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Too clutch or not too clutch....

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When I got my bike about a year ago I went out for a log ride and found it easier to ride faster when not using my clutch. My buddy told me that not using the clutch is a 'BAD THING'. So lately I have been trying to use the clutch - this is resulting in me being a slower rider, especially in the turns.

Do you guys always use your clutch, and is there some tricks I can try so I get use to using the clutch?

Thanks,

Ed

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I only use the clutch to upshift or downshift when goofing off, otherwise just to start and stop, There are differing opinions on this subject, as long as you are momentarily letting off the gas to shift you should be fine.

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GSB,

I'm one those drz describes, I don't even use the clutch to shift, except from a dead stop. Right now what I'm perfecting is not using the clutch in turns. Doing my braking/clutch before the corner, then powering through. Basically, using the clutch as little as possible.

For me, 4 strokes handle much better this way, especially in mud or sand.

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i put over 27,000 miles on my last streetbike, im pretty sure i was harder on that bike than most people are their beater bikes :cry: but i hardly ever used my clutch, basically only to start and stop. that clutch was working just fine :cry: im not too sure how much different dirt bikes are though, i hope not too different b/c i guess ill have to get a new clutch on mine here soon :cry: heck sometimes i didn't even use the clutch in my old yota. it kept running, that was an awesome truck, wish i never sold her :cry:

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Damage to the clutch parts is not an issue, any concern would be with the tranny if you didnt relieve the load before shifting

Just curious, did you friend tell you this before or after he found out you were fast without the clutch :cry:

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Damage to the clutch parts is not an issue, any concern would be with the tranny if you didnt relieve the load before shifting

Yup

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I use it when I have the time (just cruising, no obstacles) but I'd be screwed if I used it during hill climbs or in mud bog. Just change your oil A LOT and make sure you are getting those metal shavings out.

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Damage to the clutch parts is not an issue, any concern would be with the tranny if you didnt relieve the load before shifting

Most tran wont up shift unless you relieve the load by backing off the gas just a bit.

I thought only Harley riders used the clutch!

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Just curious, did you friend tell you this before or after he found out you were fast without the clutch :cry:

Yep - and he still cant keep up :cry:

Ed

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I road raced for years and only used the clutch off the line and for downshifting to keep the rear tire from hopping. I've had dirtbikes since I was a kid and rarely used the clutch. I bought a 99 WR 400 new and have driven it year round without the clutch without a problem, until 2 months ago. I had a paddle tire on and noticed that the clutch was starting to slip a bit. I bought new plates and springs and popped them in and it worked fine. A few days later I fell and snapped my clutch perch. I had to ride a couple of miles to get home and most of the trip was normal except I stalled going through a tight ditch. I restarted and gave the bike a little push to get rolling and popped it into 1st. I heard a funny noise like the kickstart was held down a bit and the ratchet was whining, then it stopped. I made it home and popped on a new perch, but now the lever had a funny feel to it. I took off the cover and found 7 of the 12 basket fingers had snapped off. I've shattered fiber plates before but this is the first time I've ever had a basket break.

With the new plates and springs and paddle tire there wasn't much give so the weakest link broke.

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I know I am "OLD SCHOOL" but I believe in using the clutch to shift. I also use the clutch as a power adjuster. I don't slip it near like some do 2 strokes but I do use is quite a bit.

I always use it to shift , especially downshifts.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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I only clutch to get the bike going...been doing that for while now on my '00 WR400F and it seems to like it. I'm told that these newer bikes are designed to be shifted that way, several good sources have confirmed that for me.

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I only clutch to get the bike going...been doing that for while now on my '00 WR400F and it seems to like it. I'm told that these newer bikes are designed to be shifted that way, several good sources have confirmed that for me.

With care you can shift them that way but they are not designed to be mistreated in such a way all the time.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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I also use the clutch as a power adjuster.

I keep a finger on it all day long. The best tool to have to save time, conserve energy and keep momentum.

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I know I am "OLD SCHOOL" but I believe in using the clutch to shift. I also use the clutch as a power adjuster. I don't slip it near like some do 2 strokes but I do use is quite a bit.

I always use it to shift , especially downshifts.

Cher'o,

Dwight

What is an example of you using the clutch as a power adjuster? For example, when going up a technical uphill and you want to maintain engine RPM, but don't want the speed associated with the RPM, you use the clutch to adjust power to the drive gear? And to smooth power delivery for transistions between shifts?

Thanks.

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At the Sears Point Superbike races, Keith Code had a new training tool. It was a ZX6 with a computer checking throttle and shift lever position, complete with a screen to tell you when to shift. The excercise was to train you how to properly shift without the clutch, correctly timing a blip or lift of the throttle with shifting.

My dad asked Keith about additional wear on the gearbox, and Keith explained that if the throttle is properly used, the gearbox does not know whether the clutch is being used or not. Additionally, not using the clutch results in quicker, smoother shifts that are less likely to upset a motorcycle on the edge of traction.

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What is an example of you using the clutch as a power adjuster? For example, when going up a technical uphill and you want to maintain engine RPM, but don't want the speed associated with the RPM, you use the clutch to adjust power to the drive gear? And to smooth power delivery for transistions between shifts?

Thanks.

Like on hills when you don't want the front end to come up or you hit a rock than kills your speed.

Like to smooth the drive off a corner without the downshift.

( Clutch in and smoothly out ) don't try to slip.

I think you have the drift of things.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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