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Did I start to late?

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Did I start to late to posible become a pro racer if I am 14 9soon 15) and started two years ago? extra I am not the most active rider (I only ride about evry 3 mouths, but I go for 3 days at a time). And what can I do besides ride and work out to get better?

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you started a little bit late if your dreams are to make it to the AMA with a factory yamaha sponsorship.... 3 times in a period of 3 months out riding is not enough practice,,,,, you need to be on your bike everyday improving and improving, going to races, reading techniques about RC and Bubba..... and all the TOP names.... i have a dream of becoming pro but i know its not gonna happen. When off your bike just think about riding and sit on your bike and get a picture in your mind as if your riding... DONT let me put ur dream down the drain.... You might be the next RC

Good luck :cry:

-red rider-

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First of all red ryder is wrong dont listen to him..second of all going pro as in amatuers? or as pro in being a factory rider?? well first off there are lots of pros that started when they were your age. Dont listen to other people just ride with faster people alot and you will get faster. And by the way one of the best ever racers in motocross didnt even start racing till he was 18 believe it or not(Bob Hannah). But he did ride alot starting out as a young child. John Dowd didnt start till he was like 13 or 14 so..just ride alot and trust your gut not other peoples opions. My 2 cents :cry:

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First of all red ryder is wrong dont listen to him..second of all going pro as in amatuers? or as pro in being a factory rider?? well first off there are lots of pros that started when they were your age. Dont listen to other people just ride with faster people alot and you will get faster. And by the way one of the best ever racers in motocross didnt even start racing till he was 18 believe it or not(Bob Hannah). But he did ride alot starting out as a young child. John Dowd didnt start till he was like 13 or 14 so..just ride alot and trust your gut not other peoples opions. My 2 cents :cry:

I think dowdy started later then that..he won a 125 west SX title when he was in his 30's :cry:

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Once every 3 months is not very often. I guess if you can't make it to the ridding areas more often get a moutain bike and ride it all the time. Practice gnarly downhills and use it to get in better condition.

Then when you turn 16 buy a small truck and ride every weekend.

Good luck,

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First off what I have to say is don't race to go pro, race to have fun. Of course you want to do your best and you gotta know what to do to get to that point but I know that I used to think about going pro and trained way too hard and never had fun when riding. Now I've found that I have way more fun on the bike and actually ride better because I don't have so much stress put on myself. I'm 14 as well and would love to race a few nats or supercorsses in a couple years but have fun and play it by ear.

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Did I start to late to.....

:lol:It's never too late for an English lesson! :cry: (sorry couldn't resist)

No, it's not too late. But as you get older life intrudes. You get married or have a job, and your responsibilities dictate that you have to show up and work, so you can get that paycheck, so you can make that house payment (or motorcycle, or truck, or whatever payment).

That is the clock that ticks, and is racing by you right now. If you can get adequate financial support while you're learning, and making a name, and qualifying, then you have plenty of time to get better, faster, stronger on the bike.

At your age, you'll have to ask yourself if your parents are going to support your efforts into your early 20's. Not many people can attend college and also practice enough to race at a national level. So, you'll have to devote all your time to riding, wrenching, etc. while you learn. If it turns out that you don't have the talent, then what? Will your parents (or will you) be able or willing to change your life's direction at that time? What will you do then, and how will you accomplish that?

Even pros (the guys who finish worse than 5th place every week) will have to eventually hang it up and then what? RC will have sponser $$$ and maybe TV analyst offers, and a whole rainbow of opportunities. Chances are, you will be like the 99.9% who won't have those opportunities. Make sure you weigh this carefully, and have a good fall back plan.

You could map out a plan. If I haven't achieved (insert goal), by (insert age), I will quit and do (insert fall bback plan). Until then, I will give all of my free time to practicing, riding, and racing. That way, you'll know if you are on track and have a shot, and you won't dead end yourself as an also-ran at 30 with no prospects.

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I kno this isn't for me but im also 14 and almost 15 been riding since x-mas so about 9 months and i ride every weekend and abuot 4 days a week over the summer. im pretty fast and ride a cr 125 and im starting to race 125 begginer. is it too late for me?? :cry:

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I read in a dirt mag a while back about a pro who started real late.I don't think he even rode a bike till 21 or something but won a championship two years later.I want to say it was Mickey Dymond but I'm not sure.It doesn't matter.If you put your mind to it,stay with it and don't get discouraged by people saying how you're not good enough or too old you can make it.You must ride almost every day and study and practice the correct techniques.Wear some good gear so you stay healthy.You have to have an obsession to win no matter what.That's what makes MX so dangerous.Good luck.

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First of all red ryder is wrong dont listen to him..second of all going pro as in amatuers? or as pro in being a factory rider?? well first off there are lots of pros that started when they were your age. Dont listen to other people just ride with faster people alot and you will get faster. And by the way one of the best ever racers in motocross didnt even start racing till he was 18 believe it or not(Bob Hannah). But he did ride alot starting out as a young child. John Dowd didnt start till he was like 13 or 14 so..just ride alot and trust your gut not other peoples opions. My 2 cents :cry:

still holding that grugde on me huh :cry:.... i wasnt wrong in what i said.... HE CAN BE A PRO if he rides more often... OUT OF ALL HONESTY... who do you know became a pro who went out to ride once every two months?

