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Overrevving?

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Reading about all of the valve issues and such, I see a lot of people mentioning that overrevving could be the problem. But my question is, how do you overrev a bike that has a rev limiter on it? Is there some sort of situation that can bypass the limiter? I'd like to know so I can be sure that I'm not accidentally overrevving my X.

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I seriously doubt over-revving is the problem. One of the bikes in my garage gets revved out and one does not. One had valves start moving before 20 hours, one did not. The gently ridden one has the valves that need replacement.

From what I have seen, there is no common pattern/usage trait on the user's end that correlates with having valve problems. Not that one doesn't exist, it just hasn't manifested itself yet.

**Standard disclaimer that the red bike is fantastic in every way except the valve issue ... well, that and carb access. :cry: **

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In my opinion (that and $.50 will get you a cup of coffee) the valve train in these bikes can't stand the rpm that alot of people are cranking these things up to. Alot of things contribute to that; geometry, weight, spring seat pressure/dynamics. I think people who come off the 2 stroke bikes think they need to keep a 4 stroke "up on the pipe". The 4 stroke bike needs to be ridden down where it is making max torque, which again my opinion 8k to 12k rpm that is where the bike will be fastest. They rev limiter on the stock ignition is at 13,100 rpm. It took alot of work but I got my son to ride his down in the meat of the torque and he is much faster but he didn't feel like it because the motor wasn't screaming! You never hear him hit the rev limiter. Horsepower is good but torque is what gives you the sudden acceleration and feel of pulling your arms out of socket. The best is the rpm where max torque and max horsepower and nearest each other. You can't do anything I know of with the stock ignition. We run a Vortex ignition which you can have the rev limiter programmed where you want it. Again just one man's opinion :cry:

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In my opinion (that and $.50 will get you a cup of coffee) the valve train in these bikes can't stand the rpm that alot of people are cranking these things up to. Alot of things contribute to that; geometry, weight, spring seat pressure/dynamics. I think people who come off the 2 stroke bikes think they need to keep a 4 stroke "up on the pipe". The 4 stroke bike needs to be ridden down where it is making max torque, which again my opinion 8k to 12k rpm that is where the bike will be fastest. They rev limiter on the stock ignition is at 13,100 rpm. It took alot of work but I got my son to ride his down in the meat of the torque and he is much faster but he didn't feel like it because the motor wasn't screaming! You never hear him hit the rev limiter. Horsepower is good but torque is what gives you the sudden acceleration and feel of pulling your arms out of socket. The best is the rpm where torque and horsepower and nearest each other. You can't do anything I know of with the stock ignition. We run a Vortex ignition which you can have the rev limiter programmed where you want it. Again just one man's opinion :cry:

I couldn't agree more. Hitting the rev limiter on this bike in every gear only makes me slower. I've done it and it just doesn't make the bike faster. The 8k - 12k is a pretty good baseline and right about where I tend to keep it.

I ride with a buddy on a CR125 and as we all know, the 125's are notorious for needing to be on the pipe to get any power. He swears that his bike "is the same bike" I have. He paid $900.00 for his used '96 CR125. I obviously paid quite a bit more. His bike is ugly, mine is pretty. I can outride him all day long on my bike; not necessarily because it's so much faster (even though it is), but primarily because I don't tire out nearly as quick as he does. Of course we're both in our mid-to-late 30's so we're both tired before the young guys but my point is, it's NOT a CR125 and cannot be ridden like one.

I love 2strokes, always have. Anyone over 30 that's been riding for any time has owned a 2stroke. They're great motors that are easy to work on; they just don't ride quite like a 4stroke. I can remember seeing the beginning of the 4stroke craze and thinking "I'll never ride one of those!". Now I can't see myself on anything but a 4stroke.

Torque is where it's at IMO. Damn I talk alot!

Oh yeah, I have a buddy who got a KTM 300EXC. That's definitely a 2stroke I would own. Those bikes are great anywhere and they don't have the typical 2stroke power band that I'm used to. Tons of power everywhere! It aint replacing my 250f though, at least not yet.

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