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Stand up going uphills?

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Hello.....I have been doing alot of well almost single track uphills. Some have rocky sections and turns and sections where you gotta pick your feet up because the sides are so narrow my foot pegs fold up because the sides are too high. I always sit down because i feel like i have more control incase i fall. Would i make it up easier by standing up?

Thanks. :cry:

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I agree. Only sit if you need to paddle to maintain forward motion. On Hills , momentum is everything.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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Hello.....I have been doing alot of well almost single track uphills. Some have rocky sections and turns and sections where you gotta pick your feet up because the sides are so narrow my foot pegs fold up because the sides are too high. I always sit down because i feel like i have more control incase i fall. Would i make it up easier by standing up?

Thanks. :cry:

I don't understand. If you are lifting your feet to avoid smashing them into rocks when the pegs fold, then that seems like a good thing. If you stand won't your feet be in the line of fire when you fold the pegs? Unless you can lift your feet/foot out of the way went standing ?

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From an XR100 rider ... I get stuck in deep ruts on hills alot too. The guys I ride with can clear most ruts easily, but the XR is so low that sometimes I wedge the pegs into the sides of the rut and can't get it out!! It's crazy.

I think you need to use your judgement .. If your momentum is good and you can tear through the rut go for it. For really deep ruts that are packed mud or rocks, I sit on it and throttle the [@#$%&*!] out of it. It's a 100. Ya can't really get hurt.

I've found most of the time that just keeping on the throttle gets me through. If it's really twisty, technical and rutted out, I'll sit and lift my feet and paddle a bit. It's harder, but I find I can shift the bike around better that way to avoid trouble spots.

For steep, open climbs you're better off standing and peeking over your front fender.

My two cents :cry:

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I feel that I have more control when climbing hills if I'm sitting. That way I am able to move my weight around better.

Just do whatever is more comfortable. :cry:

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I think it's moreso what you are comfortable with.

I stand when:

1. going slow in rough terrain, to get a better view so I can pick a clear path.

2. hitting large washboards or other bumpy sections at med-high speed.

3. After catching some air, i'll stand a little bit to help soak up some of the bump from the landing.

IMHO, standing raises your center of gravity, making balancing and manuvering a tad bit harder. If you see yourself coming up on high obstacles that could catch a footpeg... slooowwww down and go easy!

I always practice standing on tricky sections, high rocks, deep ruts.

:cry:

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Its all about the momentum, if I got a massive run with like 3-4th gear pinned then of course stand up but if your stuck in a creek bed that goes up forever then I sit.

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I agree. Only sit if you need to paddle to maintain forward motion. On Hills , momentum is everything.

Cher'o,

Dwight

EXACTLY!! :cry:

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You are correct. Standing lowers the CG as the weight is on the pegs. Most people think sitting lowers the CG but the last time check they were sitting on the seat an not on the pegs. This is one reason why they tell you to wight the outside peg while cornering when your seated (helps lower the CG)

If you stand straight up on a steep hill, too much weight is transferred to the front of the bike which cuts down the on the traction from the rear tire. Stand in a position where your butt hovers over the seat a few inches. this will give you the traction to the rear wheel, some room to allow the bike to move more freely for obstacles and can give you a little extra suspension (yor legs).

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