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Riding heart rate?

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I think there has been a post about this before, but after doing a search I couldn't find it.

I was wondering if anybody knew what your heart rate is when riding? I've started to work out again and would like to set my heart rate close to that of riding when on the Elyptical machine or tread mill.

Thanks :thumbsup:

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I have a chart @ home of suggested rates - but I'm not at home right now. If I'm not mistaken, for my age (38), etcetera, my peak rate is like 160-180 bpm. Again, I'm not at home so cut me some slack if I'm off.

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Depends on the riding you do. if your going at it hard for a while expect at least 180 (thats just mine though) but if you really want to know, wear a heart rate monitor while you ride and check it after 10 minutes.

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your target heart rate is going to vary on your age, weight, and how hard you go at it..... :thumbsup::devil::awww:

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Hey, that's a cool idea. I'll try it out next time I'm riding.

Wonder if the motorcycle/ignition system will screw-up the communication between the moniter and the watch?

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Max heart rate is 220 bpm minus your age.

For cardio training, you want to be at or around 80% of your maximum.

For burning fat, you want to be at or around 60% of your max.

If you're training for cardio, I personally find that it is much better to do sprint type of work then something like jogging for 30 mins. What I would suggest is to find a road with lots of telephone poles then run for 5 minutes to warm up then stop and stretch. Now, sprint all out from 1 telephone pole to the next, then walk to the next one, then sprint, then walk etc. Try to do this for about 10-15 minutes. It will build up your endurance really quickly.

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my monitor worked. i had to find a way to get more endurance. 30 min motos are hard.

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Age 35, 190lbs, 5'9, max heart rate: 180, rest heart rate: 45.

I have a Polar (www.polar.fi , no. I don't work there) heart rate monitor that I've tried out sometimes while riding and allways when working out. It's super to know exactly what's going on with the body. Doing some studying I found out that to endure 25 minutes (MX) on a bike I could have 160bpm/avg and for 2,5 hours (enduros)i could have 150avg before all glucose in the muscles, liver and blood is used up. I put the monitor on the crosspad and use it also as a stopwatch. It's simple to slow down a little on a flat section and check to see if you're pushing too hard and how long you've been riding. It is very useful to get a feel of the optimum level of intensity for the specific type of riding. A non-rider friend of mine could not believe the tremendous intensity we ride at because "we just sit there and ride" :D He took a look at the monitor on the crossbar right before i took off and it read 110bmp, and I felt toootally relaxed. After the 25 min practice moto I came into the pits and he glanced over to see 175bpm :devil::awww::lol: I told him that when I was warming up the engine and just cruising the track to look around it was at 145. It's really weird, because if I work out normally I feel pretty winded at about 130, but on the bike that's nothing! After talking to people in the fitness business and explaining how we ride, it seems the extremely high heart rates while dirt bike riding is because we use most many of the body's large muscle groups, as compare to running when mostly the lower part is activated.

Anybody who is interested in their fitness would find a heart rate monitor tremendously interesting. It's funky looking at the blinking heart and knowing it's your life's pump tirelessly doing it's thing.

Statistics from some workouts:

-Daily calorie requirement: about 2300 kcal

-Long gym workout with one hour on the treadmill and 30mins of weights: 750 kcal's

-Regular day at the track using one full tank of gas/ 1 hour total riding time: 1500 kcal's

-2,5 hour non-stop enduro: 3000 kcal's

-full day "classic" enduro with checkpoints, transport sections, MX tests, fuel stops etc: 4999 kcal's :D:lol: No wonder it took a week to get back to normal!

I hope you don't mind the strong words in this description, but it's really something else :D:thumbsup:

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came across this old post, and signed up here just to comment: i recently did a 13 hour highway ride with breaks and all, and my heart rate was about as high as flat out running! 

