Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

I am curious if it is still possible for me to become a pro??

Recommended Posts

I am just now getting seriously getting into racing, i am 15 turning 16 december 29. I ride on average 7-10 hours a day or more sometimes. I work out at night cause the gym i go to gives you your own key when you join so i can unlock it and go at night or way early in the morning. Lots of people tell me i have tons of skill and think i should try to go pro. I am going over from quads to a yz426f, i have loads of past experiance on bikes. just curious if anyone thinks i can go pro in the next 5 years or so if i attend all races and put my heart and soul into it??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all depends on you. Im 17 and i race inter. Ill be going pro soon hopefully.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dude if you are riding 7-10 hours a day you better pray you go pro. NO JOB, NO SCHOOL, I LIKE IT. I think you have a chance with that kind of persistance. I don't want to sound like my dad, but go to school get an edu-macation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i dont see why not. if you're as bad as people say you are, try hitting up some of the amateur nat's and see if you got game, the sponsors will come to you if you win @ LL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are alot of pro's that started late. Kelly Smith started when he was 15. Mc Grath started at like 14 or 15 and Dowd didnt even start till he was like 19.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I homeschool, I only have to work like an hour a day cause I am just studying for my GED (so far the GED book is really easy for me, but its like a mile thick, lol) and in the afternoon I work on my college course (motorcycle and atv repair), so I am getting all my schooling in. I graduate highschool in January :cry: cant wait and when I turn 18 I am going to get a job in construction and open up a m/c and atv reapair shop and have my mom run it so I can race.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks man, I had no idea they started that late, cause I mean all I am seeing is like James (Bubba) Stewart in MX Rider when he was 9 so I am like freakin out. lol Thanks for all the replies they helped more than you could imagine. BIG confidence booster.

Oh and how does everyone like those Gary Semics videos, do they really help alot??? Because, I am thinking of ordering the MX Conditioning video and Gary Semics Techniques 1,2,and 8.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly I cant afford to race amatuer nationals, I dont have my own truck nor my own drivers license cause I am 15 and I would not be able to make it to all the races across the US because my mom works 5 days a week and my dad cant take my because he is dead, and I have no friends able to get me to the races so I am just going to have to race locally and see if I can get sponsered so I can get to the amatuer national races.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get the whole semics collection if you can, if not, be sure to get the one on corners. MX races are won and lost in the corners. Most everyone out there can go fast in a straight line.

Race and ride when you can and when you turn 16 get a small 2wd pickup that gets good gas milage and start hitting the races. You might consider a van if you going to stay the night at places far away.

You don't want to say "I wish I would have" when you get old, live your dream now.

Good luck,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need money. Get your hair styled, get looking good, and talk to some marketing firm for a sponsor to pay some of the bills. I wouldn't be to picky. Toothpaste, deodorant, heck...toilet paper, "brawny", you need money and showing up at the races with (something everyone there wants and uses) plastered all over your trailer, bike and bod, it might get your foot in the door. Also you better be crazy fast to even get a peek from a factory rep. You have to look good too. Are you marketable?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that I had it made. I just graduated college, took an early retirement, and get to ride almost every day. You got it better than I do, keep it up and enjoy it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

McGrath: "On my sixth bithday he (his dad) gave me my very first bike." Right out of his book "Wide open."

He entered his first motocross race at 15 years old, btw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nofear where are you located,

if you have drive, some talent and determination, you can go pro, talk with some other local riders, see if you can tag along, alot of racers have big hearts, most will be willing to help if you try. and this is coming from someone who just picked up a sponsership (everything but entrace fee's) to race flattrack, bikes the works. if you are willing someone will help.

c10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i live in spring creek nevada, like a mile away from elko. there arent any really good tracks but i can go to glen helen every once and a while

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you said that you will be riding a yz426. there is your first mistake if youa re wanting to go pro. get a 250F. nobody is going to take you seriously if you dont ride the 125 class and the 250 class. go to all the big races you can, and join Sponsorhouse.com that site is a lifesaver, and a career starter. and if youa re rideing for 7 hours a day it is not going to make you faster. it will probibly make you slower acctually. get some schooling and work on corners for 2 hours, and then go do some cross training like cycleing. then come back and work on keepin the bike lower on jumps and corners. Corners are were you win races. anyone can jump a bike, it takes a real man to be able to rail a super deep muddy rut. rock out man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good call mattman. I only raced beginner for a few years (started when I was 34 with my first ride) After a couple of classes with Ricky Johnson (great man, great instructer) I found that we spent more hours braking and turning. That made the difference for me in taking home more plastic.

