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Teaching a kid to ride

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Not sure I have the right forum here but here goes anyway. I've got a 5 yr. old girl that has been riding a PW50 with training wheels for the past six months. Now we want to get rid of the training wheels. Only problem is she can't balance. I've been working with here on a bicycle with little progress so far. Right now I've been having here coast down a slight incline and have her trying to go further and further without putting a foot down. Anyone know some tips for teaching a kid to balance? :thumbsup:

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I've taught 3, and they all have there own pace. Be patient and she will get it. I'd be willing to bet she's in no hurry. Working on a bicycle in an area with a slight incline seemed to be the easiest method. Good luck & enjoy the experience.

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Go to www.wheels4tots.com They have some tips. I saw a trick that uses a 10" bicycle with the pedals removed. You lower the seat as low as it will go and remove the crank assembly. You have the child scoot or coast with their feet only.After awhile they get used to keeping their balance ( in theory). I am trying this with my 4 yr old girl right now.Only I am letting her coast down a small slope in our yard.I only removed the pedals,not the crank,chain,etc. I let her get balanced with her feet down, and then tell her to raise them and coast to me. At first she could only go a couple of feet,but in just a couple of days she is going much farther. I let her put her feet down as often as she wants. I figure this will be good practice for riding in the dirt anyway.She seems to be well on her way. :thumbsup:

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klz,

I'm doing the same thing. I removed the whole crank and letting my son push it around. The other day he coasted for about 20 yards for the first time. As soon as he proves to me that he can ride on two wheels, a 50 will be in the garage.

Make sure that you don't push her. I tried that and my son just didn't want to ride the bike. It takes the fun out of it for them. Just let her progress at her own rate with a little encouragement.

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Will do. It's all up to her. She has new crf 50 hidden in the garage for when she is ready! :thumbsup:

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Once she learns the 2 wheel bicycle, the 50 will be a snap. The secret is patience. :thumbsup: My son was 5 and it took weeks to teach him. My daughter is 3 and from following around her big brother, she learned to ride a two wheeler and it took a matter of minutes for her to pick up on the 50. Each child is different. Just be patient and make it fun for her.... good luck :devil:.

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How about moving the training wheels up some so they were still on but touch less and less as they get better.

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How about moving the training wheels up some so they were still on but touch less and less as they get better.

exactly what i was thinking that would let them get used to the bike leaning and still know it wont they wont fall.

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IMHO you should NOT expose any child to riding motorcycles until they have at the very MINIMUM mastered riding a bicycle without the use of training wheels. What is your rush !! How will you feel if your kid seriously injures him/herself (paralyzed) on a motorcycle that YOU have put them on. Don't you think there are more years of riding to be done AFTER your kid learns to ride and is OLD enough to handle the necessary responsibility involved.Theres so much more than just balance you should be concerned with. In ALL of the literature I have read from the manufactures concerning this very subject, they make it perfectly clear concerning what your childs abilities should be BEFORE you expose them to motorcycles. Why do you ignore these facts and place your child in jeapardy for your own selfish reasons. Is having your child riding a motorcycle so important to you that you risk his/her future ??

It's this type of ADULT behavior that starts the lawsuits that keep manufactures from wanting to build stuff for kids.

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I have a 5 year old that has trouble on his bicycle so I thought that the PW50 would be helpful. The theory here was that he would not have to pedal and would be able to more readily use his feet for balance. To that end I removed the footpegs so he would not run over his ankles with the footpegs. It has seemed to work pretty well and I have put the footpegs back on. He does not quite use them yet but he is using his feet for balance less.

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Any body that puts their kid on a motocucle before the same kid has mastered a bicycle is inviting GREAT risk on their child. The only reason this happens is for the needs of the parent........ No other.

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Right now Ive been teaching my little 5 yr old brother how to ride his PW 50. When he first started riding it (approx a 1/2 year ago) he had training wheels on his PW but He still struggled riding it. So we decided that we should let him learn how to ride his bicycle first and not letting him ride the PW until he was able to ride his bike well(w/o training wheels). Well that went on for about a month maybe a month and a half. So the past weekend I let him ride his PW 50 (w/o training wheels) and he was able to ride it as if he were riding his Bicycle. He is doing VERY well right now and he's ridden it about 4 times since he started riding it again. It takes patience though. And PLEASE dont be one of those mini dads that are hard on their children, MX or whatever style riding is supposed to be FUN! Good Luck!

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How about moving the training wheels up some so they were still on but touch less and less as they get better.

That's how I learned.

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IMHO you should NOT expose any child to riding motorcycles until they have at the very MINIMUM mastered riding a bicycle without the use of training wheels. What is your rush !! How will you feel if your kid seriously injures him/herself (paralyzed) on a motorcycle that YOU have put them on. Don't you think there are more years of riding to be done AFTER your kid learns to ride and is OLD enough to handle the necessary responsibility involved.Theres so much more than just balance you should be concerned with. In ALL of the literature I have read from the manufactures concerning this very subject, they make it perfectly clear concerning what your childs abilities should be BEFORE you expose them to motorcycles. Why do you ignore these facts and place your child in jeapardy for your own selfish reasons. Is having your child riding a motorcycle so important to you that you risk his/her future ??

It's this type of ADULT behavior that starts the lawsuits that keep manufactures from wanting to build stuff for kids.

I agree with coeshow. That being said, I had a JR50 for my son before he could ride a bike. I bought the Wheels for tots training wheels and was very happy with their product.

Back to the original idea of the thread...We backed off of the motorcycle (after I bought it of course) until he learned how to ride his bike very well.

I took him to the park on several occasions and would give him a push to get him going. He would go about 10 feet and flop over, with his feet still on the pedals.

