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Feathering clutch "technique"

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Just really stared experimenting with this to make better power and hold lines better when coming out of and going through corners.

By the way I'm not coming off of a 2 stroke so have no experience there.

When y'all corner and feather WHY are you doing it?

Seems like you could be using it as a front brake of sorts which would keep you in a particular line but why use that over the front brake?

Also, I know it allows you to carry a higher gear through a corner but for me right now the constant on off seems to slow things down (speed) through the corner.

When you are feathering, I'm assuming you're keeping the throttle pinned or at least at constant throttle (not letting off because you pull in the clutch like you do with a car)... seemed like when I was messing around that this made the most sense for whatever reason.

Then, when you're feathering it with the gas on is it a on off thing with the clutch MANY times through the corner to get through it and hold your line (on "brake" off "brake") or is it more like bump it one time to accomplish what you're going after.

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I feather the clutch in corners mainly for that 'little extra control,' but it helps the most on the exit of the corner so i can clutch it up into the power :thumbsup:

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you have got to be smooth with all the 5 controlls ----you cant go on and off and on and off with any of the controlls through a corner or down a straight,--------you leave the clutch out while downshifting and under braking comming in to a corner to help keep the engine braking help keep the chassis hooked up to the dirt and when you gently sit and start to get back on the gas while still braking you may have to slip the clutch gently to keep the motor in the power to pull third gear ------but you work all the 5 controlls very gently and smooth and you are operating all 5 most all the time in every kind of combination possable to keep the chassis smooth and to keep traction !!---never pump or on off on off any of the controlls , you will never be able to hold a line or keep the chassis still.--

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Here's a clutch trick that I learned from a *very* fast friend a few weeks ago. He rides a CRF450 like mine, just a heck of a lot faster!

When you are finishing your braking into a non-bermed corner and are getting hard on the rear brake, you will probably be pulling in the clutch to avoid stalling the engine as the rear tire goes in and out of locking. The trick is to start feeding in throttle and clutch while you are still on the rear brake -- you transition between braking and accelerating with some overlap between the brake and throttle.

This really helped me a lot in slippery flat corners, because it keeps the rear end locked up with the dirt, and helps keep the bike settled at the transition. It takes some practice, but you can really feel the difference in control in slippery corners.

Give it a try this weekend, eh? :thumbsup:

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I SECOND THAT :thumbsup: feels great out of a corner leaned over crossed up. I used to do this out of corners without knowing it and my friends would say how awesome it looked. i said what the corner?

as was said, feathering meerly gets the revs up and puts you where you want to be in the power band. not needed as much on four strokes but a great skill to have. also helps control power slides

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i thought your not supposed to feather the clutch on a 4 stroke? i thought that was a two stroke thing. Every mag i read says NOT to feather the clutch cause itll burn up the clutch real fast.

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you slip the clutch on any bike to pull the tallest gear you can comming out of the corner to keep the motor pulling ,to keep traction under controll and to make the apply of power smoother and to help braking pivot turns -----it dosent matter what kind of bike it is ----2 or 4 stroke ---road racing or motar---mx ---single track-----the clutch is a very usefull tool ----it is used for everthing but not shifting---------you have to disreguard just about everthing you reed in the raggs !!!!

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You also want to be smooth with the clutch. As not jerky, and through the hole turn. To have your back tire in the back of your mind with the cluth. example is if you dont want too much wheel spin in a hard patch turn, and want hook up ect ect. Its all matter in what turn,how the dirt is, and so many other resions. :thumbsup: Hope this helped, :devil:

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I use the hell out of my clutch on the yz426f and so did the guy before me and am learning to use it more and more, same clutch that was on it when it was bought too. thats 4 years ago :thumbsup: burn this out :devil:

if you burn them out i guess the clutch that was on the bike probably really sucked or something. either that or mine is really damn good hehe

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I feather the hell out of the clutch '04 yzf450. This is skill i'm constantly working on doing mostly woods riding/hare scrambles. Love to really push it and hear the engine being consistant through really varied terrain. This seems to be the key over this stuff. It also does wonders for Steep rough hills. I did however burn out the plates after 1 year of riding. weekends here and there. So they do burn our for "everyman" but easy to replace.

what do you think?

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I've been riding for about 2 months now on my yz250f and feel this is a great technique. It has helped me out immessureably through burms, especially the 180 degree ones that i was slow in, and flat corners as well

I sure as hell like it a lot better than not using it

Someone said my clutch is "slipping" a little bit but that it is good for a while

Im not too sure what this means since i havent been riding long but it feels the same to me...

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According to the MX Action ten commandments of 4-strokes: "Thou shall not feather the clutch." Or something to that effect. They say it's much better to dump the clutch and use the 4-stroke torque, otherwise you'll waste your clutch.

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Yes it is faster to dump the clutch. U cant ride a 250f like a 125 constantly clutching it or you will wear out the clutch. The clutch is smaller and its also under a lot more strain. In some instances its good but not all the time. When i use mine a lot it gets soft. and there is a lot of play in it. Not the best idea. Dump it.

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Faster you go the more money it is going to be. Faster everything is going to wear,better the bike has to be, and ect. If you look at any turns RC, and Mattbwalker, to whom ever riding a four stroke. There riding on that clutch. Just the way things are. :cry: :cry: :cry:

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very true you have to carfully work and slip the clutch as you also carfully apply and slowly release the brakes and as you very carfully sit in turns ------you must be very smooth with all that you do ------you cant dump the clutch and or hop on the seat when sitting or lock up the brakes ,-------all this does is upset the chassis and slow you down ----------you have to use all 5 controls in every possable combination and yes you slip the clutch carfully and smoothly no mater what kind of bike it is !!!

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Whatever you do don't dump the clutch in the corner. Feeding the clutch to smoothly control your power will result a much smoother controlled cornering technique. If you don't abuse your clutch, slipping it in corners will have minimal affect on clutch wear(I have a magura hydro clutch which I feel has helped my clutch life). I've been on a 4 stroke since my 99 yz 400, race as many weekends as I can(2 to 3 a month), and have never "fried" a clutch due to using it in corners. Remember to change your oil alot...

Steve

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for all of you slipping the clutch i have one word for you. Morons. All you need to do is pull the clutch in once or twice real quick with one finger and if your engine dies your in to high of a gear.

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It's not about keeping the engine in the powerband, it's all about controlling smooth traction. Think from the tire contact patch down, not what's above it.

I learned a huge lesson when racing 125s. I was trying to master a flat, hardpacked turn by riding it again and again. At the end of the day my friend's dad offered that I could try their YZ125 - but cautioned that the clutch was slipping.

Yeah, it slipped quite a bit. And I got through that turn quicker and smoother on that dog of a bike, than I had all afternoon on mine.

Smoooooth is the keyword.

Of course you have to replace your tranny fluid often - on my KTM125 I replace it every ride. On my CRF450... I'm doing the same, every ride.

+sean

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