 

motorcycle workout.png

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Max heart rate can be calculated but it's only close to accurate with something like 80% of the population, I'm 61/175 lbs. and my max is 195bpm

I ride single track and my heart rate varies with riding conditions and temperature but it's always higher than I care to get on my stationary bike

Edited by gitenby

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I've been thinking about putting my Garmin 500 on my KTM to record my heart rate when I'm riding.  I know when I'm riding hard, my heart rate is pretty elevated.  After racing mountain bikes for over 20 years, it's difficult for me to get my heart rate above 160.  According to my age (51), the general guideline for max HR would be around 170.  No way I'm hitting that any time soon.

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As other's have said 220 minus your age is a basic guideline, but it's different for everyone.   Most people don't have the physical / mental conditioning to hit their max heart rate.  I raced mountain biked and road bikes for a few years.  My heart rate was recorded for every training ride and race.  Because your heart rate lags your physical effort by quite a bit, it takes a very specific set of conditions to reach your max.   

For example, if I got on my bike and simply sprinted as hard as I could until I could go no more, that would only be a 1 or 2 minute max effort.   My heart rate would be relatively low because other physiological factors would cause me to stop before I reached my max.   To reach my max I'd probably have to do 10 - 15 minutes of warmup, then 10 - 15 minutes of hard work in the 80% - 90% range and then finally do an all out sprint for 1 - 2 minutes at 100%.

Most non-trained people do not have the mental discipline to reach their max heart rate.  Even when I was training with coaches and racing on a team, I'd rarely hit my max in training even when trying to.  I could get withing a few beats of it, but it takes massive motivation and mental discipline to dig that deep for that long through the pain.   We called it, "going to the pain cave".  Anyone who has not spent many hours trying to "go to the pain cave" will give up before they hit their max.   They may get withing 10 or 12 beats of it though.

You are delving into the interesting world of human performance.  Every human has a bunch of parameters they simply cannot improve.  These are genetics traits such as V02 max (your ability to process oxygen), your ability to process ATP, glucose, etc, etc,etc...  You can almost ignore those things because you can't change them.  Coaches look at them to determine a person's potential.  But for our discussion they aren't very important.  The parameter you are interested in is LT (lactic threshold).   LT is the amount of output you can sustain indefinitely.  Once you exceed LT you are on borrowed time. You will slow down and stop, or at least go down below LT.  The further you go above LT, the quicker that will happen.  LT is the most trainable trait you have.   It can be improved greatly to make you the best you can be within your genetic limitations.

I suggest you do some reading on how to determine your current lactic threshold and some training programs to increase it.   Cycling is a great tool for that because you can tailor your work effort exactly for people at any fitness level.  Thing like running are great, but for many people just starting training, it puts them over their LT very quikly  When they start running, they cannot stay below their LT long enough to really improve it quickly.  There is a ton of information out there about it.  Just do some searching on cycling, determining lactic threshold and how to improve it.

 

Doc

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Well said, Doc.  I always trained with my LT, which varied throughout my training season.  I'd usually do a 5 to 10 mile time trial to determine my LT, once a month.

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2 hours ago, Doc_d said:

As other's have said 220 minus your age is a basic guideline, but it's different for everyone.   Most people don't have the physical / mental conditioning to hit their max heart rate.  I raced mountain biked and road bikes for a few years.  My heart rate was recorded for every training ride and race.  Because your heart rate lags your physical effort by quite a bit, it takes a very specific set of conditions to reach your max.   

For example, if I got on my bike and simply sprinted as hard as I could until I could go no more, that would only be a 1 or 2 minute max effort.   My heart rate would be relatively low because other physiological factors would cause me to stop before I reached my max.   To reach my max I'd probably have to do 10 - 15 minutes of warmup, then 10 - 15 minutes of hard work in the 80% - 90% range and then finally do an all out sprint for 1 - 2 minutes at 100%.

Most non-trained people do not have the mental discipline to reach their max heart rate.  Even when I was training with coaches and racing on a team, I'd rarely hit my max in training even when trying to.  I could get withing a few beats of it, but it takes massive motivation and mental discipline to dig that deep for that long through the pain.   We called it, "going to the pain cave".  Anyone who has not spent many hours trying to "go to the pain cave" will give up before they hit their max.   They may get withing 10 or 12 beats of it though.

