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How to find the pegs (or keep boots ON the pegs) in air?

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Had my first ride in 20yrs today ... on a MX track (among other trails, etc.). I bit the dust in a BIG way ... in the air (unexpectedly) ... couldn't find the pegs with my boots, came down front tire first, then CHEST ON HANDLEBARS. OUCH!!!!! :thumbsup: Had no control ... went straight down HARD. Laid there for about 20 minutes (after a friend moved the bike off the track).

I had no idea this was one of those 90 degree UP then DOWN jumps that if you do NOT want air ... you have to go over it VERY slowly.

While in the air, for what seemed like forever, I remember thinking "I can't find my pegs ... find the D!@#$$# pegs QUICK ... before I land". However, I didn't find them before landing. If I had .. I believe I may have had a chance at saving it.

For those SMALL jumps, etc. ... what is the technique used to ensure that your body doesn't float up and over farther than the bike? I was already leaning back and low (I have 10yrs mtn biking experience ... which does help).

This is a newb question -- but I really have no idea why I couldn't find the pegs. I assume I was farther in the air than the bike and/or my boots were behind or in front of the controls.

Any help is appreciated! I'll be sure to take your recommendations and "practice practice"! :devil:

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squeesze the bike with your legs more to keep your feet from floating off the pegs and make shure your feet are in contact with the pegs the whole time. If you do lose your feet on the pegs the straighten yours arms so there slittly bent and stay back on the bike cus the back suspension will take the hit bettr on time when i was trying a no footer of a big table top i couldnt get my feet on just dont hit your face or chest on the bars i got a little bit of a sore but thats it good luck with your 230f :thumbsup: my bro has the 150 tons of fun

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the reason you came off is because you werent ready for it. its all about how you take off. If you watch the take off you want to compress the suspension before the face of a jump and 'loft' off the jump with the bike. by compress all you really need to do is flow with it, crouch before the face so when you get to the jump you decompress with the suspension then pop off the jump. this way you and the bike are on the same level, if you need to bounce a jump you can sit back on the seat at the face and use the suspension to bounce it for more height. what happens is you just went right at it, when you hit the face it compressed the suspension for you, not ready for this it probobly buckled your knees a bit(or you kept them locked) then the bike launched you a bit in the air. crouching before the jump will let you rise with the bike instead of the bike rising you. clinching the bike with your legs is not neccessary if you do it right and it clinching will limit your movement in the air. some guys have different styles and use their foot on the number plate to control the bike, some keep them on the pegs, its really up to you. you really just want to flow with it. i dont have any good pics, i have this short qtime that i got off a digital camera of a small jump i made. hope it helps

http://filebox.vt.edu/users/maperez/drz/DSCN0123.MOV

if youve got quicktime you can scroll through the movie at your own speed. watch right before the jump how i bend my knees and right before take off i pop them. this particular jump had an unsmooth transition and liked to dump the front end because it doesnt decompress fast enough so i have to throw my weight really far back to level it out. jumps with very short faces will usually do this but longer face jumps will be much smoother and easier to control. It took all i had to keep the bike level throwing my 200lbs around.

have fun

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I think it helps when you are on the take off part of the jump to look where you are going to land, I think it helps you stay with the bike

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another thing i think that realy helps is to just roll over the jump once or twice b4 u jump it for the first time it gives u an idea of how the lip is and where your gona land :thumbsup:

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Thanks for all the tips! I didn't "mean" to take the jump -- believe me! I'm not ready for that large of a jump so soon. So, the air-time/jump was totally unintended. So, you can imagine my SURPRISE when I'm airborne!! :thumbsup:

I'll definitely use the tips suggested ... on smaller jumps and get it down better.

Besides, the 230F's suspension isn't really setup for jumps anyway .. especially with a 170lb person.

Thanks again! :devil:

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Are you the same guy who did the flying W in the 150/230 forum :thumbsup: ..... well what i do is right on the face on the jumps i make sure the arch's of my feet are on the peg.. dont put the bals of your feet becuase when you land it might be painful :devil: .... then kinda lean into your bike. get up on the front of it then when your air born re-move your legs and click your feet together over the handle bars and place them back on the pegs.... :awww: this comes later.. heh, i imagine if i tried doing it :lol::D:lol:

-red rider

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atleast you arnt scared, and your interested in what you did wrong so you can go back and fix it. way to be. alot of people are ready to "mellow" for a bit until they arnt so scared. just learn from it and read some stuff and you will be good, especially with that mentality. ride on....oh and bend your knees :thumbsup: i know you know that from mountain biking.

-rOOster-

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You may not have been giving enough gas and the back end bucked you up in the air. Happened to me if I didn't give it enough gas. Now that I've gotton better at track riding, it doesn't happen anymore.

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It helps to sqeeze your bike with your legs, so you don't get away from pegs.

Yes, the unexpected jump! That reminds me when the local track made a slight changed to their race track. I went out to the local track 2 weeks ago (once a week occurance),and almost experienced a major crash. By sheer luck, I am alive to tell the tale.

I started racing, without knowing that they changed a few sections of the track. I came arount the third corner and expected a tabletop, so I do the usual (pin the gas before the tabletop routine), by the time I got to the lip of the jump, behold!!! it's not a tabletop anymore, it's a steep narrow double. At the speed I was going, hitting the break was not an option. So I got cantapolted over a unfamiliar jump (SCARRY!!), and landed a little short, almost casing it. :devil:

The moral of my story: memorize every section of the track before applying throddle. Go around the track a few times to get familiar with the track, eventhough you think you know it!!! :thumbsup:

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.... cantapolted ...

:thumbsup::awww: :lol:Is that when a small round melon is launched over a castle wall? :lol::devil::D

Pretty funny, but could have been serious. Your track should tell riders with BIG signs when a track change is implemented.

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Grip the seat/tank with your knees/feet. This should prevent your boots from leaving the pegs and the bike from drifting sideways in midair!

Good luck

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the leaning far back and low. thats good for mtn biking, it aint good for motocross riding. you want to be upforward and seeing whats infront of you. Really good advice just grip the seat with your knees. Thats what I do sometimes but not all the time.

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