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48 minutes ago, ThumperHead said:

You had a rim with weights placed almost all the way around, that's a good noe done by Goober.

Now you know why I balance my own wheels besides zero damage to the alloy sides by pry bars considered normal damage at bike shops. Scroll doen to 10:00 minutes of this video and see if you see anything wrong with his process then do reply for others to learn not to do; 

Bend the heck out of that far side rotor.

The ziptie technique doesn't work on Bridgestone T31GT or Dunlop Roadsmart III, too stiff to pull the beads together. Michelin tires (as shown) are among the easiest of the 50 or so I have mounted the past 5 years. I have mounted Michelin PR4 fronts a couple times on my NoMar stand by hand, no levers. And one friend was watching when I put his Power 2 (? I don't remember exactly which but was the ubiquitous 120/70-17 size) over the rim by hand. The key is plenty of good lube, pinch the beads into the rim valley on 3 sides, and sometimes you can get the top bead to "roll" into the valley making even greater clearance to put the bead 180° opposite over the rim.

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1 hour ago, N4HHE said:

Bend the heck out of that far side rotor.

The ziptie technique doesn't work on Bridgestone T31GT or Dunlop Roadsmart III, too stiff to pull the beads together. Michelin tires (as shown) are among the easiest of the 50 or so I have mounted the past 5 years. I have mounted Michelin PR4 fronts a couple times on my NoMar stand by hand, no levers. And one friend was watching when I put his Power 2 (? I don't remember exactly which but was the ubiquitous 120/70-17 size) over the rim by hand. The key is plenty of good lube, pinch the beads into the rim valley on 3 sides, and sometimes you can get the top bead to "roll" into the valley making even greater clearance to put the bead 180° opposite over the rim.

Bingo! That was sickening to see that clown kneeing the heck out of the rotor. I bet it now wobbles and he'll tell the owner the rotor came in that way.  I was taught your able to mount tyres with lube, use your hands working smart mounting and if a stubborn at the last bit over the rim a few hits with the rubber mallet. One mallet end flat, other end ground then sanded down to a half sphere profile. Gallon bucket of tyre mounting snot my best friend.       

I noticed in a video maybe not this one the blue rim protectors sporting two finger holes, they ended up pulled off the rim being useless for rim protection from tyre irons. I've been using stiff plastic tubing slit the full length used as rim protectors along with a rubber sheet cloth reinforced preventing any contact on polished bright alloy 70's era BMW rims. I should have stock in $imichrome polish, lots of bright aluminum requiring polishing along with sore and black fingers.......~~=o&o>......   

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6 hours ago, ThumperHead said:

I was taught your able to mount tyres with lube, use your hands working smart mounting and if a stubborn at the last bit over the rim a few hits with the rubber mallet. One mallet end flat, other end ground then sanded down to a half sphere profile. Gallon bucket of tyre mounting snot my best friend. 

Yes! I used to mount tires on my knees, rim supported by wooden blocks, and used about 2 pound rubber mallet for the final stage. Now have a stand to hold the wheel waist high which lets me apply full body weight to the tire to coax it on.

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18 hours ago, N4HHE said:

Yeah but for only $22 Discount Tire did it for me. I have a large assortment of Marc Parnes adapters for BMW and others. Could have tried to make one of those work. Few months ago found the closest one was about 0.200” too small to do a Tiger 1200 rear wheel. Come next time am going to try wrapping a single strand wire in that space. Hard to explain other than it holds the wheel by the center opening which is very much like a car wheel  

Besides, the Subaru needed new shoes.

Concentric hub design. All you need is a aluminum sleeve that fits over your adapter centering the rim which looks like to be (guessing) (Yankee) 3/8" thick or app 9.5 mm thick at the hub mounting. One other required item a larger diameter plastic no better yet stiff nylon sleeves able to bridge over and lap the adapter, sleeve and over securing the hub. A why not use all four securing holes vs two.

Why not ID and OD michrometer measure what the clearance is and if lucky get brass stock in the exact thickness, cut to length and width then roll to a ring? That or better yet make a aluminum ring a simple lathe project? 

Companies manufacturing these "must have" adapters sure are proud reflected in pricing for simple parts. 

Airheads only at this hut, 61, 70, 75 & 76 vintage, 250, 750, 900 & 900cc's......~~=o&o>.......

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35 minutes ago, ThumperHead said:

Concentric hub design. All you need is a aluminum sleeve that fits over your adapter centering the rim which looks like to be (guessing) (Yankee) 3/8" thick or app 9.5 mm thick at the hub mounting. One other required item a larger diameter plastic no better yet stiff nylon sleeves able to bridge over and lap the adapter, sleeve and over securing the hub. A why not use all four securing holes vs two.

