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How Tight Do You Get Your Tie Downs?


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On 11/15/2021 at 1:16 PM, Adam7 said:

Hello all, Yesterday I went to strap my bike down in my pickup. I hooked the straps to the handle bars and then to the front hooks on the pickup. I was using pretty big ratchet straps and I tightened them up to where my front forks were about 1/2 the way compressed. Is this about right? Am I compressing my forks too much? Thanks in advance!

Use a fork saver or make one out of a chunk of wood. Really helps the bike from moving around as the fork saver keeps the fork from traveling. With out one the forks can compress when you hit a big bump just like they do when you ride. This is when your bike can fall over if your straps are not looped or otherwise mechanically attached. Some prefer to not use them. I have hauled  bikes across the country and all over the place way out in the mountains off road for years. This gizmo does work. 

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8 hours ago, crypto666 said:

I have seen more bikes tip over in trucks and dent bed rails and put holes in the walls of toy haulers from the use of "fork savers."  It doesn't save your forks, but it will destroy everything around it.  

I would blame the operator not the tool

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I've been hauling bikes on trailers, in pickups, and on hitchcarriers since the late 60s. in the late 60s I made Ancra style tie downs using surplus aircraft Ancra buckles. I've got over 6k miles using a hitch carrier. I've never lost a bike but learned from partial tip overs what works and what doesn't.

My take is a fork saver is not required because it prevents the bike's suspension from moving to keep tension on the straps. It does not save seals because normal fork travel puts more pressure on the seal than a fork saver. I've never had a fork seal fail when traveling.
Four point tie down is insurance the bike will stay put if a strap fails.
I added Pit Posse tie down loops to the rear of my bikes for the rear tie downs.
I use soft straps over the handle bars, mostly because of old habits. 
I do like the lower ends of the straps to have a caribinner as it makes a more secure connection to the vehicle.
Front tie downs should go down steeper than the forks to keep down force on the rear wheel of the bike. 
I added extra tie down point to my PU using eyes avail from Home Depot.

Pit Posse tie down clips, designed for forks (there are others do a search), but I attach them to the seat tie down bolts for securing the rear of the bike:

1823153804_PitPosseTieDownClips.png.c30553b15c3bb2d1a5aa4203e2ee1ca6.png

 

 

Edited by Chuck.
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1 hour ago, Tackle Anxiety said:

I would blame the operator not the tool

Correct, the operator chose to use a useless device to prevent an impossible event from occuring.

However, there is no way to assign blame for misusing the device when there is no way to demonstrate that the device worked in any case.

How many forks have been "saved" to date?  

I bet more spokes have been saved by spoke protectors than forks by fork savers.

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I put the bike in the bed from corner to opposite corner and strap it with ratchet straps from opposite corners to the foot pegs. (Making an X) Tighten evenly doesnt take much and the bike wont go anywhere, with minimal pressure on suspension. Thats my go to when loading just one bike.

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Back in the ‘70s we used straps called rope and the idiot driving (me) was a teenager.  I never lost a bike.  The lesson learned was that using rope provided captive ends, so if the suspension compressed due to an urgent (pronounced stupid) driving manoeuvre, the straps would stay in-place.  Fast forward nearly 50 years and I use carabiners to hold the strap ends in-place.  If the suspension compresses to slacken the straps, the bike recovers to the correct as loaded position.  

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I use regular tie down straps for hitch carrier then I put a rope then 2 half hitches on the bars and tied down on the other side as insurance.  That way if the tie downs slip and loosen you won’t lose the bike driving. Actually just using rope is best but not as convenient. It’s use truckers hitch on each side of the bars with half hitches or whatever to lock for safety. You just get a couple of short sections of rope strong enough to hold well. 
 

Here’s a random truckers hitch explanation off YouTube for a super basic how to for those who don’t know. It’s super easy once you do it. There’s a bunch of variations of this too. 
 

 

Edited by hawaiidirtrider
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9 hours ago, mat1018 said:

I put the bike in the bed from corner to opposite corner and strap it with ratchet straps from opposite corners to the foot pegs. (Making an X) Tighten evenly doesnt take much and the bike wont go anywhere, with minimal pressure on suspension. Thats my go to when loading just one bike.

I started doing this if I just have one bike in the bed as well. Holds it very secure and you can load both front and rear suspension a little bit and it keeps it solid. 

I use the straps with carabineers on one end which I clip on the foot pegs, this lets me lean over the bike and push down while pulling the straps tight. 

If I'm loading more than one bike in the bed, I use the moto cinch system which eliminates the hassle of straps altogether. 

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I LOVE these Rhino ratchet straps, and they come with "soft loops" that go around the triples, bars, etc..., without putting steel hooks on your hard parts.  Also, the "S-Hooks" have a spring-loaded "Keeper" (like a carabiner?) so the S-Hooks can't come loose from the soft loops, even if your bike's suspension compresses over a bump.

