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Pinched nerve in neck

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I think I have a pinched nerve in my neck. Everytime I move my head to the right, looking over my shoulder, I have this soreness. Anyone know how to cure this.

I have thought about a chiropractor and have gone to Bowen Therapy one time but am uncertain if this is the correct call.

Speaking of Bowen Therapy, anyone done this. I tried the one session as it was a "gift" but am not sure if it will provide positive results. Seemed a little weird.

At any rate, how do I get my neck better?

MIR

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Do you have pain shooting down your arm?? Pinched nerves are pretty painful not just sore.

I've had good success with chiropractors but I know lots of people who haven't.

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Yeah, pain from pinched nerves often goes down your arm. It could be arthritis pain in your neck, and that might not radiate anywhere. How long have you had the soreness? Short term could be muscular also.

I'd try heat packs, ibuprofen, & massage first. Watch what you do with your head, how you sit at your computer, the support you get from your pillow, heavy backpacks over one shoulder, that sort of thing.

Give the ibuprofen a try for at least 3 weeks before you give up on it. It takes time to help a chronic problem.

If all that fails and the problem limits your activities in some way, see an orthopedic surgeon. Seeing a surgeon doesn't mean you will get surgery. They will probably refer you for an epidural steroid injection first. Depending on the severity of your underlying problem, that might be all you'd need.

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See a Chiropractor, this is what I do for a living. You really haven't given enough info to give any kind of diagnosis. If the injury is acute (within 48-72 hours)do yourself a favor and don't use heat just yet. If you want to pm me I would be happy to give you some advice.

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I had to check out what Bowmen Therapy was, I've never heard of it. It sounds a little bit like Acupunture without the needles, using pressure points. Did you feel any relief after treatment?

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The soreness does not go down the arm, so maybe not a pinched nerve. I have had the soreness for about 2 months or so. I woke up one morning and felt like the hunchback of notre dame. The lasting effects have been the neck. When I turn to look over my right shoulder it is sore. Like a "charlie horse" type of sore.

The bowen treatment was weird and it helped for about 2 hours than the soreness came back. The Bowen Dr. stated it would take 2-3 treatments to have lasting effects. This may be correct, but I am leary. I also admit I am leary about chiropratics, as I have never gone to one before.

MIR

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Go find a Chiropractor. You have friends that go to them, go ask them who they recommend. Your fear is normal, but you will see it's not a big deal. It may be a pretty simple fix.

Unfortunitly I don't know any Dr's. in your area to recommend you to. I know a Dr. in Chico who's good, but I'm sure there are plenty of good Chiro's in your area too. Keep me posted. :thumbsup:

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Sounds like your back/neck is out which in turn makes muscle spasms. Having someone work on acupressure points will help. There are different ideas about how to help with this. Some believe you must first release the muscles in order for your back to go back to normal; others believe you should first get your back to normal and then the muscles will release.

:thumbsup:

I prefer the work on my muscles first and then adjust my back. Usually as they are working on my muscles you can hear my back/neck adjusting itself. Then they just finish up with whatever hasn't adjusted itself. I’m also very emphatic about “YOU WILL NOT RIP MY NECK AROUND!!” .

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Mike, go to the DC inside of the Roseville Health & Wellness center near Rocky Ridge and Eureka. The guy is really good. I can't remember his name for the life of me, but he's a really good Chiropractor. I have been to at least 6 Chiropractors that I can think of, and this guy is near the top of the list that I've visited.

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Not to offend anyone here, but is there any science behind chiropractic? I'm more than a little cynical because a friend of my wife's went to chiropractic school. To say she is not intelligent is being kind. Yet now she calls herself a doctor. She can't explain the theory behind chiropractic, but she goes to alot of continuing education about how to extract more money from her patients. Is that all there is to it? That and a good massage?

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“Look well to the spine for the cause of disease”

-- Hippocrates of Ancient Greece, widely regarded as the Father of Medicine

Better yet Stanky, is there any logic to modern day western medicine? Chiropractic is proven worldwide every day. What more "science" or "proof" need there be other than people being relieved of their symptoms and maladies. There's plenty of hard evidence also in before and after X-rays, wherein proper curvature of the spine and proper alignment is restored.

You wanna talk about shaking down patients? Traditional MD's are the masters at that game. I can't believe people out there still doubt the efficacy of Chiropractic. I'd venture to guess that there isn't a factory rider out there that doesn't see a Chiropractor regularly.

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This article from a leader in the field of chiropractic illustrates my point. He hammers home two ideas quite well: (1) It doesn't work, and (2) We need to make more money!

September 2004

A challenge and three myths

by Dr. Christopher Kent

A long‑term challenge that has attracted recent attention is that only a relatively small percentage of the population visits chiropractors. This is a complex problem that merits careful attention. Sober thought is required before investing in a "magic bullet."

