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another suspention clicker question

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I know that there are many variables to the suspention clickers but I was wondering what others use. Mine is factory right now. What are the riders in the 155 lb range using for about 50% on 50% off road settings?

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same problem ...off road only.. skitish at the front bouncy at the back running 14psi tyres weigh 230lbs

if you wind up the compression what should you do with the rebound and vica versa

i cant tell if im running to hard of soft with the settings im using it for every sort of terrain..im not a fast rider thre must be some clicker experts out there

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I couldn't tell you guys where to start because my suspension is not stock anymore. I don't even know where my clickers are as I adjust them til I get it working just the way I like it.

Generally, what I do with the clickers is....

If I increase the compression (stiffer) I also tighten the rebound (slow it down) and vice versa (soften compression, speed up rebound) The idea is as you increase the compression, the suspension will not go as deep into the travel so you may not need as much rebound to let the suspension decompress. This is assuming you have balanced the compression and rebound on the front and rear to your riding preference.

The compression should be set up so that it will bottom out 2-3 times during a ride (off-road). This will ensure you are using all of your suspension travel. Then set the rebound so the bike doesn't bounce up quickly off something like a G-Out or Whoops. Be careful not to slow the rebound too much, otherwise the bike will start packing in whoops. This keeps the suspension from decompressing all the way before you hit the next bump. At this point you are part way through the stroke in the suspension and has less travel.

If the front or back kicks up when you hit a little bump, like a rock sticking out of the ground about the size of a street curb, your rebound may be too fast. This can also do the same thing if the compression is too stiff so the suspension can't soak up the bump. Also, if the compression is too stiff you may get hydraulicing (spelling?)where you feel a spike in the suspension where it locks up part way through the travel on a hard hit. You will definetly feel this feedback. Almost like you bottom out but sooner in the travel than you are expecting.

If you pay attention to the feedback the bike is giving you it will help you decide how to counter it by clicking. Make adjustments 1 - 2 clicks at a time. Then test ride it. If you know of a section that you always have a known problem, ride over it, bust out the screw driver, make a quick click, and ride back over it.

Other suspension adjustments could include Sag (which is where you should start), fork height in triple clamp (affects high speed stability and steering), and fork oil (both weight and amount). Good luck.

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Minky.....if your suspension components are stock, with your weight, your going to need at a minimum some stiffer springs. I would also recommend a revalve. I just had my suspension done and that's the best money I've spent on this bike yet. :thumbsup:

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Thanks DoubleDRZ. That info helps me understand things a little better. I gunna use this info on my ride this weekend. But it wont be much of a ride cause I'm getting geared up for bow season. This bike has me torn between my 2 loves. Riding and bow hunting. But I have incorperated it in scouting :thumbsup:

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thanks drz man ill have to get out on my own ..no one wants to hang about while i mess with my clickers

perhaps i should bet the bear man to shoot a arrow in my butt to speed me up a little

why do women always close thier eyes when you make love

.. because they hate to see you having a good time

cheers

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Fred_Bear,

You need to make a mount for the Bow so you can take the bike into the back country. This way you can enjoy both sports. :cry:

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After you make the initial adjustments, it doesn't take too long to make the fine tune adjustments on the trail. I put a small flat head screw driver on the inside of my boot. When we stop for a quick break I pull it out, click - click, and shove it back in the boot. This may take a whole 30 seconds.

Once you take the time to get things adjusted in, you will be a much happier and confident rider. As you get better, the suspension will continually need to be adjusted as you will get use to hitting things harder and faster.

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