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need fitness suggestions....now have access to a kick ass gym

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I race 125B but have never really done any fitness program...after moving out of C I relized I'd need to in order to keep the pace in B. I recently joined the gym at my college...it looks pretty sweet with tons and tons of equipment. Thats great and all but I really don't know what I'm doing :thumbsup: actually I have no clue when it comes to this stuff. At the beginning I would especially like to concentrate on my shoulders because both have been dislocated within the last year. Could someone give me some suggestions or sites to get me started. oh btw I'm 19, 6'2" 150 pounds

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Ask at the College Gym desk if they have someone to help you with a basic orientation/program.

Stick to the BASICS at first. Most people, who don't have proper training, make basic errors in their program.

Stick with a whole body program at first with less exercises. Upper/lower body programs are fine for people who have training experience and are dealing with time constraints (e.g. a whole body program takes too long for them) but they must be able to recognize that they need to work the muscle group every 2-3 days (note- this is a general statement). Often I speak to guys who say they have plateaued (got stuck in a rut) who do Uppr/lower programs but are only hitting the muscle group every 4-5 days. They'd be better off making their programs less complex and even dropping some exercises and working a muscle group more often.

Remember, it takes awhile before you can safely (note that safely word) get to a higher weight program. Stick with an endurance program 12-18 reps (2-3 sets) for at least 4-6 weeks before attempting higher wts/ lower reps. After you have some gym time under your belt you can then start to move more towards a strength/endurance program (8 - 12 reps)and make it a little more sport specific (add wrist flexor, hip add/abduction exercises, traps, the shoulder stuff, etc...).

Make sure you have someone explain to you what "going to challenge" is, and then eventually "going to failure". Doing those things are the key to a truly successful program- not "lifting 20 every time". In order to make gains you must progressively challenge your muscles.

You're smart to want to work your shoulders, they're usually overlooked (as well as the lower back and ankles) and yet they're the things most likely to take you out. Rotator cuff and medial/posterior delt work is important stuff.

Lastly, do the cardio too, it's an important component of overall fitness (especially for this sport). Learn how to use a heartrate chart (or better yet monitor) to dial your workout in. Just as going to challenge/failure is integral to a wt workout, working out in your heartrate zone is important to top end cardio workouts.

Enjoy your gym and take advantage of the opportunity to use it!

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lilGirl,

You sound very disciplined in the advice given. I already have an extensive dumbbell routine and was wondering if there is somethig more I can add. Can you give me some examples of rotator cuff exercises and what results I should be looking for in doing them.

Thanks

NP

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Rotator cuff:

I like to use resistance tubing as they're easy to set to the right height and truly you don't need a ton of wt for a rotator.

Internal Rotation:

The only graphic/description I could find on the web is this one (ps. I don't like his elbow being out that much but it also shouldn't be pinched to side):

Internal rotation

External Rotation: would be the opposite and all you simply do is keep holding the tube but spin your body around so you're pulling the tube away from your body, instead of towards it.

The big thing is to keep your elbow at a 90angle and don't twist your body, only your shoulder.

Here's the standard rotator cuff exercises with dumbbells rotator with wts , I find them too darn akward compared to the tubing. Also, the tubing has variable resistance (step further away from the anchor point or closer, depending on whether you need more or less resistance) which means that you can always go to 'challenge/failure" so long as you have a tube with the right range of resistance. hope that made sense

Medial/Lateral (same thing) delt:

Recent studies (nobody please ask me to quote where this came from because I'll be darned if I'll be able to tell you precisely- most likely sports medicine) have shown that the lateral delt is integral to the stability of the shoulder so it should be done as well.

here's a somewhat decent looking explanation Lateral Delt raise

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Carol,

I've never considered working on this area before. I can see the benefit now that you point it out. Will be adding some new exercises for the group of teenagers that I have over on tuesdays, thursdays and saturdays for freeweights and miscellaneous exercises to numerous to list.

Thanks

NP

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Will be adding some new exercises for the group of teenagers that I have over on tuesdays, thursdays and saturdays for freeweights and miscellaneous exercises to numerous to list.

If you're working with teens make sure that you emphasis that these (rotators) are ENDURANCE muscles so that they don't go loading the weight on to them or repping too fast.

I'd suggest aiming for challenge/failure at ~15-18 to be on the safe side

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You know your stuff. These guys are always looking for a MAX improvement. I have to keep them focused on their base development. They don't like legs very much. I have them doing chat squats, deadlifts, leg extensions and leg curls. Do you have another suggestion that would round out this group of leg exercises?

thanks

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Truthfully, the suggestions I give are all pretty much basics. Nothing too fancy. For every way to do something in weigth training there's a million other ways. The big thing is that human nature puts some roadblocks up sometimes.

For legs/dirtbiking I'm keen on the hip adduction/ abduction stuff as it'll give you the side to side stability. Football/hockey guys do these exercises to prepare against the side slams as well.

I use a total hip machine:

Total hip

But you can use cables too: Cables (p.s.- i don't like how this guy is bent over but it's a wee bit tough with cables/resistance tubing to clear the other leg without doing so. Also, a thigh strap is safer than an ankle strap)

BTW- each person has a different range of motion for their hip and some people are so tight in the hips that they need to stretch/gain mobility before the abduction (away from the body) movement can be done properly/efficiently, make sure they listen to their body and not over do it or their lower back may suffer.

Adduction is simply bringing the hip inline towards the other leg/hip. Alot easier to lift alot of weight (for one reason- you're not usually dealing with the hip mobility problem as much) and basically would be beneficial for squeezing the seat/tank while riding.

A friend of mine's trainier makes her do alot of her exercises while squeezing a ball between her thighs (plz- no funny comebacks on that one fellas!). Try do squats like that. :cry:

Anyway, good luck!

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Well there is another exercise I have never tried. I could see laying on the floor and adding ankle weights to achieve a similar benefit.

We do three way stretching, one person is being stretched, one is holding the immobilized leg and the third person is stretching the other leg. There are several variations to increase range of motion but we don't do resistance training.

You have an interesting training regiment. I look forward to reading more of your fitness posts.

Thanks again

NP

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I would make cardiovascular training you first priority. Proper cardiovascular training will force your body to enhance its capillary and venous system thus allowing more blood to travel to muscles. And you will need to train your body to survive at high heart rates for extended periods.

I find biking, road or mtb, the most "enjoyable" way to do this. Since you're in a college town maybe in Wisconsin it would be easy to find a group of bike racers(the lycra people) to ride with. Try to keep up with them and it'll keep your heart rate up there.

Go to the football stadium and run stairs. If you have a training partner have him hold your legs and do the stairs with your arms. If your both bad azz's carry each other up the stairs.

Hit the pool. Swimming is good for building your vascular system in the arms. Arm pump is from not having adequate blood flow in your arms not from lack of strength.

Have fun. 365/24/7 is what wins races.

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