Why not ID and OD michrometer measure what the clearance is and if lucky get brass stock in the exact thickness, cut to length and width then roll to a ring? That or better yet make a aluminum ring a simple lathe project? 

Companies manufacturing these "must have" adapters sure are proud reflected in pricing for simple parts. 

Airheads only at this hut, 61, 70, 75 & 76 vintage, 250, 750, 900 & 900cc's......~~=o&o>.......

Marc Parnes sells a purpose made adapter for this wheel for $45. “But what is the fun in that?” IIRC the BMW opening is 60mm and Tiger 65mm. The lip is a little over 1/8” thick. Staring at it at the time I couldn’t think of a good shim material near at hand. Wanted some 0.090” aluminum plate but didn’t have any. Slept on it and realized a 10ga solid copper wire was practically perfect. Will try next time friend needs tire mounted.

The Marc Parnes BMW adapter’s 2 wing nut bolts clamp the center lip of the wheel. Do not go in the lug holes. 

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2 hours ago, N4HHE said:

Yes! I used to mount tires on my knees, rim supported by wooden blocks, and used about 2 pound rubber mallet for the final stage. Now have a stand to hold the wheel waist high which lets me apply full body weight to the tire to coax it on.

We get smarter in our old age and off the ground changing tyres. I have an antique hand operated bead breaker along with a scratch built giant looking vice and air ram that'll close applying 1,100 lbs force. Last resort the big rig tyre slide hammer whch is required to break Land Rover outside beads. Tyre shops have a 50/50% at best chance of breaking. https://www.amazon.com/Allstar-ALL10105-Standard-Breaker-Wheel/dp/B006K8G5AU/ref=asc_df_B006K8G5AU/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312061979255&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16523497868832267719&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9031977&hvtargid=pla-526391982636&th=1

https://www.amazon.com/Ken-Tool-35924-Impact-Bead-Breaker/dp/B00132AM7K/ref=asc_df_B00132AM7K/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=242044768796&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=8198899222240085421&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9031977&hvtargid=pla-570608919073&psc=1

Freebie tools from friends I helped over the years machining, welding or given a hand getting them out of trouble has it rewards. Proper tyre irons (aluminum material) ground down then polished surfaces another plus. Built a 36" round top portable table with a 1/4" thick rubber cover top as the tyre changing platform. Yes curved 4 x 10 pieces of wood elevating wheel, discs off the table. Bead breaking along with tyre mounting stands take up too much space plus I do not do a lot of tyre changes anyway. Most equipment available is cheap flimsy lightweight design or too expensive for home use. 

Oops must get stored bike parts out of the computer room before company arrives. I'm proud of the wheels, forks and fenders ready for bike assembly, wifey not so happy......~~=o&o>......

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6 hours ago, N4HHE said:

Marc Parnes sells a purpose made adapter for this wheel for $45. “But what is the fun in that?” IIRC the BMW opening is 60mm and Tiger 65mm. The lip is a little over 1/8” thick. Staring at it at the time I couldn’t think of a good shim material near at hand. Wanted some 0.090” aluminum plate but didn’t have any. Slept on it and realized a 10ga solid copper wire was practically perfect. Will try next time friend needs tire mounted.

The Marc Parnes BMW adapter’s 2 wing nut bolts clamp the center lip of the wheel. Do not go in the lug holes. 

I know they span across the hub and adapter joint and not secured by the lug holes. For $45 of ouch if my bike i'dmachine a aluminum collar just on principle to not pay for another adapter. It's a me thing like the intake spacers I milled out becase they do not exist and wow the results are impressive. Manual milling too many hours vs if I had CNC i'd mass produce and sell 'em......~~=o&o>...... 

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On 11/18/2021 at 9:42 AM, mmc205 said:

I place wheel weights opposite the rim lock, inside the wheel.  I typically use hot glue to give them a nice place to rest as the drop center is not flat.  After that, two wraps of duct tape/gorilla tape in place of a rim strip, then tube/mousse/tire, etc.  This has worked well for me for 1000's of miles.  As far as how much weight, i weight the rim lock, then use that amount of weight opposite the rim lock.  This method gives me vibration free tires up to about 80 mph on road.  the first post below gives an illustration of this method.

 

 

Those are lead, easily formed to the drop center with a ball pein hammer. That's what I do.

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On 11/23/2021 at 6:19 PM, Diverdown said:

Typically not on a dirt bike. But I've never seen nothing like this. Me and my buddy went riding 2 weeks ago. Took some dirt roads to connect trails. Back wheel on his KX-250 was bouncing like a basketball lol.

I've seen that on rear wheels with only one rimlock. I've always run 2 in the back, 1 in front. I started balancing the front about 25 years go... Tried the rear, but wasn't worth it with 2 rimlocks.

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