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I asked this question before, but. . .

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Okay, I need to know EXACTLY how much "feel" or "friction" I need to check valve clearances? Do you go all the way til the gauge won't go in and then take the one before, or do you have some type of resistance to look for? It's almost as if with all that oil on the valves and stuff, that I can't make up my mind what feels "right" and what doesn't. Any advice or tips? Thanks. :thumbsup:

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..but what? You didn't pay attention in the first post? Someone said on here that it should feel like pulling a feeler gauge out of the middle of a large book (like a phone book). This is a pretty good analogy, but I think that would be plenty if not too much friction to base a comparison on. Now, granted, I don't have ANY experience on checking CRF valve clearances, but have used a feeler gauge on many other machines over the years, and here is my take on the matter: If the surfaces are oily, then the friction should be only slight enough to feel a drag in between the two surfaces. Think about it, if the space is lubed, than ANY resistance felt at all, is an indication that the gap is definitely being filled, and the measurement is close, if not smaller. So, in conclusion, when measuring clearances of lubed surfaces, little to almost no friction should be felt when moving the feeler guage. :thumbsup:

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I don't have ANY experience on checking CRF valve clearances

But. . .

So, in conclusion, when measuring clearances of lubed surfaces, little to almost no friction should be felt when moving the feeler guage.

Okay, that's refreshing. Kind of like all the answers I got on my last post, that's why I asked NICELY for a more thorough explaination. . .

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I don't have ANY experience on checking CRF valve clearances

But. . .

So, in conclusion, when measuring clearances of lubed surfaces, little to almost no friction should be felt when moving the feeler guage.

Okay, that's refreshing. Kind of like all the answers I got on my last post, that's why I asked NICELY for a more thorough explaination. . .

Gee...sorry to waste your time with my post. I can now see why you didn't get many replies on the first one. :thumbsup:

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MY understanding is, if you can get a feeler gage in between at all, you are larger than the gage that is in there. A machinist buddy of mine says if the .005" goes in with resistance the clearance is say, .006". You can't fit a .005" gage in a .005" gap without seriously forcing it.

As if that made any sense...but I know what you mean, I just fit it until I get one that goes in "medium" as n some drag but not a hard shove, but you don't want it to just fall in either...

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therapture's freind is right. But before anyone lays awake at nite sweating over .001" here's something to put it into perspective. Anyone remember the old SL-series Hondas? Their valves were set at .002" cold. That means when warm, there was no clearance at all and they put up with all manner of abuse without a hiccup.

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therapture's freind is right. But before anyone lays awake at nite sweating over .001" here's something to put it into perspective. Anyone remember the old SL-series Hondas? Their valves were set at .002" cold. That means when warm, there was no clearance at all and they put up with all manner of abuse without a hiccup.

And they made what?40 HP per liter?I'd think the CRF's valve clearances are a little less tolerant than an ols Sl's.Anyway I like a tight drag on the median spec for my bikes.

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See, that's why I'm so confused when it comes to spec'ing valves! It almost seems to be a "subjective" decision on what's the right amount of friction, etc! :thumbsup:

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Tim, I wouldn't sweat it this much. If you can't get the spec size feeler to fit in between the clearance, your valves are too tight. Theres a point where you can't even force the next bigger size in. The spec allows for one thousanth loose or tight of the spec, so tension is a moot point as long as the spec gauge fits and the next size up doesn't. If the next size feeler gauge up fits, you need to go up one size on your shim to get it perfect. Let me know if this helps.

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It seems as if several sized bigger gauges fit. I'm assuming I need bigger shims, but I just wasn't sure whether I stop at the point the gauge doesn't fit and go one size down, or go by "feel" which seems to be very subjective.

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You want a slight drag on the feeler. Sure there's a larger gap unless it's a real tight fit with the feeler but the specs are for checking them with a feeler with a slight drag.

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This is the response that would most closely resemble mine. You know what drag feels like. Use varying sizes of feeler gauges. You will know if you need to reshim, and about which shim.

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