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Whoops....

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A lot of the trails (single track) we ride in Tallahassee are heavily whooped out. I find getting through them with any speed exhausting. The fastest way through them I find it to get my weight as far back while standing up and hold on for my life. Can anyone offer some tips on how to negotiate whoops speedily and safely? I'd avoid them if I could, but they're everywhere down here... EVERYWHERE :cry:

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almost same thing with the thomaston dam trails. almost all of the right side trails have whoops. ive seen guys do them right but ive never mastered them either. only thing ive heard is, the faster you go, the better. i talked to a local racer and he says he tries flying into them and skimming the tops of them. then he says he checks quick for rocks or debris, and then doesnt worry about the whoops and looks ahead at the next turn. i guess try them fairly fast 1nce and see how you do

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im not sure myself. I wheelie them sometimes so my front end gets over and some i just lean back throttle and keep the front end light. Seems to work for me but im think im doing it all wrong. :cry: Thats the easiest way for me getting over them without punding myself to death.

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I think the best way to deal with those is to throttle over them. Keep the weight in the back, front wheel light, and hit the tops with the front wheel with as much speed as you can deal with while steering with the front wheel on the whoops it comes in contact with. For me, the faster you hit em, the easier they are to deal with. You just got to hang on and keep massive momentum and let your suspension do the work for you.

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Grip with your feet, have loose arms so the bike can rock. Get weight just slightly back, but not too far back or the bike cant rock and you will do all the work. If they are long and continuous dont wheelie, cause the front will eventually come down and the effects of the whoops on the front end and you will be exagerated from the landing force on the wheel. I agree with above look far ahead and attack them fast so you get some air time rather than rolling up and down every one. Dont just go insane. Try it normal speed then again faster then faster then faster etc. Have a play in differnt positions with differnt grips. Thats how I learnt and now its definitely one of my strengths and passing opportuities.

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You just need to keep practicing. Keeping your weight way back works for just about anything but is very tiring. As you get more experienced you will start weighting more towards the center and the whoops will feel easier.

Careful though because if you mess up you will being going over the handlbars real quick.

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Careful though because if you mess up you will being going over the handlbars real quick.

Yep. Been there, done that. I wouldn't suggest trying to go into a long section of whoops fast to see if it works out. There's a pretty good chance you'll crash like me -- right around whoop #12, over the bars :cry: :cry:

To work on going faster in the whoops, try to find short sections of whoops that you can attack different ways. Say like 5-8 whoops in a row, but no more. That way if you lose it and get way out of shape, you'll probably be able to recover at the end. Then on this short section you can try wheelieing, hammering, rhythming, etc. Also check out the Gary Semics video on "Jumping and Whoops". It has some good tips in it. :cry:

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well i hate whoops too.. but its something you have to deal with so.. i always lean back i want my front tire as light as possible, and when i hit the face of a whoop i gas it then i let off the throttle then gas it again to keep my front tire as light as i can to avoid it smashing the next whoop you will get the hang of when to gas and not to gas i guess if you are going fast enough you could keep a steady throttle but the only ideal way for that is if you could just ride over the top of them ... now this works great if they are not monster whoops...but just trail whoops or wash whoops and the faster you go you might get into a rhythm and just double them or triple them and not worry about it but for me there is just too much room for error to try that with a trail whoop that dont really have a rhythm.. well good luck

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Whoops are fun!

:cry:

Remember that the whoop will be biggest in the middle of the trail, where everybody else is. Get out to the sides of the whoop, and it flattens out.

When I get on a fast whoop section, I am working the sides of the trail (I stay on one side of the trail as long as I can, and when my momentum takes be back towards the trail, I then go across the trail and work the other side, continually going back and forth), and missing the big part of the whoop. Keep on the throttle and the weight pretty much over the pegs.

Get good at it, and you can actually "rest" in the whoops, when everybody else is getting beat to a pulp!

:cry:

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Yes I agree with Brandon here. Three important pointers to remember about whoops:

1) First and foremost try and miss them, flat ground is always better than rough.

2) If you can't find a smooth line and your in a slow technicle section (2nd gear stuff) then let the bike rock underneath you with a relaxed standup position.

3) If they trail section is fast and whooped out get some speed up and hop across the tops. Even if your not clearing them your still missing the deepest part. If you swapping then up increase your rebound a few clicks.

And yes you can actually learn to like them after a while.

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Oh man...this is what I've been working on the past several rides. We have TONS of whooped out trails here and they always slow me down. This is what I've been taught, which is pretty much the same as several posts here...

Stand up. (I know it's probably common sense to most of you, but I really had to be told this... :cry: )

Keep the weight back to keep the front end light.

Slower is NOT better, but gradually increase your speed so you don't just go full throttle and get into something you can't handle (our whoops are definitely not all evenly spaced and sized!!)

Give the throttle a little "blip" at the top of each one to pull the nose up.

Practice, practice, practice.

This past Sunday was my most successful whoop day. By no means does it match anyone I ride with, but it felt good. I was on a friend's WR450 and it handled them so much differently than my KLX300. I actually got to FEEL what lofting was. Once you feel it, the next time is a little bit easier. Gonna have to go try it on the KLX this weekend.

Good luck!

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If you are swapping, REDUCE your rebound setting (turn out for less rebound). Swapping is caused by packing and packing occurs when the suspension can't extend far enough to receive and absorb the next bump. Consequently, the susupension has to absorb the bump farther into the stroke, and "packs" up until you have little or no suspension and you start to swap. If you swap, go out 1 click on rebound. If you still swap, go out one more click. This will affect other areas of riding however, so a compromise setting must be obtained.

I always go pretty mellow through whoops, trying to touch my front tire to the top of each whoop. Whoops are fun for a while--but what is scary are the trees on each side of the trail. Whoops on a 24 foot wide MX track are one thing--a whole new ball game in the woods on a 40 inch trail!

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your suspension system is most important thing when it comes to whoops. Have you ever had your suspension set up for you ie height, weight, type of riding. A correct setup will make a huge difference in the way your bike will handle.

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Rebound... that is the "clicker"? I know that sounds like a dumb question, but the manual isn't very clear, plus I've never had a bike with adjustable suspension before. IN is clockwise? (increase reboud), OUT is counter clockwise? (decrease rebound)

Thanks.

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You got it. Most all suspension terms are considered from full tight.

"x" number of clicks out.

That keeps you consistent.

Except I think that full in is ALOT of rebound restriction, as it is restricting the flow of hydraulic fluid. As you turn the clicker out, you are widening the hydraulic pathway, which will quicken up the action.

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If you swap, go out 1 click on rebound. If you still swap, go out one more click. This will affect other areas of riding however, so a compromise setting must be obtained.

By adjusting the rebound out, will it make the suspension softer on landings, since the fluid will flow more freely?

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Compression dampening is controlled at the bottom of the shock, and rebound is controlled at the top.

Increasing the damping on the bottom will prevent you from bottoming out, and once you find that spot, then you work on the rebound so that it does not "swap".

Good luck!

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Thanks for all the help Brandon. It looks like I've hijacked my own post and turned it into a suspension post. I a little confused as to the top and bottom deal. Are you talknig about the front forks or the rear shock? And if you mean the forks, do you mean bottom as in down underneath the axle? Sorry for all the seemingly simple questions.

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