You are delving into the interesting world of human performance.  Every human has a bunch of parameters they simply cannot improve.  These are genetics traits such as V02 max (your ability to process oxygen), your ability to process ATP, glucose, etc, etc,etc...  You can almost ignore those things because you can't change them.  Coaches look at them to determine a person's potential.  But for our discussion they aren't very important.  The parameter you are interested in is LT (lactic threshold).   LT is the amount of output you can sustain indefinitely.  Once you exceed LT you are on borrowed time. You will slow down and stop, or at least go down below LT.  The further you go above LT, the quicker that will happen.  LT is the most trainable trait you have.   It can be improved greatly to make you the best you can be within your genetic limitations.

I suggest you do some reading on how to determine your current lactic threshold and some training programs to increase it.   Cycling is a great tool for that because you can tailor your work effort exactly for people at any fitness level.  Thing like running are great, but for many people just starting training, it puts them over their LT very quikly  When they start running, they cannot stay below their LT long enough to really improve it quickly.  There is a ton of information out there about it.  Just do some searching on cycling, determining lactic threshold and how to improve it.

 

Doc

Yeah - well thought out response Doc.  Those of us that train, race and compete on "pedal" bikes take a lot of this stuff for granted, but it was a long road to learn the ins and outs of training starting with Perceived effort, then HR now a powermeter.  I'm a huge advocate of Mountain biking for moto training, but (to your point) it is a lot like running, it can be difficult to stay under LT on most single track climbing trails for most guys.

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1 hour ago, Oregon Comrade said:

Yeah - well thought out response Doc.  Those of us that train, race and compete on "pedal" bikes take a lot of this stuff for granted, but it was a long road to learn the ins and outs of training starting with Perceived effort, then HR now a powermeter.  I'm a huge advocate of Mountain biking for moto training, but (to your point) it is a lot like running, it can be difficult to stay under LT on most single track climbing trails for most guys.

I agree that single track mountain biking can push most newer riders well over their LT just to make it up the hills and continue the bike moving.  But the huge upside of mountain biking is most people find it fun and are motivated to do it.  Effort is rewarded.  Doing the same amount of perceived effort on a piece of gym equipment is just brutal and effort is not rewarded.   

I'm amazed at the human body's ability to adapt.  Combine that with a fun activity like mountain biking and people just naturally get fit and strong all while just having fun and not worrying about the science behind it.  No need for HR monitors or power meters.  For the average Joe who's a couch potato that picks up MTBing or cycling in general, after 6 months of riding 3-5 times per week they will see huge improvements in their fitness.

Doc

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I remember years ago when I used to run with about a dozen buddies on crotch rockets going balls to the wall through winding back roads, straightaways ect...my adrenaline would be pumping so bad that when we pulled over for a break...my heart would be racing and skipping beats for awhile...lol

...That was then when I was young and stupid. When I'm charging through the woods now on my XR the only time my heart beats a little fast is when Its hot out and i dont stay hydrated. Riding off road hard on two wheels i find works out your muscles and cardiovascular especially in rocky terrain. There has been plenty of times I have come out of the woods with my shoulders and arms pumped..and feeling exhausted.

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This is actually something I'm interested in. I am planning on starting to do Enduros / hare scrambles in spring and at 48 years of age knowing what hr I should stay around to last 2 or more hours will be critical info for me I suspect. I spend my winters at the gym usually getting my body ready for the abuse the sport dishes out... the biggest thing for me is always my HR going through the roof when I am trying to ride fast then I usually pull over for a few mins and settle down. At the track thats fine but I want to stay consistent during a 2 hour hare scramble. I will defo be getting a chest strap type HR monitor so I can manage my HR during a race.

 

Just to add a week at the gym for me is..

