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How long does NiT works fork coating last?

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I heard only a few rides! 1400 bucks for that! And the showa works stuff wears out the coatings fast so 5000 bucks later you need 2000 to redue them (includes new rebuild parts plus $1400.00. Please anyone tell me this info is wrong.

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Are you talking about TiN coating or is this something different?

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On modifying the existing fork or shock, I have yet to get it to last.

The problem is getting it to stick, not the strength of the coating itself.

I am under the impression that if done within the manufacturing of the tube, it may be viable.

Lastly, there are far easier means of reducing friction at point gains greater than TiN and for certainly lower costs.

Put your mind to it, they're very easy to find.

DaveJ

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Lastly, there are far easier means of reducing friction at point gains greater than TiN and for certainly lower costs.

Put your mind to it, they're very easy to find.

DaveJ

Well, I put my mind to it, and I'm open to suggestions Dave.

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I have the works kit forks, they are two years old and the ti nitrate is perfect.

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TiN coating is excellent and very hard. If TiN is flaking off or rubbing off, then the process was poor to begin with. There are companies that do this process and do it very well. Just search the web. It will cost you a lot less dinero then have a third party involved.

Good Luck

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The problem is getting it to stick, not the strength of the coating itself.

I was looking into all this also so this is an interesting topic.

I am no expert and have no experience in this so take the following question with that understanding. Knowing what limited research I have put into the whole thing....

Refering to the quote above DaveJ.... Are you having the chrome removed first? I don't think it will stick otherwise. You need to get down to the steel and then coat to the proper thickness to get the dimensions in spec. thickness helps prevent flaking also.

And another question for you....

How much coin did it set you back?

There are also other similar coatings that have higher hardness and lower surface roughness than TIN such as TiCN. Color is usually a blueish grey I think.

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Hey guys, please go check out our website. www.miedosoracing.com I posted on the crf450 forum as well, so you can learn more about me there. you will be impressed with how Forslyk stacks up to Tit Nit. We believe it really is going to make Tit Nit obsolete in Motocross. Thanks

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TiN(titanium nitride) is an extremely hard thin film coating using the PVD(physical vapor deposition) process, hardness-as hard as carbide(that's why you get the gold colour) and excellent lubricity. If anyone thinks that appling some "snake oil" on your forks will get you the same results then........... :):)

I'm in the process of building-up a yzf750 and plan on TiN coating the tubes. Fighting friction on road race bikes is more important than a dirt bike. These coatings were meant more for short travel suspension. When your leaned over scraping your knee at +100mph in a turn you want to make sure your wheel is following all the imperfection of the track. That doesn't mean dirt bikes should not be coated, I'd like to do my wr250f also.

Understand that the forks are already a hard face chrome and the TiN is applied over the chrome. This process WILL NOT repair any nicks or scratches in the tubes.

I'm a tool and die maker by trade(toolie) and most of the dies coming from Japan have punches that are TiN coated. The cost of coating 1 punch ie 10mm x 30mm is $10 CAN. If you get yours done cut out the middle man.........this is the cheapest I've found on the net that looks like they know what there doing http://www.racinglinks.co.nz/titanium%20nitride.html

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Everyone can be skeptical, it is our nature.. But please stop saying this is a snake oil. All I can say is just wait and see. This is not a gimick, why else would we offer 100% money back. We know it works. Why else would ProAMA riders like Brandon Haas use it. Just remember, someday when you see Forslyk tested by Dirt Rider (they have been issued bottles, should be in next couple of months) Some of you spent over $500 to have Tit Nit done.

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stop with the spamming. Never heard of brandon.... go away.

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looks to me like a spray coating would last till i hit the first mud puddle, or my 2500 psi pressure washer hit it! :)

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My father and I have been talking about TiN and other better solutions for this process. Have any of you ever heard of Armoloy coatings? My father works in the plastics industry and the company he works for coats all thier screws and berrels with armoloy. He said for a part the size of a fork tube would be around 55.00 USD quite cheaper then TiN. Here is a brief description on this process.

-Armoloy utilizes proprietary chemical solutions and application processes that are carefully monitored to produce it's TDC, a silver satin matte chromium coating. Precise deposits insure fidelity to part contours and details without the edge build or "dog-boning" associated with conventional chrome plating processes. Armoloy will not chip, flake, crack, peel or separate from the base material under standard ASTM bend tests or under conditions of extreme heat or cold. Armoloy, being compatible with both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, allows maximum design selection of base materials. Aluminum, magnesium and titanium are not considered good candidates for base material selection.

-78Rc Surface Hardness

-Reduce wear and friction in moving parts

-Enhance corrosion resistance

-Absolute adhesion to basis metal - no chipping, cracking, flaking, or peeling

-Improved release characteristics in plastics forming tools - cores, cavities, lifters, pins, screws, plates

-Reduced Maintenance and part replacement costs

Let me know what u guys think

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