Lastly, I use FOUR STRAPS, and only crank down the suspension about 1.5-2" (with 12" of available suspension) and yet it's rock solid.  Crank it down more if you feel the need to, but 2-4" should be all you'd need, IME.  (No affiliation, other than I own two sets of the following, and other Rhino products, which are made in China, but designed and sold by a family business in the US.):

RHINO USA Ratchet Tie Down Straps
(I guess you'll have to cut 'n paste the link--I can't make the "insert link text" function work.)

https://www.amazon.com/RHINO-USA-Ratchet-Down-Straps/dp/B01N7P7EOX/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=gorilla+motorcycle+tie+downs&qid=1637179686&qsid=143-8090562-3482412&sr=8-5&sres=B01M07K9YW%2CB01J584XK0%2CB01N7P7EOX%2CB07F23GJKF%2CB01N1NV536%2CB00CJCRGV8%2CB08JPYHXFS%2CB009XIP942%2CB07F9Q9FN2%2CB08P73G99C%2CB07FB7XN5P%2CB01MY4VG66%2CB0792GXF2F%2CB01AS5QC1C%2CB06Y1QGHVM%2CB07R87D15S%2CB091FKCHY6%2CB08ZRYG1CL%2CB00CJCSIIS%2CB07V1JG3QW&srpt=CARGO_STRAP

Edited by Read Valve
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On 11/16/2021 at 7:33 AM, CRJohnny said:

Hey buddy if you can use your tiedown straps around the bottom of the triple clamp not the handlebars. Also Get a fork saver tool that goes between the front wheel and underneath the Front fender , this will stop your forks from compressing

 

CDC009E1-5B6D-4652-A07F-92CE937B84DF.jpeg

What I used way before this type of device was available, was a bit of timber.

measure the distance inside you front mudguard where this bolts to the bottom triple grip.

For example, if this measurement is 80 mm, I found a bit of Timber that was 75 mm wide x 75 mm.

then measure the distance between this point in side your mudguard to the top of you tyre.

Then take about 20 mm off this length. 
this is the size of Timber I used. I just found a scrap bit or a cheap bit. This idea is to save your money.

I would put this in place & as you tighten your tie downs this will pull into the top of your front tyre, probably by about 15 mm.

Your bike should feel secure. 
The Timber or any of these ideas is to save your fork seals from blowing out.

In my trailer I fitted angle iron on each side of the front & back tyre. Because if the front tyre is not fixed in place, it can slowing move sideways & eventually it will fall over.

I attached the top of my tie downs on to the handlebars outside of the top triple clamp.

I hope this helps you.

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I only use a fork saver thing on a hitch carrier with ratchet straps. has worked fine so far.(But I’ve also found like three of thode fork brace things on the roads leading Into riding areas lol) I’ve always used just regular ancra tie downs in truck bed to handle bars. I actually built my own bed brace with front wheel holders built in and it makes all the difference in the world. front wheel never moves so bike never comes loose.
 

Also never heard of people bleeding air out forks before that sounds ridiculous. like someone else said riding your bike is way harder than riding in pick up truck tied down besides maybe seal burn. 

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Crank them down till the bars bend🤣I’m fortunate to have access to these custom-made ratchet straps They are built in  house by s local logging/ trucking rigging company. Some of the older pairs I have are 15 years old. They are very heavy duty and  make the hardware store variety look like cheap bra straps.3720DF90-4CDB-48B7-85F7-D277DF40D4AE.thumb.jpeg.4a74db4d6ea7f8f5f27a9505db8c2548.jpeg610FB53B-D622-4617-B67E-D302B975A5CF.thumb.jpeg.5217352e6eb3f826f4c54e36566dbd93.jpeg

Edited by Tackle Anxiety
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2 hours ago, Piney Woods said:

Overthinking is a dangerous thing!  Some crazy stuff here but whatever lets you sleep is ok I guess.

When it comes to takedowns on an object that compresses and rolls, no amount of securing tactics will ever fail you. I've had every stupid thing happen when cutting corners. Just sayin'

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9 hours ago, Piney Woods said:

Overthinking is a dangerous thing!  Some crazy stuff here but whatever lets you sleep is ok I guess.

I’m sure some of us are only transporting our bikes mostly on the highway to staging areas.  Others are actually traveling off road and or across country with their bikes on board. Whatever keeps it upright and or attached to your rig is probably a good thing. I just got in an off road race yesterday in my Subaru Outback on a Forrest Service dirt road with my KDX  on the back. I absolutely smoked two trucks with bikes in the back that thought they were going to show me how to drive.🤣 I never looked back. 

Edited by Tackle Anxiety
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