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I'm a Jello Blob today

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Hats off to you ladies who ride with gusto and/or with heavy bikes!!

My first real ride was this morning and my legs and arms are total jello right now. All I can say is, Thank God, I have a light bike with all that pushing around I did.

I didn't do too badly for my first ride. We must have ridden about 20 miles (this is a total guess since I have half a tank and I'm supposed to get 40 miles) for close to 2 hours. I dumped the clutch 3 or 4 times and bogged once. I had a time hard time keeping the bike idling so anytime someone stopped in front of me, I stalled. ANd then it would take a good 5 or 6 kicks to get going again.

Hills were my nemesis! I would start to go up and then I was afraid I would hit the powerband so I'd let off the gas, and **bonk** stall out. The one time I did hit the powerband, I wheelied up the hill and almost hit a tree!:cry: . Man, talk about a heartattack!

The trails we rode we really narrow, handlebar width. I didn't have any problems maneuvering the bike but keeping the throttle open is something I need to practice. I'm much more confident if I can keep a constant pace and not put my feet down but when the person in front of me stops or slows down.... bad news for me. I have a harder time adjusting to the clutch release, giving it gas and focusing on not too much or I'll a tree rather than just rolling through.

Now, I understand what people are talking about when they blip the throttle. Did that once and forgot to let go! :cry: Good thing I was in the sand!

That powerband on the KX100 is something to be careful of. Man, I wish my minivan would accelerate like that!! Its going to take quite a bit for me to get used to that sudden jump on speed.

Well, all in all, I had a great time! I think I'd prefer more open trails for a bit while I get used to the bike and the guys I rode with were excellent in helping me out! (I just hope I wasn't a burden on them!)

I hope all of you had a great riding weekend! :cry: :cry:

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Thanks, kpicha

we had an interesting ride yesterday, Ivan had re-decorated our trails :cry:

soundslike you had a good time, too

...I was afraid I would hit the powerband so I'd let off the gas, and **bonk** stall out.

hmmm, when I went from a stump pulling XR600 to an all-or-nothing 1st year EC250 I felt much like you do now

that thing wheelied me over berms, me hanging on like a flag-waving-in-the-wind with NO control over the beast :cry:

try this: hold the throttle open all the time, cut the power by pulling the clutch and select speed by shifting gears; this way you do not run into the powerband plus do not stall the bike all the time, only thing you have to endure is the noise :cry:

one more thing

did you adjust your clutch lever to fit the size of your hands? females tend to have probs because of their often short fingers

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normal shifting:

(borrowed I do not know where)

Your goal in using the clutch is to let the lever out slow and not let the RPM drop too much. Very slowly add throttle as you let the clutch out.

When I first learned to ride with a clutch nobody told me to add throttle and I was getting a little bored from riding dirt bikes (or stalling dirt bikes). The first thing to do if you are riding your first bike and it has a clutch is to not be afraid of the bike. If you are afraid that you will flip over you will do something stupid and flip over. Once a new rider learns the bike will only go as fast as you let it they won't be as afraid.

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Just keep it up and you will get the hang of things in no time. :cry: What a feeling, wheeling up a hill. It make me grin ear to ear just thinking about it. You are probably so tired from hanging on to the bike, it really pulls. When I was just learning to ride I would use the death grip. When your body is stiff and tense it is working even when you don't need to. It's exhausting.

As far as the stalling goes, I would take a little time just stopping and starting. When you are starting to stop just pull in the clutch and give it a few little revs, that way it shouldn't stall. After a little practice you won't even think about it. I still do it when I ride my husbands 250F.

I would definetly suggest that flywheel weight. It will smooth out your powerband a little and ease the hit somewhat. Don't worry it will still be punchy and hit, it will just hook up better and be a little easier to control.

Keep up the practice. :cry:

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You are probably so tired from hanging on to the bike, it really pulls.

Ha, you're not kidding! My arms feel like they've been pulled out of their sockets! :cry: Thank God for Advil!