Utilization is declining for several reasons. One is the perceived narrow scope of chiropractic (back and neck pain). A greater problem deals with a desire to "integrate" within the medical model, positioned as a treater of NMS pain. This guarantees the DC a very limited, subservient position, as in the VA and the DoD.

A second problem is declining reimbursement, and "insurance‑driven" care plans by insurance‑dependent DCs. This problem is fueled by the perception that chiropractic care is a "treatment" for a "condition" that should be covered by insurance, rather than a lifestyle/health service to be paid out of pocket.

Reimbursement is likely to worsen following the Trigon debacle. A federal precedent clearly establishing that it's OK to pay DCs less than MD and DO providers is sure to make a bad situation worse.

What solution can work? We must seize the wellness opportunity, and manage its PR potential, thus repositioning the public perception of chiropractic from a disease treatment/insurance‑dependent/episodic model to a wellness/cash/lifetime model.

There are three prevalent myths that are barriers to developing effective strategies to resolve our current situation:

Myth #1: Chiropractic care is a scientifically proven approach to low back pain.

Some chiropractic leaders have suggested that low back pain should be our point of entry into the health care system. They frequently base this opinion on the premise that there is sound, incontrovertible scientific evidence that chiropractic care represents a superior approach to low back pain. In actuality, the evidence is equivocal, at best.

First, manipulative therapy is not synonymous with chiropractic care. A growing number of practitioners, particularly physical therapists and osteopathic physicians, are offering this service. While adjustment of vertebral subluxation is a unique service provided by chiropractors, spinal manipulative therapy is a "common domain" procedure.

In addition, the scientific evidence supporting manipulation as a treatment for low back pain is equivocal. A recent review [1] sought "To resolve the discrepancies related to the use of spinal manipulative therapy and to update previous estimates of effectiveness, by comparing spinal manipulative therapy with other therapies and then incorporating data from recent high‑quality randomized controlled trials.

What did these investigators conclude? "Spinal manipulative therapy had no statistically or clinically significant advantage over general practitioner care, analgesics, physical therapy, exercises, or back school... There is no evidence that spinal manipulative therapy is superior to other standard treatments for patients with acute or chronic low‑back pain."

And what of the claim that chiropractors offer more effective manipulative treatment for back pain than other providers? The authors note, "(P)rofession of manipulator...did not affect these results."

Myth #2: 80% of the population suffers from low back pain.

Another reason for promoting a "back pain treatment" identity is the claim that 80% of the American population suffers from low back pain. Thus, they reason, since few of these patients need surgery even by medical standards, if we sell ourselves as "back pain doctors," our market share will soar.

According to data from a recent study at Duke University [2], roughly 13% of the adult population reported suffering from pain in either the low back or upper back. Previous authors have suggested much higher numbers, but these were generally "best estimates."

While some have disputed the number in the Duke study, it appears that the oft‑cited 80% figure is exaggerated.

Myth #3. Back pain is the second leading reason for physician visits.

The third myth also sounds compelling from a marketing perspective: "Only the common cold causes more people to seek the services of a doctor than back pain."

Waddell [3] notes that "This has been repeated ad nauseum in the introduction of papers about back pain until it has become a kind of creed... It comes from an old paper by Cypress (1983), using data from 1977‑1978 and questionable diagnostic coding. It gives a very false impression."

A 1995 study [4] paints a very different picture. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey ranked mechanical low back pain as the fifth leading reason for a physician visit. It trailed hypertension, pregnancy care, general medical exams and wellness care and acute respiratory infections. Low back pain accounted for a mere 2.8% of office visits.

Put another way, more patients saw a doctor for exams and wellness care than mechanical low back pain!

Finally, a recent article in The New York Times [5] listed back pain as the eighth leading reason for a medical visit.

It should be clear that any strategy based upon promoting chiropractic care as a treatment for back pain is not only flawed philosophically, but also makes no sense based on the evidence available in 2004.

Is it any wonder that we are losing market share by promoting the notion that our services have value only to persons suffering from a short list of spinal pain syndromes? If only 13% of the adult population suffers from back pain, and it accounts for a mere 2.8% of physician visits, is it any wonder that we are losing our market share in the health care industry?

The sad thing about this is that the public is desperately seeking leadership in the wellness area. They are seeking strategies that will improve their quality of life, regardless of whether or not they have identifiable ailments.

Our target should be 100% of the health care market.

Beware of "pied pipers" offering magic bullets based upon faulty assumptions.

References

1. Assendelft WJ, Morton SC, Yu EI, et al: "Spinal manipulative therapy for low back pain." Cochrane Database Sys Rev 2004;(1):CD000447.

2. "What are the costs of treating low back pain?" The Back Letter 2004;19(5):56. Based upon data from Luo X, Pietrobon R, Sun SX, et al: "Estimates and patterns of direct health care expenditures among individuals with back pain in the United States." Spine 2004;29(1):79‑86.