Did you hear me! MORE PLASTIC!! NOT MONEY. Man what was I thinking. I was having a blast though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I graduate highschool in January :cry: cant wait and when I turn 18 I am going to get a job in construction and open up a m/c and atv reapair shop and have my mom run it so I can race.

Is your Mom taking the ATV repair class with you so she can "run the shop" while you are racing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nofear,

I think going pro has more to do with determination, ability,technique, confidence and desire. I do not race mx and never have. I am a huge fan and ride at my local mx track. I am 39 and really started riding dirt almost two years ago. So I am not an expert in any way with MX.

I do know several non moto pro athletes and retired pros as well as many past Olympians, from different sports. Mostly skiers. Some started very young, some were well into their teens. Most did not begin serious training until they were 15 or a little older. What I mean by training is working on techniques, doing drills, physical endurance and mental challenges. You need a coach or someone to guide your progress. You need to be practicing the right things, ironically most people practice what they are already good at. Most often improvement comes from how you train, as well as how much you train.

MX is an extreme sport. It is evolving like all of the other extremes sports. Guys are going so fast, and so big, and the pros make it look easy. But the danger is there, you want to be a pro and go fast. Great :cry: Find a coach that can make you practice what you need too, and that can help to minimize big crashes. Train like a pro, to be a pro. I lived at a major ski area for ten years, many of my buddies were top local mogul skiers. Several went on to train with a serious club. After only one season of hard core training all of these guys and a couple of girls went from being expert skiers to full on race ready ski machines. Eventually a few went on to the US ski team.

What I would also do is go to a national. Check out Stewart, RC and the rest of the boys, up close and personal. They are scarey fast. To ride like they do, you have to train like they do.

To get started, try going to a riding school and get honest feedback from the experts.

Good Luck and stay healthy. :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going pro is not hard, just sign up at the next race as a pro and you done. Being able to compete is another question that can only be answered through experience. You have to ride with pros first and go from there. When i was an intermediate, i could tear through the pros untill i got up to about the middle of the pack. The top local pros are fast, consistant, determined, and experienced. It takes time to get there but everyone has to start somewhere. Just remember that pros are on a whole different level physically and menatally. :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds like you have the potencial to make it but a lot of people have great potencial, it depends what you do with that potencial.

Following is a goal setting workshop I did for my website (www.gsmxs.com) a year or so ago. It should give you a good understanding on how to get to where you want to be from here. Oh and if you don't do the written assignmemnts you're missing the boat. :cry:

Good luck,

Goal Setting

The power of goal setting. The power of why.

Not having written goals is like sailing the oceans with no compass and ruder to steer your boat. You would just be drifting in any direction that the surface currents and winds would take you, never really going where you wanted to go.

Many, many years ago the Vikings sailed the oceans in search of new lands. They were sometimes mystified and afraid of ice bergs. The movement of the ice bergs was important to the Vikings regarding the safety of their ships. The large bodies of ice confused the Vikings, because they would sometimes drift into the wind despite the surface currents and strong winds. What the Vikings didn’t know was that the ice bergs were driven by a much stronger, longer, more consistent force. The force of the deep under water currents.

Set your goals and be like the strong, steady ice bergs. Don’t be influenced by day to day relations, and temporary trends. Keep your plans, direction, and goals rooted deep in your dreams. Go for what you really want to do in life and drive forward. Don’t get side tracked with other interest and lose valuable momentum. Stay determined and focused with a determination to win which knows no failure.

Don’t get caught in the trap of the law of familiarity. Like you think you know all that, so you don’t have to do it. Fundamentals have to be practiced daily. Repetition is the mother of skill.

How many of you have written goals with a plan for their attainment?