Yeah, after today, I'm sure I'm going to get a flywheel weight. Just need to get the money first.

Also, my plug is black and oily so I'll need to address that issue before next weekend. I haven't checked the main jet (not sure where to look) to see if I need to lean it out one notch or if just setting the idle higher will help.

Fiep- great idea on using the clutch more. I started doing that for a bit and it worked well but then I started to think that I might ruin the clutch so I stopped. And yep, I'm giving it gas when I'm letting the clutch out. I just need to be careful not to give it too much gas or the bike is going to take off without me! :cry:

Oh and the clutch reach seemed to feel fine but I'll double check. Thanks for suggesting that. I think the previous owner had smallish hands, too. I can use two fingers on the clutch and brake. I just have to remember to loosen my grip on the throttle while I'm braking (gee, how come I'm not slowing down :cry: ) :cry:

After trying to push it up some of those hills, I'm really impressed with those of you who ride heavier bikes! (our hills are short, really steep types otherwise, I would have just ridden up them). :cry:

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Also, my plug is black and oily so I'll need to address that issue before next weekend. I haven't checked the main jet (not sure where to look) to see if I need to lean it out one notch or if just setting the idle higher will help.

Someone feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, I only rode a 2-smoker for a short while... but it might just be that you're 'lugging' the bike too much. I believe you can 'foul' the plug, if you're not in the power band a lot... 2-smokers LIKE the power band, thats why the clutch control fiep was talking about is SO important!

Sounds like you had one heck of a first ride... don't you feel GREAT, conquering what you did?? :cry::lol::cry: Believe me, keep it up, & in 3 months you'll do the same route and be like 'what WAS all the fuss about, this is NO problem!' :lol::cry:

Oh, and keep up the advil... think you're sore today? Just WAIT until tomorrow! :cry::lol: :lol:

:cry:

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A friend that posts on GOR and TT {occasionally} has a KX100 for his wife's ride. He did some rejetting work and is much happier with how it runs. Maybe your idling problem could be fixed, that would probably make your rides even better! Still, it sounds like you had fun despite the problems!

He said it was running rich from stock, ar sea level. That problem would only get worse as the altitude increases.

Robert :cry:

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Remember, "The Clutch is your FREIND!!!!"

You might 'hurt' the clutch.....after about 5,000 miles, but the odds are slim!!! The motorcycle clutch is different than the automobile clutch, do NOT be afraid to 'feather' the clutch!!!! Besides, even if you do hurt it, after that 5,000 miles, it's a ton EASIER and CHEAPER to replace than your auto clutch!!!

FEATHER, rev, FEATHER........that's what it's there for, and with a two stroke, a BUNCH of Feather, Rev, Feather is the ticket to fun!!!!

Tom

I dumped the clutch 3 or 4 times and bogged once. I had a time hard time keeping the bike idling so anytime someone stopped in front of me, I stalled. ANd then it would take a good 5 or 6 kicks to get going again.

Hills were my nemesis! I would start to go up and then I was afraid I would hit the powerband so I'd let off the gas, and **bonk** stall out. The one time I did hit the powerband, I wheelied up the hill and almost hit a tree!:cry: . Man, talk about a heartattack!

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Also, my plug is black and oily so I'll need to address that issue before next weekend. I haven't checked the main jet (not sure where to look) to see if I need to lean it out one notch or if just setting the idle higher will help.

Someone feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, I only rode a 2-smoker for a short while... but it might just be that you're 'lugging' the bike too much. I believe you can 'foul' the plug, if you're not in the power band a lot... 2-smokers LIKE the power band, thats why the clutch control fiep was talking about is SO important!