3. Waddell G: "The Back Pain Revolution," 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone;2004.

4. Hart LG, Deyo RA, Cherkin DC: "Physician office visits for low back pain. Frequency, clinical evaluation, and treatment patterns from a U.S. national survey." Spine 1995;20(1):11.

5. Kolata G: "Healing a bad back is often an effort in painful futility." The New York Times. 2/9/04.

(WCA Vice President Dr. Christopher Kent, president of the Council on Chiropractic Practice, is a 1973 graduate of Palmer College of Chiropractic. The WCA's "Chiropractic Researcher of the Year" in 1994, and recipient of that honor from the ICA in 1991, he was also named ICA "Chiropractor of the Year" in 1998. He is director of research and a co‑founder of Chiropractic Leadership Alliance. With Dr. Patrick Gentempo, Jr., Dr. Kent produces a monthly audio series, "On Purpose," covering current events in science, politics and philosophy of vital interest to the practicing chiropractor. For subscription information call

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Well, all I know, is when I go to Chiro one leg is longer than the other and when I leave they are the same length.

Also, when I go, I can't turn my neck all the way to the left and when I leave I can.

How's that for scientific?

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Are there idiots in the Chiropractic profession? Of course there are as well as any other profession. Why this gal could not explain the principle of Chiropractic is a mystery. Stanky1 have you ever been to a Chiro? I know first hand what we can and can't do as a Dr and as a patient. I also see a huge number of patients come in after they have already had back surgery and are worse off then when they started. Do you know that over 100,000 people die each year to medical negligence? That's only whats reported, I'm willing to bet that number is grossly under estimated. Like I said before, there are clowns in every profession.

You are absolutely correct that Insurance companies are decreasing there coverage for Chiropractic care and many Chiro's are doing whatever they can to make up the difference. I feel these Dr' cheapen the profession.

I only briely read the report you added to this discussion and think most of these points of this article are bogus. I'm also willing to bet you've never even stepped foot into a Chiro's office. I have changed the minds of many who now know the benefits of what I offer, is this because I'm a smooth salesman, no I couldn't sell water to a man dying of thirst. it's because I made a difference in there conditions.

We could find articles all day long with the use of the information highway on the pros and cons of just about anything, but instead of jumping on the bandwagon of something I don't believe you know anything about, why don't you try and form your own opinion. For every negative thing you here about my profession you will hear twice as many positives if your willing to hear them. :thumbsup:

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No, I haven't been to one. Haven't needed to see anyone for any medical problems. A few good friends have been, though, and some continue to go to chiropractors. Some are satisfied, some are not. I'm sure this is true of any of the healing arts.

Your point about idiots in any profession is well taken. My wife's friend is certainly one of them, and the only real close contact I've had with anyone in your profession. She has made comments (repeatedly) that the foundation of chiropractic rests on the fact when one is dealing with acute problems, "nearly anything can work" and "80% of people will get better anyway." She says this in a joking way, but you can tell she believes that this is not far from the mark. She is all about the money. So's the guy who wrote the article. They make the rest of you look bad in my book.

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Well, all I know, is when I go to Chiro one leg is longer than the other and when I leave they are the same length.

Also, when I go, I can't turn my neck all the way to the left and when I leave I can.

How's that for scientific?

Congratulations on your study with a sample size of one.

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Well, all I know, is when I go to Chiro one leg is longer than the other and when I leave they are the same length.

Also, when I go, I can't turn my neck all the way to the left and when I leave I can.

How's that for scientific?

Congratulations on your study with a sample size of one.

My point is: it works for ME. Just like ANYBODY who goes to ANY doctor will have GOOD and BAD experiences. You know as well as I do that is FACT. Just as some medical doctors are TOTAL pieces of CRAP. A lot of chiro's are crap.

Anybody who's have had family deal with cancer or mental illness know, they don't have the answers. They just know that some things will work sometimes and sometimes they don't. And they don't know WHY.

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Anyway, if you are uncomfortable with going to a chiro find a massage therpist. You sound like you have a lot of muscle issues and if nothing else, it will relax your muscle and feel good.

Oh, and STRETCH!!

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Anyway, if you are uncomfortable with going to a chiro find a massage therpist. You sound like you have a lot of muscle issues and if nothing else, it will relax your muscle and feel good.

Oh, and STRETCH!!

Are you talking dirty to me, or are you giving advice to Mike_in_roseville?

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Anyway, if you are uncomfortable with going to a chiro find a massage therpist. You sound like you have a lot of muscle issues and if nothing else, it will relax your muscle and feel good.

Oh, and STRETCH!!

Are you talking dirty to me, or are you giving advice to Mike_in_roseville?

Sooooo, sorry. I'm giving MIR advice.

:thumbsup:

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