In goal setting, purpose is stronger than outcome. What you become from working toward your goals is most important.

Reasons come first answers come second. Why do you want these goals, then how are you going to make it happen.

----No written Assignment----

Check back next time for Tech Tip # 14 Reaching your goals part 8 (Goal Setting - Creating your future).

Tech Tip # 14

Creating Your future. Goal Setting.

Setting goals is creating a real future. The three main types of goals are; 1. everyday goals, 2. short term goals and 3. long term goals. The everyday day goals take you to your short term goals and your short term goals take you to your long term goals. They are like stepping stones, plateaus that you must reach and overcome. Let’s say you want to be a top pro motocross racer or off-road racer. Even if you just want to be a really good amateur and race well as a hobby, it’s not going to just happen some day by chance, you’re not all of a sudden one day going to make it because you get lucky. Luck is the time when preparation and opportunity meet. When your opportunity comes you have to be prepared for it and that’s not going to just happen by chance. There are many steps along the way that you’re going to have to make. One of the main ingredients in winning races is confidence. Confidence is not something that you can acquire by chance or that someone can give to you. Confidence can only be earner from many days of hard work and dedication and the price of true confidence in this sport is steep.

1. Everyday goals:

What are you’re everyday goals? Do you have them written out? Do you know exactly what you have to be doing everyday in order to reach your goals? In this example of becoming a successful racer your everyday goals could be as follows.

A. Get as much quality practice time in on the bike as possible (at least three days a week). B. Stay on a regular exercise program. C. Eat and drink a healthy diet everyday. D. Stay ahead of bike repairs with a good maintenance schedule. E. Get to bed early and get plenty of sleep on a regular bases. F. Keep a to-do list and stay organized, get priorities done on time, every time.

2. Short term goals;

What do you want to achieve in the near future, within the next one to three months?

A. Learn all the proper riding techniques. B. Being able to ride a 20 minute moto as fast as possible without getting tired. C. Getting my suspension set up better on my bike. D. Placing in the top 3 in my next race. E. Placing in the top 5 in my next series.

Once you accomplish these goals you set new ones and set your sites on those.

3. Long term goals;

These goals are further out in the future, they can be 1 to 5 even 10 years in the future.

A. To perfect all the proper riding techniques and be able to execute them perfectly and automatically. B. Being able to do a 40 minute moto on a very rough track as fast as possible without getting tired. C. Winning all my races and all the series that I enter. D. Getting a factory ride. E. Winning a National Championship. F. Becoming the best motocross or off-road rider ever.

These are just examples. You should really think about it and realistically write down what you really want to do in life, what are your goals and dreams. Writing them out helps because it makes them more real, it makes you more committed to accomplishing them. One motivating factor is to look at the alternative of not reaching your goals. Of course, you should remain a little flexible so if things aren’t going your way you are able to look at the entire picture and reshape your goals. Something even better may come along that you are even more interested in. However, having a set plan and knowing the direction you want to go in is the primary factor in making progress. In order to get there from here, you have to know where there is.

You see, many people waste their valuable time by majoring in minor things and minoring in major things. They end up focusing their attention on and spending their time and energy on things that do not take them towards their goals. They waste so much time that they end up giving up on their goals and dreams. They loose sight of them and don’t even believe in them anymore. They loose confidence and don’t believe they can do it. This is not what you want to happen and it sure is not necessary. All you have to do is make that commitment to what you really want and use all of your time and energy to get it. When you write down all your goals and review them at least once a week it is much easier to chart your path. You will know where to put your time and energy and where not to waste it.

Written assignment:

Make sure you do this simple assignment. Next month we will be using this assignment and going on from there to realize you true goals.

Your assignment is to write out all your everyday goals, short term goals and long term goals. Come on, it’s easy, just do it. Take your note book sit down and start writing them out. Work at it for a while and then take a break, come back to it a little later. You don’t have to finish the entire assignment in one sitting, but work at it consistently and get it done.

PERSEVERANCE- "The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will".

