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Give D. Rudder some respect.

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I see D.Rudder commenting regularly on your questions.

My problem is people seem to debate with him when he gives sound advice.

When you reach his level, when you can ride with him on trails, maybe you can do what you want, but until then realize that he is someone whose advice you can trust.

I don't know who all these people are that write in telling you how to ride fast and safe, and I'm guessing most of you don't either.

Quit debating with him and listen.

OK, I'm done.

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Well I apoligise for the people that are confused about certain topics and come to this site to ask questions that they know will be answered for them, and trust the information that is given to them.

My 2 cents

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Steady,

I understand that everything goes down the drain backwards where you live :thumbsup:, so let me restate what was apparently misunderstood.

My compaint isn't with the people that ask the question but with those who debate the best answer with Mr. Rudder.

I think it's great that people ask questions, but, personally, I don't care how good a rider someone thinks they are when there are people and events that prove the quality of Mr Rudder's advice.

I'm not trying to win an argument, I'm just trying to be clear. :devil:

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I'm more than happy to follow DRudder's advice. Bring it on. I'm such a newbie, I'll listen to anybody - even mathprof (in a pinch).

But do we have to respect him, too? IMO, if'n he hangs out with you guys, then he won't be getting much respect. :thumbsup: Larry

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There are so many wonderful things that we can learn if we choose to listen with our ears instead of our mouths. We are so lucky to have easy access to experts thanks to the internet and sites like ThumperTalk. I for one, am very grateful to those who take the time to share their knowledge and experience with us. Thanks Dwight! :thumbsup:

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There are so many wonderful things that we can learn if we choose to listen with our ears instead of our mouths. We are so lucky to have easy access to experts thanks to the internet and sites like ThumperTalk. I for one, am very grateful to those who take the time to share their knowledge and experience with us. Thanks Dwight! :thumbsup:

Hey Dwight

I would have more respect for you if you would be our Guest at WCTT4 and give us a riding Clinic :awww::devil:

May 27th - 30th 2005 Forest Hill Calif...

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I see D.Rudder commenting regularly on your questions.

My problem is people seem to debate with him when he gives sound advice.

When you reach his level, when you can ride with him on trails, maybe you can do what you want, but until then realize that he is someone whose advice you can trust.

I don't know who all these people are that write in telling you how to ride fast and safe, and I'm guessing most of you don't either.

Quit debating with him and listen.

OK, I'm done.

I'm sick of taking about it, I just want to ride with the man sometime! When's the clinic Dwight?

:thumbsup:

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I have respect for anyone who achieves success at a high level in a given sport, and I will listen intently to all their suggestions offered.

I think there is often more than one method to be used successfully to achieve positive results in a given situation. Is it wrong to respectfully offer an opposing point of view? No two people are at the same place in terms of their riding ability, style, size of bike used, stregnth, terrain ridden, etc, so is there only one "perfect" answer to a question posed? We are all on a different part of the learning curve. One thing I like about this board is the variety of opinions expressed, coming from people with many levels of experiences or lack of. I appreciate and I am grateful for the commitment given by an expert to guide and offer opinions in helping us, but I also enjoy the opinion of all others who post.

As long as we are respectful of each other, what's the problem with longer explanations offered, additional questions posed or the debate of a given topic?

Please appreciate the nature and intent of this post.

Respectfully,

Gus

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Gus, well put. Reading some of these topics and their associated responses brings to mind just how different riding conditions are in various places. I think one thing that would be helpful would be if people state where and what kind of riding conditions they ride, in addition to their suggested riding style or position.

For example, standing position. If you watch a video of Brian Brown or Ty Davis flying accross the desert WFO you never see them sitting while doing that. In the slower more technical situations you do. I grew up riding in the desert. So, I am use to standing a lot. Now, I ride less desert and more mountain stuff so sit a lot more but still stand for many conditions and situations. So, it all depends on where you ride and so on.

There are some basic pricipals that apply across the board. Things such as riding with your elbows up and out away from your body. Scooting up on the tank in the attack position when cornering and so on. These skills translate very well for the average trail rider and therefore apply. Each person is a little different. So, once the basic techniques are learned then it is up to the individual to adjust as necessary to be comfortable for them. To coin a phrase "there are many ways to skin a cat."

When Dwight or anyone else gives their advice or opinion, it is in reference to where they ride and the kind of riding they do. At least, that are my thoughts on the subject for whatever they are worth.

You said, "Please appreciate the nature and intent of this post." Very respectfully, I do. :thumbsup:

I think we can all learn from each other. Those with the most experience such as Dwight and possibly yourself can act as mentors to the rest of us.

:devil:

Paul

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I wish Dwight would ride less and post more. He was around alot in the Yamaha forum about a year ago. Switching from Honda and was exploring other brands. He is blunt, opinionated and very, very experienced. Old school in alot of ways. I think he's great, would love to meet him someday. :thumbsup:

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Welcome Dwight - thanks for spending the time to answer our questions and give us some insight. The stiffer rear brake spring "trick" works GREAT, and I adjusted too it fast and make rear rotor is happy now. I am very impressed that I think you stated you just turned 49, this is an great inspiration as I just turned 48 and have been riding since the early 70's. Perhaps you can give me some advice (motivation?) - as it seem I am turning into a spood, I have the skill set but just can't keep focused from turn to turn and make blunders, am less aggressive, and endurance is lacking. I ride a mountain bike 2X a week, eat well and am not over weight.

Thanks!

MSTex

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Perhaps you can give me some advice (motivation?) - as it seem I am turning into a spood, I have the skill set but just can't keep focused from turn to turn and make blunders, am less aggressive, and endurance is lacking. I ride a mountain bike 2X a week, eat well and am not over weight.

Thanks!

MSTex

I would recommend working out 3X a week and as far as focus. Sometimes I talk to my self ( some times yell ) to go go go, Faster. Do this and you can't be thinking about what you need to be doing in the yard at home or some situation at work you want to get away from.

Try being a bit more aggressive in your corner to corner speed.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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I agree and I'm 48 and am overweight! I ride mtn and road bikes about 3x a week, but I like to eat more than my share too. I don't get out on the WR any where near as much as I would like--it is such a long drive to the trails and the wife's honey do list keeps getting longer!

In addition to what Dwight says, I ride with my fast kid but I don't admit I can't hang with him (he knows!). You will start riding faster. Yell out loud--"hey--wait up! Try to yell when they are off the gas going into a corner or they won't hear you!

When you start going real fast, don't think about yard work--just think--" better slow down now because this might leave a mark if I crash in these whoops!"

Keep riding the mtn bike--but only ride it on single track. I really helps me with endurance--I ride my mtn bike a lot more than my son rides his and we go on a trip up north riding--I can last longer than he can--so I still in pretty good shape at the end of the day to BBQ and drive home!

Gosh--to be young and have today's bikes......

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Rudy, sounds familiar with a couple of exceptions. I'm a fiew months shy of 50, not overweight, but out of shape. The kid is faster than me and we both know it, the guys I ride with are faster than me and they know it. But I don't think any of them enjoy the ride more than me. Just don't have the nads to ride scared for very long. No slouch just not youthfully fast. Common sence has taken precidence over competitive spirit, and that should keep me riding for years to come. :cry:

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