Maybe later you'll have time to go out and ride more and YOU WILL FOR SURE be a pro if you try your best.... ME saying that the chances are slim to be a factory rider should make you want to ride harder to prove me wrong.... ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN.... i wish you the very best in becoming a pro... Again, like i said, this is just my opinion. You never know what may happen, when u get wheels you can go out and practice every day and IF YOU pour your guts out on the dirt, breaking yourself, no one will be able to stop you....

Good luck man... i wish you the best

-red rider-

:cry:

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What I heard about Mike Brown was he got a bike when he was 13. He got it on a Friday, and started racing Saturday. Then racing every chance he got.

I also got a late start in motocross(got a bike at 14, started riding motocross at 15, 16 now). I dont know if it would be possible this year, but I'd like to try and qualify for 125C at LL. I've got about 3 more weeks, and I can start riding again (broken arm).

On my list of "things to do before I die" I'd like to do a supercross, or maybe more. Going pro, getting sponsored, making a living riding a bike is deffinitely my ultimate dream (assuming that I'm still having fun with this). The chances of that happening are not great. So I figure while I'm still living with my parents, I'll give it all I've got, and ride my hardest. No matter what, I'm deffinitely going to college. Try and keep getting good from there, maybe race one or two indoors, one or two outdoors. I'll see where I stand from there, and evaluate what to do with my life.

Don't get discouraged about it, try your hardest. Be smart about it though, and have a back up plan. :cry:

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I like the way Jeremy McGrath answers that question; if you're going to be good, you're going to be good, if you're not, you're not. Of course if you started at 20 or somewhere around there it WOULD be too late but at 14 or 15 you still have time. However, you better get busy now. I've attached below an article I wrote a year or so ago about goal setting. I hope it helps.

Good luck,

Goal setting: Everyday, Short term, and long term goals.

Goals give a racer something to aim at, something to achieve. They are a way of keeping yourself focused, to know why you’re putting in all the hard work and making the necessary sacrifices. Without goals we would just be motivated by hand to mouth and day to day needs. We’d be like a ship on the vast ocean with no compass or rutter, just being out there blown around by the surface winds never really going anywhere. Do you know people like that in life?

Sure, most people have goals. They at least have some ideas of what they want out of life and these goals keep them going somewhat in the right direction. They could however, get a lot more mileage out of their goals if they would put just a little more time and effort into it, and review and modify them on a regular basis.

The first step is to write all your everyday, short term, and long term goal out. Not many people do this and loose a lot of potential right form the start. People think, I don’t have to write them down, I know what they are. They are missing out on understanding their goals better and making them more real. In the time it takes to watch one program on TV you could have all your goals written out.

It’s best to know your long term goals first. They are the long range, really out there, going to take a lot of time and effort to get. One could be to become the best racer on the planet or it could be to get a factory sponsorship, or win a National Title, or to qualify for a National. Whatever it is, your long term goals are what you ultimately want to achieve in a given area. Once you know this destination point you have to figure out how to get there from here. This is where your short and everyday goals go to work for you. You don’t just all of a sudden, one day, reach these difficult goals. You have to start making small steps in that direction first. Before you become the best rider on the planet you may need to turn pro, get a major sponsor, win some races and so on. These would be your short term goals. And how are you going to acquire these short term goals. It’s not going to happen unless you make it happen. This is where your everyday goals come into play. You’re going to have to train and eat a high performance diet, practice on your bike, maintain your bike, race almost every weekend, work a job that supports your needs. And what are you going to have to sacrifice? You can’t be like one of the regular guys in town and be staying out late, eating fast food, not training, or anything that is going to keep you from putting 100% into your racing efforts. If you’re going to win a National Title or just make a living racing as a pro, you can’t live a normal average lifestyle. You’re going to have to make sacrifices and be much more disciplined. These sacrifices are a big part of your everyday goals. But hey, look on the bright side, if you make it to the top the rewards are well worth the price.

Whatever you do don’t get caught in the trap of living your life just to reach your final destination or your goals. Life’s a journey, not a destination. And one of the most important things to realize is that there is a balance to everything. You have to train but not over train, you have to be motivated but not too motivated, you have to eat right but not be a health freak, you must have a good bike set-up but not freak out when one small thing isn’t perfect, you have to discipline yourself during the week but not to the point that you’re not having any fun and if you don’t do one little thing just right you feel guilty on race day. This delicate balance also applies to reaching your goals. Have fun and enjoy the process. This is a main ingredient, and you can’t get there from here without it.

Mother nature cannot be tricked or cheated, she will give up to you the object of your desires only after you have paid her price. To get to the top in motocross and supercross you have to love the price, love the work itself.

:cry::cry: :cry: :cry::lol::cry::lol:

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Didnt MC start late too? Was racing bicycles before that, right?? I was thinking in his teens??

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Didnt MC start late too? Was racing bicycles before that, right?? I was thinking in his teens??

Yes, MC started racing motocross when he was 14 and he did race BMX before that. From then on MC practily lived on a motorcycle. In other words he loved riding and racing so much that he did it all the time. I can remember one time when he was about 19 he came home from a local race and went out practicing on his supercross track. He just loved to ride. :cry:

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I had a race at hollister hills this weekend 10-3-04 and i got 15 out of 25 in both moto's for my second race ever is that good? (beginner class of course). 125 beginner. i got my bike xmas 03 and been riding for these 10 months and had my cr125 for about 3-4 months.

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