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Teaching someone how to ride better

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I have been asked by a couple of people just this past month if I could help teach them how to ride better/faster. I am only a "B" rider and one person that I would be teaching is a beginner who has only been riding 8mos. and has been racing for about 7 months. The other, I think has only been riding a few months and is only 7 years old. His dad just wants me to teach him how to ride better and use the right techniques so that he can start racing soon. Both of these people ride hare scrambles. Any advice from someone who has taught other people how to ride and use the proper techniques? Anyone have a list of things that would be good to work on with a beginner? I know that the one who has been racing 7 months wants to get better in corners especially. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!

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umm to teach someone else to ride hmm.. i guess watch them... i haven't taught someone how to ride pro or anything like that but i have taught my girl how to ride and my bro how to ride better... with amy (my girl) it too a lot and a lot of patients but i always just rode behind her and told her why she was experiencing the stuff that she was.. but with her it was because she is soo dang timid.. haha umm yea watch them jump do they get slow down too much before the lip.. are they standing i dunno maybe take a video camera and record there jumps especially ones that they are having problems on... that way you can watch with them and explain what they are doing wrong. good luck

XpReSS

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Get some video tapes on learning to ride and do what they do. I'd suggest making an outline so you don't forget something that the student will really want to know. Then take your outline and a clip board and checkoff each thing you go over so that a) you cover everything, and :thumbsup: you cover them in the correct order. (Good luck with that second one. :devil:

I'd suggest putting the bike on a stand and going over the controls first.

Also make sure they understand each step before you move on to the next.

Most beginners want to speed into riding, and most good teachers have to hold them back so they don't get hurt etc trying to do something they are not ready for.

Good luck,

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After 37 years of riding and racing I've had the expierience of teaching ALOT of people to ride My method has always been to get them into the slower more technical stuff first, this teaches them balance,brake,clutch,body position,control,ect., plus if they crash It'll be at a slower speed. Of course this goe,s against what most new riders want to do!!. They want to haul A$$ and show how good they are!! :thumbsup:!!. Get them to learn how to control the bike in tough situations and then let the speeds move up!! :devil:

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For the part about cornering...I know what helped me alot is to make the kid ride in a figure 8 and never let his feet touch the ground...everytime that they do then thats 5 push ups...truse me he'll learn...and just have him do the figure 8 over and over until hes cumfotable on going through corner like that.

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1. Young or old, these may be your best riding buds in the years to come.

2. Keep #1 in mind.

3. When 1 & 2 fail, hazing is the best way sometimes. From my experience, group hazing has a better affect. (on me)

4. Pick one thing to focus on. Brake slide, standing in the trees, sand whoops, wheeling and body position. Not all at once, go through the same section and coach em.

5. Have fun. You are riding. Let em know you can't do it all day, you will need to rip it up without em. Take a loop and see if they want to go out when you get back.

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