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speed wobble

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It feels the same as on a streetbike. The front end goes unstable and the handlebars start shaking left and right. Some riders use a steering dampner on their bikes (I have a Scotts on my sportbike, but nothing on my CRF450). I've gotten into moderate headshake on my 450 at speed in rocky sections, and to get out of it I pushed forward on both handgrips equally and added more throttle.

I ride mostly MX tracks now, and it's never happened there. If I rode a lot of those fast rocky sections, though, I'd probably spring for a Scotts on my dirtbike too. :thumbsup:

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I never get it on tracks but ive gotten it on some trails and its kind of scary escpially when you are flying

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I used to get it on my XR650, when running in softer terrain in 4th & 5th gear. That means from 45-75mph...it can get your attention :thumbsup:

A Scotts stabilizer took care of all of that. Some friends and I where going down a soft double wide trail, my buddy & I where riding side by side, I'm riding one handed, changing screen displays on my onboard GPS, and he's picking up the start of headshake...he gave me a hard time back at camp for showing off. He swore to get a stabilizer ASAFP (As Soon As Funds Permit)

He now has a 2004 CRF 450, which doesn't seem to be as prone to headshake as his DZ400 was.

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First a speed wobble is completely different then head shake

a wobble is due to the way the entire bike tracks in accordance to speed, suspension and setup

a wobble is more characteristic of street bikes, dirt trackers, dragsters or wide open in a desert. Many many items can be a cause.

Head shack can be caused by your triple clamps being loose, bearings shot, front end out of alignment or just the way a bike handles in sand loam and at no necessarily at speed either. Normally it happens when hitting a rut jump or obstacle.

Thats my opinion.

And yes a stabilizer helps

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I used to get it on my old KTM200exc when riding fast in sand but have never had it on my Yamahas :thumbsup:

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Having your suspension set up properly helps tremendously. Secondarily, having a stabilizer makes a big difference too.

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whats it caled when you land from a jump then the handlebars go back and forth really hard and when im coming out of turns if i like wheelie a little it wobbles really bad

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From my experience, weight distribution has a lot to do with it, besides frame geometry and even how wide your bars are. I used to race road bicycles and on long downhills would scoot back to where my chest was on the saddle, my butt over the rear tire, knees squeezed together and my hands gripping the bars right next to the stem. Great for aerodynamics, but I discovered one day, at a certain speed the front end starts to shimmy violently. I managed to save it, but I never employed that position again. Better to get to the bottom of a hill slower than to quickly get there not! :thumbsup: The steeper the head angle the quicker a bike will turn, but it also makes it more prone to head shake. And keep your weight forward!

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