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Woods Technique - Cornering Question

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I'd like to pick up my cornering pace in the woods. I'm not a motocross guy. As I'm getting passed, I've noticed two schools of thought. Some of the faster guys seem to make the trail basically a series of straight lines with really quick runs to the corners and serious braking before entry. Others seem to carry a lot more speed and flow better. They both seem fast. The blast to the corner method seems more tiring to me though. As a general rule, is one technique faster than the other??? I've tried both. I don't blast to the corners well. My natural tendancy is to keep more of a steady pace. However, I'm sacraficing speed in some of the short straights to do this. Any thoughts are greatly appreciated? I ride a lot, but I seem stuck in a rut. It's like I don't know what to try to even practice to get better.

Thanks for any help and, please, be merciful. :cry: :cry:

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blasting to the corner set up for it while braking and blast out. a better brake setup really helps this riding style. the most effective for the $ would be a cr routed braided line for the front and some sort of sintered metal pads f/r,and if you want to go all out wave rotors,maybe even oversize for the front(i've found the stock size wave adequite) you would be amazed at the difference just sintered pads make! :cry:

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I tend to use both styles depending on the terrain. If more open terrain I like to use a smooth flowing style of riding. BUT, when the going gets tight I usually will brake slide around a corner and blast to next corner, braking hard at last moment and then pivot lots of times sliding the rear with brake and then transitioning to power to maintain my slide and exit.

Cher'o,

Dwight :cry:

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i'd also like to add that lately i've started moving around a lot more on the bike. for instance you are approaching a left hand turn, say around a tree: since i won't be able to lean my body with the bike due to the tightness of the terrain, i slide just a little to the outside of the seat in preparation for pushing down on the inside grip to initiate the turn, with maybe a little push on the tank with the outside knee. so the bike leans but i am staying more upright. if it's a wide open turn with a berm, you can stay centered and lean with the bike.

at the same time, i'm looking up the trail for the next turn, and as soon as i clear the tree, start moving my body to the other side of the seat. works for me. the weight transfer seems to enhance traction allowing me to accelerate up the trail faster. wish i could claim the technique, but started doing it after watching db in slo mo. it's subtle, but he is constantly moving around on the bike.

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In my opinion side-to-side movement is a generally a sign of out of control riding. Basically you are trying to regain balance w/o slowing down.

Front to back movement is the way to transfer weight for braking and acceleration. This is a sign that the rider is in control.

I find that as I start to really flow is sections my time braking for turns gets shorter, my throttle comes on much sooner, and I exit the turn with alot more rpm.

I try to exit turns in as high a gear as the engine will pull. I do this because I don't want to have to shift on short or medium short straights between turns.

Down-shifting while setting up for turns can get too busy to stay smoooth.

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Different strokes, but it's probably more subtle than I relate above. Concerning the side to side movement, it's an attempt at maintaining weight on the outside peg, and therefore maximixing traction as the bike flicks right and left. I didn't mean to imply that there is no fore/aft movement, however I do tend to stay more centered these days letting the bike work around the pitch axis.

As far as shifting, being in the right gear before one enters the turn is always a good thing, but having an MX background I don't hesitate to shift whenever the need arrises, I.E. in the air or sliding into a turn trail braking both wheels locked, clutch in while lining up for the next turn.

Having said that, one thing that I had to learn when transitioning to a 4 stroke is shifting less often than with a 2 stroke, and taking advantage of compression braking.

OT: Hmmm. TPS replaced. That's interesting. PM sent.

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I'm not suggesting that people should not move side to side.

We are all learning how to ride and we will need to adjust for the mistakes we make. If you can adjust while on the gas, that is great, but it is best not make the mistake in the first place.

I use the rear brake to slow down and change directions, but I also brake with bike more upright. The tire will have best traction when you are straight up and down. Rocking the bike left and right will reduce the tires effectiveness.

You could also get caught leaning the wrong way when the ground causes a nasty kick.

It seems that to ride quickly you need to ride efficently i.e. doing multiple things at once.