Confidence - " Confidence doesn't come from nowhere. It's a result of something, hours and days and weeks and years of constant work and dedication". (NFL Star Quarterback - Roger Staubach)

Tip # 15

Making your goals become your reality

We’ve been talking about goals for the last two months. Last month you wrote out all your everyday goals, short term goals and long term goals. That’s great and that is defiantly a step in the right direction. Now I’m going to help you get even more motivated and understand what it is really going to take to apply yourself to your goals.

The only way that things really get done is by taking action to do them. Of course, thinking about doing things is the first step and writing down your goals makes you think about them even more and it does make them more real to you. But this is all still just in the thinking stage of things. Thinking, action and then manifestation is the way it becomes a reality. So now that you have these goals written out and you know them better it’s time to take a closer look and understand what it will cost you if you don’t reach these goals or the rewards of reaching them and how, how are you going to reach them. What exactly are you going to have to do and not do in order to reach your goals?

From your assignment last month you have written out all your everyday goals, short term goals and long term goals. Now in order to make these goals your reality for this written assignment you need to:

1. Write out what it will cost you if you don’t apply yourself to reaching your goals in each of the three goal categories.

2. Next, write out all the benefits of applying yourself and reaching your goals in each of the three goals categories.

3. And finally, write out your plan as to how, how are you going to reach these goals in the three goal categories? What are you going to have to do and not do in order to reach these goals? You don’t have to write out these three steps for each individual goal in each category. Just write out your plan as to how you are going to reach these goals in the three goal categories (everyday, short term and long term goals).

Following are some examples from last month’s three goal categories; everyday goals, short term goals and long term goals.

The examples of my everyday goals from last month were;

Everyday goals:

A. Get as much quality practice time in on the bike as possible (at least three days a week). B. Stay on a regular exercise program. C. Eat and drink a healthy diet everyday. D. Stay ahead of bike repairs with a good maintenance schedule. E. Get to bed early and get plenty of sleep on a regular bases. F. Keep a to-do list and stay organized, get priorities done on time, every time.

What it will cost me if I don’t reach these everyday goals;

If I don’t do my everyday goals I won’t develop the skill to race well, I won’t be in good enough shape and I’ll tire out in my races and not place well. If I don’t reach my everyday goals I will be unorganized and I’ll waste a lot of time and energy just trying to find things, my bike will soon become junk and I’ll start having mechanical problems with it. I will forget about important things and not get them done. My bike will be slow and handle poorly which will make it even more difficult to do well. If I’m out of shape and have a pile for a bike, besides not doing well in races, I might even crash and have a major set back with an injury.

The examples of my short term goals from last month were;

Short term goals;

A. Learn all the proper riding techniques. B. Being able to ride a 20 minute moto as fast as possible without getting tired. C. Getting my suspension set up better on my bike. D. Placing in the top 3 in my next race. E. Placing in the top 5 in my next series.

What it will cost me if I don’t reach these short term goals;

If I don’t reach my short term goals I’ll still be in the same place that I’m in now. I won’t be making much, if any; progress and things will keep getting more difficult instead of better. I won’t even be able to ride very long without getting tired; my bike will still be a pile, if not even worst. My results will still suck and I won’t be getting any closer to a good sponsorship. Man oh man, I still won’t even have a descent sponsor.

The examples of my long term goals from last month were;

Long term goals;

A. To perfect all the proper riding techniques and be able to execute them perfectly and automatically. B. Being able to do a 40 minute moto on a very rough track as fast as possible without getting tired. C. Winning all my races and all the series that I enter. D. Getting a factory ride. E. Winning a National Championship. F. Becoming the best motocross or off-road ride ever.

What it will cost me if I don’t reach these long term goals;

If I don’t reach my long term goals I will one day be stricken with the fact that time is running out for me. I will not have made the necessary accomplishments that I should have made and my changes at racing for a living or just being a really good rider will be about over. I will be realizing that I’ve been wasting valuable time and that I’m just not going to make it. Now I will be facing a regular job that I have to do to survive. I better not let this happen.

That was the examples of what it will cost you if you don’t follow through and reach your three goal categories. Now for step two; what are all the benefits if you follow through and reach your goals in the three goal categories?

Following are some examples of the benefits of reaching your everyday goals.

