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Deep mud

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Whats the best way to tackle an area with deep and soft mud all over that paddling with your legs dont really help?

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Just like deep ruts, the best way to handle mud is to avoid it.

If can't avoid it treat it like ice. You can go super fast on ice in straight line, you just can't change direction or speed and when you put your foot down to catch yourself it may not help.

The ground isn't flat like ice so you need to look ahead for the smoothest line.

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Pick your line as straight as possible. Keep your momentum up. Go one or two gears higher and lug it for traction. No wheel spin allowed. Good tires ( s12's) at 8 psi will do the trick. :cry: All else fails bring buddies with ATV's and a winch! :cry:

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How deep are we talking here? The biggest trick I've come across for mud riding is to learn how to control the motion of the back of the bike using your legs and butt, and then control the direction of the bike with the throttle and the side-to-side motion of the back of the bike. You also control the side-to-side motion of the front of the bike by pulling the bars left and right, not by steering the front wheel.

You need to keep up enough speed to keep your front tire relatively clean (stay out of 1st gear for sure), and you need to steer the bike with moving the back end and throttle. Like, when you get in a muddy slippery rut, you wiggle the back end using your legs and butt, and use the throttle to either keep you centered in the rut, or to jump out of it if you want.

If you're talking axle-deep mud, I don't have a clue. The buddy on a quad suggestion is probably the way to go. :cry:

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Talking about tire pressure, most of the time i ride with probably 20-30 psi because i have to travel 30+ km of road on the bike and am lazy to release the air. Does it make a hell lot of difference? :cry:

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The difference tire pressure makes is so much that you should just carry a few CO2 cartiridges and a gauge. That way you can let the pressure out for the trails and then re-inflate for the road. You have to run low tire pressures in mud if you want traction the flexing of the tire clears out the mud between the knobs! :cry:

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Just like everyone is saying, keep your momentum up. I do my best when I ride extremely aggresive in mud, leaving less room for indecisiveness (mud is waiting to catch you off-guard, trust me!) Mud is the last place to be on a Sunday ride, even though it probably is Sunday when you ride:).

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I ride ALOT!!, of mud and snow, my method is to look ahead and if you get into a tough place keep looking where you wan't to go!!. Don't pay attention to where you may land if you F$%CK up. :cry:

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i put my xr in 1st gear& power my way thru & hope for the best???

sometimes i make it & sometimes i dont & eat mud,

:cry:

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I agree with keeping your eyes focused on where you are going. Look down a bit to see what your about to hit, but try keep focused ahead. I ride a lot of mud. I guess I am a mud-aholic. My friends will try avoid it a bit, but I can't get enough. Depending on the distance you have to cover and the thickness and depth. I try on average to be in 2nd sometimes 3rd gear. I rock my weight back on the bike so the front tire can react to the terrain a bit more. It seems to flow with the ruts a lot better that way. NEVER SLOW DOWN once you are in it. My friend is a tippy toer and he gets stuck too easy because he doesn't committ and maintain speed. Basically, focus on where you need to be, keep the front tire up and skimming as much as possible, and committ to speed.

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Talking about tire pressure, most of the time i ride with probably 20-30 psi because i have to travel 30+ km of road on the bike and am lazy to release the air. Does it make a hell lot of difference? :cry:

Yes, It makes tons of diffence. ON a dirt bike I would run no more than 12 psi. ON a dualsport , no more than 15 psi.

Deep mud and slime, I run 10-11 psi front and 8-10 psi rear.

Heavy Duty tubes.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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Thanks for the input! Will definately try the difference riding with lower tire pressure. :cry:

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