Well, your main jet can't be adjusted by notches, but your needle can. (Please correct me if I've mixed these up) Your pilot jet is the one you should be most concerned with; it controls idle to 1/4 throttle, or so. The needle controls 1/4 to 1/2 throttle and the main jet is 1/2 to wide open. Don't forget the air screw; that is kind of like an all-over fine tuning adjustment. That is how jetting was explained to me. So, basically, if that is correct then you don't need to worry about the main jet as much as you do the needle and pilot jets. You can raise or lower the needle to change your jetting, and also adjust the air screw; these are things you can do without buying new jets. If you can't get it where you want it with those two, then it is time to buy different jets.

Two strokes do like the powerband, but it's also possible to jet for lower RPM riding. You can find a happy medium but it won't be perfect. My plugs usually are pretty dark, but they never ever foul so much it won't run. It does get hard to kickstart after a really, really slow, technical section. You can take it for high RPM blasts up and down a fire road or something to clean it out--that helps. Also, revving it quite high a couple of times before you shut it off will help. And if you are traveling slow, pull the clutch in every once in a while and wing the throttle a few times. That might help your plugs stay a little cleaner.

As for jetting, I ride pretty slow so I jetted it fairly lean. It runs just fine--starts easily hot or cold, runs smooth, etc.

As for the rest of it, just keep at it! My transition from XR200 to KTM200 was COMICAL for the bystanders and frustrating for me. But it doesn't last forever and it's fun once you get the whole 2-stroke thing figured out.

Don't know if you do this or not, but I got to be REALLY bad on the XR about not using my rear brake. I relied on compression and the front brake. Now, I am just starting to learn how to brakeslide, etc. So start trying things like that now to avoid bad habits that are hard to break!

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Like L2F said, you plug may look black and sooty because your are not ridding the bike up on the pipe (higher revs). Your jetting may be off too. What jets are you running, and what altitude and temp are you riding in? First off I found my bike runs so much crisper with the hotter plug, so that is what I have stuck with. You really should check your pilot and make sure that it is not too rich. That would make you stall a lot, but so would lugging the bike around. I ride around 1500-3500ft and around 40-75 degrees. I just had to go down one after changing out my air screw. If must have been running rich and I didn't notice because I am always on the clutch and rarely at idle. I dropped it one 42 Piolet and my main is a 138. When I ride above 3000ft, I drop the main to a 135. I have pulled the plug and it looks good. The main jet you can change while the carb is still on the bike by removing the bolt on the bottom of the carb. If you get the motion pro carb kit tool you just insert that up in the bottom and take out the main. If you want to change out the pilot, you need to take off the bowl, which can take a little finese and wiggling. When removing the pilot it is just easier to take the carb off.

One other thing, everybody is talking about using the clutch. This is problably on of the most important things when it comes to a 2 stroke. But don't forget to be in the appropiate gear. If you feel a little boggy, you can use the clutch or downshift and go the same speed at a higher RPM.

Like I said before you will get the hang of things in no time. :cry:

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Thanks for the tips everyone! After reading through them, I think I was probably "lugging" the bike for fear of hitting that powerband :cry:

I'll definitely focus on using the clutch more to keep the revs up. This bike has 6 speeds??! That first gear is looking mighty fine if I need to keep it in the powerband :cry::lol: Geez, I'd have to be going a hundred miles an hour to use that sixth gear! :cry:

Fiep, you nailed it on the head with this description "me hanging on like a flag-waving-in-the-wind with NO control over the beast". I can only imagine myself hanging on for dear life while my legs and feet dangle and flop around in the wind behind me! :lol:

Anyway, can I just clean that spark plug or do I need a new one? Its pretty black so I'm not sure if its worth saving. I'll check the settings once I feel comfortable enough to start the bike again. I swear I can hardly move today! :cry: Now where'd I put that bottle of Advil? :cry:

I'm really looking forward to my next ride on Saturday!

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Get a new plug--they're pretty cheap.

I found Aleve works better for me--after 2 knee surgeries, my docs told me the same thing. Take 2 or 3 of the generic brand of Aleve (naprosen) and you'll feel great.

