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HELP!!! Sheared-off bolt

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I need some help, here...

I did the ultimate stupid thing and over-torqued the upper oil filter cover bolt on my 250R. Sheared the threaded tip right off. Can anyone tell me what it will involve to fix this? And potential cost for the fix? AARRGGGHHHHH!! :cry:

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You’re not the first to do this. In fact I’m sure mine won't last removing it again before it sheers off. There have been other posts on this and you can find them by searching for them. I’ve read posts though that when they have removed the cover they were able to get to what’s left of the bolt. Some had to use and "easy out" to remove the bolt. You can either buy and easy out or make one. You probably can find easy outs at auto parts / tool supplies / sears and such. Some make them out of drill stock or old screw drivers / old drill bits, any thing that will dig into what’s left of the bolt to back it out with out damaging the threads. I believe I even read a post that they just used a small screw driver to remove what’s left of the bolt.

Let us know how it goes.

dw

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Thanks for the help! After reading your reply and searching numerous threads for advice, I decided to grow some and try to fix it myself instead of paying who knows how much for the dealer to fix it. I took off the left-side case cover and got the end of the bolt out with a pair of needlenose pliers! It just snapped off - looks like the threads are all okay. Now all I need is a new gasket and upper bolt and I'm back in business... hope the dealer has those in stock. :cry:

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Snapping this bolt is a very easy thing to do. On my own bike, it snapped 2 ft./lbs. before the specified torque setting.

Have you had the oil filter cover off to see what's left of the bolt? Often, the bolt snaps at the top of the threaded portion leaving a small piece protruding from the inner casing which can be turned out with pliers. The piece that's left will not be tight in the hole so anyway you turn it will generally do it.

I replced mine with a higher quality bolt. I think the stock bolts are made from pretty soft metal.

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Good to hear you got the bolt out. :cry: You can look on the bright side of things at least the bolts snap and not the other way round, stripping the thread in the casing, now that is a nightmare. I wonder if the bolts are designed for that to happen or is that asking too much. :cry:

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look on the bright side of things at least the bolts snap and not the other way round, stripping the thread in the casing, now that is a nightmare.

:cry: :cry: ahh flashbacks from my old bike...not only did it strip but busted a chunk out of the case :cry: :cry:

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IMPORTANT!

This is a very common mistake. The values of torque given in the manuals are for DRY THREADS. If there is oil on the treads, then I always lower the torque value by about 20 percent. This is extreemly important for all fasteners on all equipment. You can do a search on the internet for all sorts of information on this subject if you want verification. Three factors are used by manufacturers to caculate the torque value that they put into tech manuals. They are bolt stretch, thread friction and underside bolt head friction. The values given in all tech manuals are for dry threads for consistency. The mechanic has to use these values as guides in determining what the acutal value should be in his circumstance.

Lowering the dry tread torque value for the loss of friction on the treads and under the bolt head from the oil will save you from ever stripping a bolt again.

BTW, I recommend oiling the treads of ALL fasteners that deal with aluminum parts and steel bolts (and vice versa for parts like the axle nut) in order to keep them from siezing together over time and causing other tread related problems. Just remember to lower the torque by about 20 percent. (this is a rough value I always use, however it does vary slightly depending on the size of the fastener and if you wanted to be super accurate there are tables avaialbe to look up the lowering factor, however I have NEVER had any problems wit a bolt or fastener by using the average of 20 percent)

It goes to say that it would have saved lots of folks from the agony of stripping threads and cracking aluminum parts if Honda (and others) would print in the manual this information since most bolts (especially oil and filter drain bolts) will most definetly have oil on them and most folks are not professional mechanics that automaically perform the calculation.

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Just remember to lower the torque by about 20 percent. (this is a rough value I always use, however it does vary slightly depending on the size of the fastener and if you wanted to be super accurate there are tables avaialbe to look up the lowering factor, however I have NEVER had any problems wit a bolt or fastener by using the average of 20 percent)

Do you have a link to one of these super accurate tables by chance? I have been searching with no luck for quite some time for a detailed/accurate chart for this. I saw one a long time ago but lost the link unfortunately.