Mon - 1hr Spin Class (tough class... hr is all over the map during)   Tues - 1hr Tabata (kind of like boot camp)   Wed - 1hr Power Bar Bell.   Thur - Spin Class again or I lift weights for 1hr.  Fri - Cardio on Elliptical (2 mins at low hr / 2 min at 75% / 1 min flat out. Repeat for hour). Also throughout the week I try to stretch as much as possible.

 

 

 

Edited by Stillhavetimeleft

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On ‎9‎/‎6‎/‎2004 at 11:40 AM, Radbuster said:

Age 35, 190lbs, 5'9, max heart rate: 180, rest heart rate: 45.

I have a Polar (www.polar.fi , no. I don't work there) heart rate monitor that I've tried out sometimes while riding and allways when working out. It's super to know exactly what's going on with the body. Doing some studying I found out that to endure 25 minutes (MX) on a bike I could have 160bpm/avg and for 2,5 hours (enduros)i could have 150avg before all glucose in the muscles, liver and blood is used up. I put the monitor on the crosspad and use it also as a stopwatch. It's simple to slow down a little on a flat section and check to see if you're pushing too hard and how long you've been riding. It is very useful to get a feel of the optimum level of intensity for the specific type of riding. A non-rider friend of mine could not believe the tremendous intensity we ride at because "we just sit there and ride" :D He took a look at the monitor on the crossbar right before i took off and it read 110bmp, and I felt toootally relaxed. After the 25 min practice moto I came into the pits and he glanced over to see 175bpm :devil::awww::lol: I told him that when I was warming up the engine and just cruising the track to look around it was at 145. It's really weird, because if I work out normally I feel pretty winded at about 130, but on the bike that's nothing! After talking to people in the fitness business and explaining how we ride, it seems the extremely high heart rates while dirt bike riding is because we use most many of the body's large muscle groups, as compare to running when mostly the lower part is activated.

Anybody who is interested in their fitness would find a heart rate monitor tremendously interesting. It's funky looking at the blinking heart and knowing it's your life's pump tirelessly doing it's thing.

Statistics from some workouts:

-Daily calorie requirement: about 2300 kcal

-Long gym workout with one hour on the treadmill and 30mins of weights: 750 kcal's

-Regular day at the track using one full tank of gas/ 1 hour total riding time: 1500 kcal's

-2,5 hour non-stop enduro: 3000 kcal's

-full day "classic" enduro with checkpoints, transport sections, MX tests, fuel stops etc: 4999 kcal's :D:lol: No wonder it took a week to get back to normal!

I hope you don't mind the strong words in this description, but it's really something else :D:thumbsup:

I hike, run, mountain bike, and dirt bike and see similar results as above. I wear a Garmin Vivo Active HR and it does a very good job of measuring my heart rate. Since it is a watch I wear it all the time. Many people report that the watches do not work well.  I have not seen this. I tell everyone I see to get one. The simple fact is you do not cheat it. If you don't do the work you won't burn the calories and you know it immediately.  

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On 9/5/2004 at 9:25 PM, Optik said:

Max heart rate is 220 bpm minus your age.

For cardio training, you want to be at or around 80% of your maximum.

For burning fat, you want to be at or around 60% of your max.

If you're training for cardio, I personally find that it is much better to do sprint type of work then something like jogging for 30 mins. What I would suggest is to find a road with lots of telephone poles then run for 5 minutes to warm up then stop and stretch. Now, sprint all out from 1 telephone pole to the next, then walk to the next one, then sprint, then walk etc. Try to do this for about 10-15 minutes. It will build up your endurance really quickly.

Optic has it right.  But that's really just a guide.  You can work up to a level above those recommendations.  Back in the day, there was a study by one of the MX magazines.  The top guys were running at 170 to 180 for a 20 min moto plus 2 laps, and had a resting heart rate of 60 or less.  Back in my late 50s, I would stop and do a quick check, and I would be in the 160-170 range.  I'm still here... not riding that hard lately, but still here.

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