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i would think you need both styles to be the most effective on track you can be. I like to weave the trees and not scub speed if i dont have to. Im usually standing up so rolling on the seat doesnt do me any good. You need to get good and balance on the bike at low and high speeds and be able to know what its gonna do, cause trees arent forgiving. Set up really early for your turn. This is hard to do on some courses but helps out big time. If you concentrate too much on the turn coming up by the time you get to it your not gonna be ready for the next turn. this is where fast accel and slow turns style comes in. If you can get comfortable with timing for turns, when to lean , how far and how much it will do. know how to slide the rear around and use it to steer helps for quick and fast turns. some times overcomensating for turns can help. say if youve got a hard left into a hard right. you actually over turn the left so you can accel more through the right since you will have less turning to do. The only time its really imperative to slow down would be for switchbacks inbetween trees to up hill sections or the like. any time you are completely changing direction in a tight spot it becomes hard to keep your speed so make sure you are in the right gear before the corner and keep the revs up.

good luck

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I'm not suggesting that people should not move side to side.

hmmm

then tell me how to keep my upper body upright in a turn

and tell me why most old-school riders cut the edges of their seat foam

?????????????????

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I read that as he exits turns he rocks the bike side to side.

I think that was because he exited the turn off-balance and/or off-line.

I know that everyone has snapped through a turn, exited full throttle , and was so perfectly positioned on the bike coming out that you didn't move at all. A perfect turn.

Since no one does it perfect every turn, moving side-to-side is needed but not desired.

That was all I was suggesting. Perfect practice makes perfect.

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Front to back movement is the way to transfer weight for braking and acceleration. This is a sign that the rider is in control.

I find that as I start to really flow is sections my time braking for turns gets shorter, my throttle comes on much sooner, and I exit the turn with alot more rpm.

I try to exit turns in as high a gear as the engine will pull. I do this because I don't want to have to shift on short or medium short straights between turns.

Down-shifting while setting up for turns can get too busy to stay smoooth.

Same as the Math Professor, works for me -anyway

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Another thing to increase speed and over-all smoothness is to look ahead and read the corner in an effort to "see" around it. For example, if there is a lot of 2-stroke smoke lingering, you can pretty much count on a fairly steep incline after the corner. If the berm is pretty high, usually it is a sharp corner rather than a sweeper, assuming you can't see around either type of corner. The higher the berm, generally the sharper the corner. Breaking bump mid-way into the turn may indicated some tight trees not very far around the corner.

Good topic. Break sliding wears me out too soon. I leave that for my son. He will get way ahead and stop to wait, then I catch up and I'm not to worn out. He usually bonks first. I opt for a smooth and consistent flow, even though it is not always fastest (read for me--slower!) But then, I am not riding on race-pace mode--hardly ever do at my age. Trees don't move and I need to work on Monday!

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Another thing to increase speed and over-all smoothness is to look ahead and read the corner in an effort to "see" around it. For example, if there is a lot of 2-stroke smoke lingering, you can pretty much count on a fairly steep incline after the corner. If the berm is pretty high, usually it is a sharp corner rather than a sweeper, assuming you can't see around either type of corner. The higher the berm, generally the sharper the corner. Breaking bump mid-way into the turn may indicated some tight trees not very far around the corner.

Good topic. Break sliding wears me out too soon. I leave that for my son. He will get way ahead and stop to wait, then I catch up and I'm not to worn out. He usually bonks first. I opt for a smooth and consistent flow, even though it is not always fastest (read for me--slower!) But then, I am not riding on race-pace mode--hardly ever do at my age. Trees don't move and I need to work on Monday!

Great reply....good ideas! :cry::cry:

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Rudy:

That was some very good stuff regarding reading the terrain.

I never thought of that, but it really makes sense.

You gotta love thinking outside the box. :cry: :cry:

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Adding one to Rudy's list: If you are climbing and you see a turnout, it's an indication of a steeper hill. Riders are coming back down to a turn around for a second run at it.

Your chance (maybe the last) to get on the gas.

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