I think 20% is probably a good estimate but I remember some lubes requiring as much as a 50% reduction in torque.

Thanks

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does this include the (2) drain bolts ? should these be tightened by hand also?

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Tighten them by hand as if you were attatching your radiator shroud to the gas tank with a T handle. I stripped a linkage bolt and a rear axle on my '02 450 and learned my lesson. I only use a torque wrench for engine internals now. The rest is by feel. That oil filter bolt just needs to be tight enough to not fall out. Firmly tighten, but do not overtorque it.

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I completely agree about just hand-tightening all external bolts. After I repaired mine I went out and got a good set of metric T-handles... that's all I use now for covers, oil bolts, shrouds, etc.

Firmly tighten, don't overtorque as the Antman says and you should be fine. I haven't had a problem since... :cry:

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I once used the Honda spec to tighten up the fork tube pinch bolts on the triple clamps and I did not get to the full torque value before the gap on the triple clamps began to distort and almost touch each other! (You know, the gap where the pinch bolts are) :cry:

I go by feel now for everything external, as well! :cry:

The only exception is the rear axle but it is a reduced amount of torque. I did not like the feel of the axle when I tried to torque it to the 94 foot lbs. that Honda recommends. I go to 80 foot lbs now.

:cry:

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The only exception is the rear axle but it is a reduced amount of torque. I did not like the feel of the axle when I tried to torque it to the 94 foot lbs. that Honda recommends. I go to 80 foot lbs now.

80ft/lbs is all I've ever torqued my 450 and 250 too. 94 ft/lbs is ridiculous.

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I'm glad to see that you guys stated that. I thought 94 lbf-ft was absurd.

What about the front? It recommends 65 lbf-ft

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To torque or not to torque.........everyone has their own opinion......so here is mine:

I have found out from years of wrenching and talking to other mechanics that not all things on your race bike should be torqued with a torque wrench. I have broken a few bolts/nuts trying to torque them and never reaching that torque. Everything that has a bolt or nut has a torque value and it is probably listed in whatever manual you use as reference to repair your motorcycle. These values can be used as a guide to torque or to determine what grade of bolt/nut was used in an application.

My rule of thumb is that I usually torque everything that has to do with the engine and frame.....like case halves, cylinder, head, swingarm, etc. However, things like axles,brakes, forks and the like should be done with common sense and tighten accordingly. Well, how tight is that? Basically I would tell someone to snug it and then another 1/4 turn.

Note.....make sure you are aware of a wet (oil or grease) torque or dry torque. For example, if a nut on a shaft calls for a dry torque of 25NM and you torque it wet.....it is now at about 35NM and could break the shaft.

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Actually the torque is the same whether or not the bolt has oil or not. But a bolt with dry threads torqued to 25nm would have gotten to that torque without as much turning of the wrench as a bolt with oil on the treads. So the bolt stretch is a lot more after torqueing with oil on the treads which is why one needs to always (unless the manual says otherwise) to lower the dry thread torque values by about 15-20% when there is oil on the threads.

I have been working with wrenches my whole life and I always use a torque wrench on virutally everything related to the engine. I believe that this is the proper way to know what bolt stretech you have so that the clamping pressure is correct as well as having the bolts not coming loose. I almost always oil the treads of the fasteners (unless I am using lock-tite on them for vibration resistance) and I lower the torque by 15-20 percent. And I never have broken a bolt or stripped threads on my 450 or 250 or any other bike using this commonly practised method.

However, I certainly respect everyone's right to not use a torque wrench and I know many mechanics that have pretty good calibrated hands with regard to torque values. But to the weekend mechanic, my opinion is that I think it is always best to use an accurate torque wrench and adjust the owners/shop manual's values for the lubricant on the treads.

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i did this same exact thing on my crf. all i did was drain the oil out of that side, popped off the side cover (your gonna need to buy a gasket because trust me it will break), the bold wasnt stuck or anything it just snapped off at the gaket beetween the sidecover and the case. pretty easy fix but still a stupid mistake :cry:

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