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anyone ever spoke and true a wheel?

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well, after my wreck i decided to just go with a new excel front wheel and spokes, and im wondering if lacing and truing is something i could possible do on my own, i've never done it before and i sure as hell dont wanna end up with a crooked or out of round wheel, and the bike shops here in my area are saying 90 bucks to lace and true! heck with that.. any advice??? thank you.

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Hey give it a try, you won't learn anything unless you try. Besides, you probably cannot ruin it. You may try for hours on end to get it right, but if it fails, then you are not out anything but time. You can still take it to the dealer.

I have only trued a wheel, not the full blown replacement. I put the bike on a stand so I could spin the rear wheel. Then I clamped a metal bar on the swingarm, and pushed the bar right up against the rim. Then I spun the wheel and watched if the gap between the bar and the rim changed. It did a little bit. To my surprise, a little tweeking of a few spoke took out the wobble. The wobble was very slight, I could not tell when riding. I only trued the thing because I found some loose and figured it could be out.

You have to tighten the right spokes to make it go the way you want. The spokes are supposed to be in tension so you assume they only pull. They are diagonal and wider at the hub then the rim, so you the left spokes pull left and the right spokes pull right. The thing is, when you tighten one up a bit, others seem to loosen. So going small amounts of tightening is best.

But you are starting from scratch, so you also have to make the hub in the center of the rim, not just side to side alignment. So make another bar to clamp to the swingarm and nest it inside the rim. Clamp it tight, you cant have your guide be flexible or moving around on you.

I would work my way around by tightening a few on 4 sides first to get it about centered. Then alternate back and forth and slowly tighten them in stages. I might wrench on each spoke 4 times or so before its all done, but for a first time I would expect to go slow. And spin the wheel often to see what happens when you tighten a spoke, that way you will get the feel for it and make it happen.

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My experience is bicycle wheels, but when I owned my bike shop I built literally hundreds of bicycle wheels. I became very good at it, but when my brother had me rebuild a back wheel off his moto, I'd have to say to do it properly was a real task. Lacing the spokes is hard cause they are so strong and don't want to bend, but starting with a new, true rim would be a huge bonus. Personally , spend the cash and have the dealer do it, it's hard to know the right tension to build at, you really need experience. Too little tension and the spokes will forever work loose, too much and they'll be snapping in the not too distant future, or cracking the rim at the nipple hole!!

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take a picture of your wheel (for lacing reference)take the old wheel apart, then get all your small spokes on one side and large spokes (longer) on the other, then put the spokes in, look at the polaroid picture you took of the lace pattern and make it look like the picture! then if you dont want to true it, take it to the shop!

remeber they charge 90$ to do all of it, but you did like 75% of the work (all those little nipples) so they shouldnt charge more than like 30- 40$ for it to be trued! :cry:

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For a first timer a picture will be a real help.

It is important to put anti-sieze on the threaded ends of the spokes.

It helps to have a dial indicator to check the runout.

When you are done the spokes should have pretty much equal tension and

the nipples should be very tight.

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