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Oh bummer, I was afraid of that. The one that's in there is one of those Iridium plugs (BR8EIX). What a waste :cry: Oh well.

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I'll definitely focus on using the clutch more to keep the revs up. This bike has 6 speeds??! That first gear is looking mighty fine if I need to keep it in the powerband :cry: :cry:

Actually, once you get used to the speed, 2nd gear is easier to maintain a steady speed with... 1st gear is mainly to get you going from a dead stop, and is even more 'peaky'. :cry:

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Anyway, can I just clean that spark plug or do I need a new one? Its pretty black so I'm not sure if its worth saving. I'll check the settings once I feel comfortable enough to start the bike again. I swear I can hardly move today! :cry: Now where'd I put that bottle of Advil? :cry:

I'm really looking forward to my next ride on Saturday!

If that iridium is a new plug try and re-use. Just clean it up and stick it back in. Regardless, you should go get yourself some spare plugs. I only seem to need to replace mine twice a year, if that. You may go through more until you start riding in the higher RPMS. I am running the BR9EIX Iridium plug, which is the hotter plug. The KX plugs are not cheap and you have to get them at a bike shop. They run from $7-$10 buck a piece vs. my XR's was only a few bucks. I ordered a bunch through http://www.sparkplugs.com/. They were cheaper, although you pay shipping. If you order a larger quantity it is worth it.

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Anyway, can I just clean that spark plug or do I need a new one? Its pretty black so I'm not sure if its worth saving. I'll check the settings once I feel comfortable enough to start the bike again. I swear I can hardly move today! :cry: Now where'd I put that bottle of Advil? :cry:

I'm really looking forward to my next ride on Saturday!

If that iridium is a new plug try and re-use. Just clean it up and stick it back in. Regardless, you should go get yourself some spare plugs. I only seem to need to replace mine twice a year, if that. You may go through more until you start riding in the higher RPMS. I am running the BR9EIX Iridium plug, which is the hotter plug. . . .

Hmm, I've never messed with the iridium plugs much. However, on sparkplugs.com (thanks for that link--great site) it lists the standard plugs as well as the iridiums. Does your bike REQUIRE it to run correctly, or is it just recommended? I've done really well with the medium grade plug, the EGV or whatever.

However, I think you should check that part number--if it is an NGK part number, than the 9 is actually colder than the 8. I believe that NGK, unlike all the other brands out there, goes backwards and the higher the number, the colder the plug's heat range. A 7 would be the hotter part number.

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wow, you girls check your plugs? i just replace mine every year or so. usually when i replace the top end.

if the bike is jetted too rich, it will often accentuate the sudden hit when the engine gets on the pipe, cuz it doesn't run very cleanly down low. proper jetting should make it somewhat smoother.

you'll be amazed what 20 hrs or so of riding will do for your comfort level. when i first got on my 300exc, i thought it was a monster (coming off a docile 4-stroke), but after a few weeks i was pretty used to it, and now it seems like a very smooth and manageable motor.

mw

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Those plugs are expensive! That one should be fine if it starts and runs. You cannot clean an iridium plug! Get yourself a spare BR8ES or 2 to keep with your tools. To do a proper plug check, you need to have a wide open space you can get up to at least 4th gear wide open throttle for stretch. Pull the clutch and hit the kill switch at the same time and coast to a stop with the engine dead. ALL plugs are going to look black and sooty from idling too long and puting like you are just learning. One more thing, DO NOT use the choke much! Use it to start bone cold, then flip it off and keep it running with the throttle, Blip, Blip, Blip. Run it like this till you cant comfortably keep you hand on the cylinder before taking off on it or you will learn what "Cold Sieze" is all about! :cry:

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Get yourself a spare BR8ES or 2 to keep with your tools.

good idea,

but do not keep it with the tools if you trailride

when riding a smoker I always had a plug on one side the plug spanner on the other taped under the shrouts

Murphy says: if you do not have them with you, you will need them

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