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front washout and falling tecnique

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Everytime my front end washes out and I go down I get a headache.

This weekend I think I finally figured out that I hold onto my bars until my bike pile drives me into the ground.

So, now I'm thinking that maybe this is a no no. (I think it's some kinda holdover I have from staying with the bike when you crash.... meaning jumping though).

Anyway, I was watching this BMX stuff yesterday evening (Top 11 or something like that) and the number 1 guy (can't remember his name) apparently never gets hurt and obviously falls ALOT and potentially hard. The falls I saw him taking he went belly first with his arms kinda spread (I'm probably overgeneralizing here).

Anyway, got me curious if y'all have any kind of "method" that you've kind of adopted (whether intentionally or not) of going down when NOT jumping and if you've been able to conciously make a decision NOT to do something when you fall to avoid getting hurt as bad.

Also, anybody ever practice falling?

My 3 year old son is always practicing falling on his pedal bike. He intentionally dumps the thing and rolls around on the ground etc. I've never told him to do this so it cracks me up but wish I had the nads to do this (even if I was sitting still).

Eddie

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why don't you stop washing out the front end?

once i learned how to use the front brakes to enhance cornering traction, i stopped washing out as often. now it only happens occasionally, and it's mild enough to either save it with a foot dab, or just stand up as the bike goes down. that whole falling down on the ground thing doesn't look like fun to me.

mw

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where are your forks set at in the top clamp? Maybe you need to raise them up a bit. Raising them helps reduce the chopper front end washouts.

You do actually place yer nads on the tank when you sit down right? You should see no seat when you look down after sitting. The crack of yer but should sit on the outside corner of the seat, not on top. You want your back more vertical than leaning with the turn with your sholders almost over the bars. look at the exit of the corner, then look down the track. looking at where the tire is will make you lose control rapidly. What ever leg is on top use that knee to push down on the shroud.

but above all get up on that tank and make sure your braking is done before you sit. then you can lightly feather the front brake to keep the wheel planted.

oh yeh, practice cornering on a hard dusty surface. get that down, and nutting will plant you.

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I learned several years ago that I was no match for a 250lb motorcycle in a fist fight. I don't wash out often but when I do I always ride the high side peg until the bike completely wipes out and then step off and run a couple steps to keep from falling.

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just by feathering it you can keep it planted better. A light feathering drag on it. It works especially well for keeping the front tire in a rut too.

I believe it helps to keep the forks compressed, keeping the tire biting more down than out like a chopper tire does.

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just by feathering it you can keep it planted better. A light feathering drag on it. It works especially well for keeping the front tire in a rut too.

I believe it helps to keep the forks compressed, keeping the tire biting more down than out like a chopper tire does.

compresses forks and weights front end. just make sure you get the hard part of the turn done before the fork starts to rebound. once it starts rebounding it's washout city for me.

mw

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Velosapiens/YZ250F rider-

Thanks for the tips. YZ250F, yeah I make a conscious effort to get forward on the tank (some of your VERY old posts got me working on that and it's drilled in my head) BUT I still don't always do it. Have a lot of other techniques stuff that I'm trying to pull together and I don't always make myself get forward like I should... though I am getting better.

The front brake stuff is interesting to me.

I've been thinking lately that on a MX bike, maybe the ultimate goal is to NEVER be fully on both tires and being able to instantaneously make the bike get on which ever one you need it to get on.

Like the whole seesaw thing.

Bias towards the front (off throttle or on front brakes or clutch) and front traction. Bias towards rear (on rear brakes and throttle to get front light and rear traction.

My prob was/is knowing when to make the transition from weighted front to light front... I was kinda assuming it would be at the apex of the corner.

Now for long sweepers this would be different and maybe that's where I should start working the front frake and throttle together to keep the front diving and grabbing through the sweeper? But, I'm also on the rear with the gas cause it's choppy acceleration bumps.

So, I suppose there are times when you want to be on the front brakes, gas, and rear brakes when accelerating.