Back to square one...maybe he should know how to stop and put his feet down at the same time. We trained there a few rounds. Back to the park...

After he was comfortable with stopping, I would run along beside him with my hand on the back of the seat. I wouldn't let him fall until I was completely out of breath and had fallen first (this happened a lot).

I finally had run out of energy on one of the last passes and let go without telling him. He rode about 40 feet. We were both pumped! I did it again without telling him I had let go. I ran along beside him just like I was holding the bike (he didn't know I had let go). He finally came to a road in the park and stopped. This ride was about 100 yards! People were watching and cheered for him. :thumbsup:

He was amazed to learn that he had done it all himself, with just a little encouragement (and a sneaky bastid for a dad). After that he had to learn how to master taking off all by himself without a push.

All told, he learned what a goal was. He learned that sometimes he has to "get the idea" on his own.

I learned some patience. I learned to listen to my wife a little more (Honey, are you sure he is ready for a dirt bike?). I also learned that I am WAY out of shape!

No matter what decision you make, this is YOUR child and no one can change your mind about what is best for him or her. Just gear them up as much as possible (especially when they are learning a new skill) and have fun.

I didn't mean to turn this into a sermon :devil:.

Regards,

Chuck :awww:

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I just told both of my boys, I was going to give them a spanking if they put their feet down....needless to say, they picked up the balance thing pretty quick... :thumbsup:

I am obviously kidding, but I did push them a little bit into pushing their own boundaries. I think it's a pretty natural thing. I don't think that it's always a bad thing to apply a little bit of pressure on your kids. Just my .02....rekless :devil:

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Make sure they can touch the ground with both feet and let them drag their feet for a foot or so before they put them on the foot pegs when they start. They can also put their feet down a little early and drag them some when they stop. They can use the front brake to stop while their feet are on the ground. I also use soccer cones to setup a salom course for them to practice balance and speed control.

I have two sons ages 7 and 5 years old. About a year ago I bought the oldest an XR70 and the youngest an XR50. They both had wanted dirt bikes for a long time so I thought it would be better for me to buy them dirt bikes and teach them myself instead of them jumping on one of their friend's dirt bike and getting hurt. I started out by teaching the oldest to ride the XR50. I explained what every thing was on the dirt bike and when and how it should be used. Especially the brakes. I had my oldest son creep along in 1st gear with his feet dragging and would tell him to stop about every 10 yards. Once he proved to me that he was clear on how to use the throttle and the brakes, I let him go around the back yard in a large circle and I ran behind him. After a day or so he did this on the XR70 without any problem. Soon he was riding fairly well in an open field where I could see him at all times. At that age they don't realize how fast they are going and I spent a lot my time reminding him to slow down. Next I put training wheels on the XR50, adjusted the throttle stop to govern the throttle and started working with my youngest son. I made sure that I never rushed either son as they were learning to ride. In fact there were times when my youngest son was just not interested in riding, so I let him do other fun things like throw a football while the oldest rode his dirt bike. It takes a lot of patience to teach young people how to ride. I spent a lot of time discussing safety, answering questions, and I also made sure they always wore the proper safety gear. After about two weeks of practice my youngest son learned how to use the throttle and the brakes pretty well but still depended on the training wheels and my help when riding. I spent about a year running behind my youngest son to make sure the training wheels didn't cause him to tip over. Then one day about a month ago he told me he was ready to try his dirt bike without the training wheels. I was supprised how well he did the first day I took them off. I helped him a little at first by putting my hand on the seat and telling him when to start and when to stop. In about 30 minutes he master starting and stopping on his own. Next I stood about 10 yards in front of him and asked him to ride toward me and to stop and put his feed down when he got to me. He mastered that in just a couple tries. Next I put out soccer cones and made a small slalom course. He went through it with very little trouble. I made it fun by changing the course after several successful passes. We worked on going around cones in the back yard for about three days and then I took him to my father's farm. Now we all ride together including my wife on her four wheeler. The youngest is confortable riding in second gear now and follows me and my oldest son around the pasture. I found that every child may learn to fide at a different pace. In my opinion safety is the most important thing to teach young people and teaching them to the proper way to ride requires taking one step at a time. The training wheels allow them to practice using the throttle and the bracks before they are able to balance the bike, but does little to teach them how to balance the bike. In fact the training wheels may even slow down the process for learning to balance the bike, but who cares as long as they are having fun.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

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Anyone know some tips for teaching a kid to balance?

I think those Razor two-wheel scooters are great for teaching kids balance. I tried teaching my daughter how to ride a bicycle when she was almost five...tried all the tricks but she just wasn't ready. About that time all her friends were riding scooters so she put the bike aside and started riding hers. Six months later she decided she wanted to try her bike again...her first try she took off and never looked back. It seems the scooter really helped teach her to balance...braking was another story. :cry:

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I have a son & and is now on a KX65 and is learning to ride wheelies and can jump 35 feet. I have a daughter4 who now rides a JR50 she can ride standing up and start and stop all on her own.

He started at age 5 also on a jr50 but he could ride a bicycle pretty well. I would put him on a small incline hill and push him down. He had it in about 20 mins.

The girl is a diff story she could ride the bike and the 50 with training wheels. She already had great throttle controll but did not want to pedal the bike. So I put the throttle restrictor in the 50 and slowed it to a crawl got every type of safty gear on her and pushed and ran besides her. over and over and over. I think repetition is the key.

Also I believe they have to have the desire. My two eat sleep and breath bikes and ride for an hour every day after school and on the weekends.

Just restrict the bike to crawl and they will have no problem. Just do yourself a favor buy a neck collar..chest protectors leave ugly marks under the chins of little ones.

Oh and alot of praise even if they are not doing it so well...just my .02...

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