out by twisting the throttle with your thumb/index finger while you loosen the other fingers.. when at about the right throttle position get a firm (but not too firm!) grip with your wrist still in the neutral position.  You can make find adjustments by moving wrist, goal is to keep it as neutral (and whiskey throttle resistant) as possible.

Get enough practice and this all just happens, which is why it can be hard to explain.... I don't think about it, just do it.

Perhaps consider taking some classes, dirt bike/trials either seems like it may be a huge help.   At the least, maybe someone local can give you some pointers and feedback.

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14 minutes ago, braindead0 said:

Your hand should grip the throttle so that any forward/rearward movement in your body doesn't translate into acceleration or deceleration.  This typically means your wrist, throttle and elbow should be in the same line roughly.  Acceleration/deceleration is generally carried out by twisting the throttle with your thumb/index finger while you loosen the other fingers.. when at about the right throttle position get a firm (but not too firm!) grip with your wrist still in the neutral position.  You can make find adjustments by moving wrist, goal is to keep it as neutral (and whiskey throttle resistant) as possible.

Get enough practice and this all just happens, which is why it can be hard to explain.... I don't think about it, just do it.

Perhaps consider taking some classes, dirt bike/trials either seems like it may be a huge help.   At the least, maybe someone local can give you some pointers and feedback.

Yep. Relax and don't overthink things. Try to get into a nice riding rhythm and just flow.

It's all about feel and sound. Feel the bike, just like you do music. If you're not relaxed, you can't dance either, you'll look as stiff as a board. 

Ya feeling me OP? :D

Relax and enjoy. "Find your happy place".

Don't ride the bike as much as just helping to guide it along. Work together like a team. Only give input when you need to. otherwise, be a passenger, the bike is more capable than the rider.

Work smarter. Not harder. Let the bike do the Lions share of the work. The key word being "let". Trust the bike.

Edited by Drop-Bear
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😂😂😂 How the &%$#@! are you going to get within 80% of a Pro level rider playing SIM and watching YT if you can't even get the basics down?🤔🤔🤔

Lol, lot different in practice then in theory... 

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1 hour ago, eNiMaLx said:

Thanks a lot!

I'm definitely always keeping three fingers (can't use 2 or 1 due to my 2XL hands) on both the clutch and brake levers from now on!

2XL hands should be big enough to reach the lever!? Why don't you use 1 or 2 fingers on the clutch? If your other fingers are getting crushed, cut the lever shorter. That's what I do. I cut it so I can barely get 2 fingers on. 

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Posted (edited)

if you sit on the bike and grip the handlebars  naturally (left hand/wrist the same as the right), that is where your throttle hand/wrist should start (“wrist down”). what you should not do is adjust your throttle hand to make it easier to get to full throttle. no throttle/closed throttle should be your natural position. the farther you twist the throttle, the more awkward it should become. 

a side benefit to this is you will need to roll off the throttle to be able to reach the front brake. 

Edited by splyn
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