I'd also tried to get a lot of the dive out of my front forks when I put on the front brakes by adding compression, but maybe I need to relook at this and allow for some dive. Maybe I've gone to stiff and or I'm rebounding too fast.

Anyway, just now (because of your posts) I'll be rethinking cornering a little.

Eddie

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Sasquatch-

That sounds simple enough. Now, if I can only do it.

Wrestling a 200lb bike is what I think I'm also coming to realize as a lost battle. The challenge is to figure out when to let go and give it up.

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you know I meant to ask you about your forks. the rebound should be a trade off between packing on hard whoops, and front end washouts.

make it rebound slow and it will help keep the forks compressed for the corners, but go too slow and they will pack up on you in the whoops. You can also vary the compression setting too.

The way I taught myself was to sit down while just puttering around on a straight run. Registering in my mind how the shrouds felt on my thighs and the movements it took to get on the tank.

Eventually if you make a conscious effort to remember how the shrouds feel on your thighs and the movements it took to get on the tank as you are sitting down your body will guide you down without thinking just by how it feels. And it will be repeatable, muscle memory is your friend.

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eddie,-velo is correct---you have got to learn to stay on the binders all the way through the corner,--the brakes are the only thing that keep you stuck in the dirt ( the rear realy pulls and holds the ft down)-one thing you can keep in mind is when your going to let off the brakes you have got to be there with the motor----keep pushing you braking farther and farther and this will show you how much faster you could have come in -----you should have enough momentum comming in that you have to use the brakes even after you have started to get back in the motor,---there can be no coasting,------these race bikes are designed to always be under power or be under braking or both at the same time-----they just dont work trying to coast through a corner with any speed ---they will push out and you will go down---------

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Technique?

I simply get up off the ground, dust myself off and check for cuts and broken bones. Washin' out usually hits me so fast I don't have time to think... just react.

I tried a Dunlop tire once... yes once... washingest tire I've ever had.

:thumbsup:

Wash

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Velo, YZ250F, Kelstr, everyone-

Thanks for the tips. Started practicing today on some of the suggestions.

Unfortunately it's difficult for me to type right now cause I dislocated my shoulder today.

Nothing too bad but I'll have some time to go over your suggestions in my head over the next few weeks.

:thumbsup:

Eddie

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Everytime my front end washes out and I go down I get a headache.

This weekend I think I finally figured out that I hold onto my bars until my bike pile drives me into the ground.

So, now I'm thinking that maybe this is a no no. (I think it's some kinda holdover I have from staying with the bike when you crash.... meaning jumping though).

Anyway, I was watching this BMX stuff yesterday evening (Top 11 or something like that) and the number 1 guy (can't remember his name) apparently never gets hurt and obviously falls ALOT and potentially hard. The falls I saw him taking he went belly first with his arms kinda spread (I'm probably overgeneralizing here).

Anyway, got me curious if y'all have any kind of "method" that you've kind of adopted (whether intentionally or not) of going down when NOT jumping and if you've been able to conciously make a decision NOT to do something when you fall to avoid getting hurt as bad.

Also, anybody ever practice falling?

My 3 year old son is always practicing falling on his pedal bike. He intentionally dumps the thing and rolls around on the ground etc. I've never told him to do this so it cracks me up but wish I had the nads to do this (even if I was sitting still).

Eddie

First of all make sure you have top quality tires on the bike set at about 12 psi. I use Pirelli MT16 & MT83 fronts and MT16 rears.

Next Check your preload. You should have about 100 mm rider sag set in.

Reduce your compression dampening a bit on both ends to enhance your tire contact with the ground.

Set well forward in the turns, head over the Handlebars and your foot out at front axle. Not on the ground except to save a slide.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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I may be misunderstanding the original question or this discussion. I have always saved a front end washout by getting on the gas and taking weight off the front end. This allows the front end to rehook up and then you can back off slightly to stop the rear end slide you started by getting more on the gas. I do understand that more weight on the front will help with front end traction but once it starts washing out you need to do the opposite! Just my opinion and experience saving front end tucks. :thumbsup:

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