I’ll be feeling the positive effects of making progress. I’ll be riding a lot better, faster and with more control. Riding will be more fun and I’ll be getting better results. I’ll have better equipment and my bikes will be much faster and handle much better. I’ll have a lot more energy and feel better about myself and my racing career. I’ll have more confidence in myself.

Following are some examples of the benefits of reaching your short term goals.

Now many of the positive things will start to multiply. I’ll be riding and racing better and better, my results will keep climbing. I’ll be able to jump the doubles and triples and most all the obstacles on the track. I’ll have more fun riding because I’ll be riding much better and notice my improvements. Factories and after market companies will begin to notice me and start giving me some help. I’ll be able to spend more time on things that I really want to do instead of things that I don’t like to do.

Following are some examples of the benefits of reaching your long term goals.

When I reach my long term goals I will be at the top of the sport. I’ll be in excellent shape and never get tired riding motos and racing. I’ll be getting paid big bucks to race. All I’ll have to do is practice and race; I’ll have the best equipment and have an excellent mechanic. I’ll get to race against the best riders on the best tracks all over the country. I’ll be able to afford the things I need and I won’t have to worry about money. I’ll be living the dream.

Now we’re getting clear on things. The next and final step in this assignment is to write out how you’re going to accomplish these three goal categories? What do you have to do and not do in order to reach your everyday, short term and long term goals?

Following are some examples of what I have to do to reach your everyday goals.

In order to reach my everyday goals I’m going to have to stay focused and not get sidetracked. I’m going to have to set my priorities and work at them everyday. Make sure I plan ahead to have someone to ride with and a good track to practice on. Don’t make any plans that don’t pertain to practice and training. Make friends with people who are going to inspire me to success or at least are not going to hold me back or influence me in the wrong direction. Make sure I get to bed early and eat a nutritious diet in order to have a lot of energy for practice, racing and training. Make the decision and commitment to follow through no matter what and do what I should do in order to stay focused and carry out my everyday goals. Use my will power and just do it. Remind myself of the great opportunity that I have and don’t let it slip away, stay prepared.

Following are some examples of what I have to do to reach my short term goals.

In order for me to reach my short term goals I’m going to have to consistently carryout my everyday goals. I’m going to have to get in a lot better shape. I’m going to stick to my game plan and always practice with a purpose in mind. I’m going to have to know what I’m out there on the track to do, to know what techniques to work on and how to work on them. I’m going to be aware of how my bike is handling and keep learning how to make it better. I’ll make the right contacts with the people who can test with me and keep my bike up to speed. I’ll truly get fast so I can get the results I need in order to keep moving up to the next level and so on. I’ll give up my normal person’s life style and live the life style of a profession athlete.

Following are some examples of what I have to do to reach my long term goals.

I will have to carry out and reach my everyday and short term goals in order to reach my long term goals.

I will prioritize and always put my racing, practice and training first. I will use the majority of my time and energy to make me a better rider and racer. I will not make plans or get sidetracked with things that don’t take me towards my goals. I will always do whatever it takes in order to reach my goals whether I feel like it or not. I will be aware of and work on my attitude everyday. I will maintain a positive outlook and remain an optimist in everything I do. I will stay prepared. I will succeed and I will love the process.

After you read these examples get to work on yours, come on, it’s not that difficult, just do it. I did the examples for you now all you have to do is think about and write out yours. You don’t have to do it all at one time, work at it for awhile then take a break and come back to it and so on until you have it done.

Remember, the first thing you have to control is your mind, your thinking, feelings and emotions, your attitude. This is something not unlike physical exercise; it has to be worked on everyday. Train the mind and the rest will follow. These exercises in goal setting are a great way to start and/or keep it going. Don’t think of excuses and reasons why you don’t have to do this, or why you can’t do it. Think of how you can do it and just do it. Knowing where you want to go and how to get there makes it a lot easier and greatly increases your odds of getting there. The positive mind sees the invisible, feels the intangible and achieves the impossible.

Remember to remain flexible and adjust your goals as time passes on and you gain experience. This is another reason you have to remind yourself of your goals on a consistent bases. When a jet liner leaves New York for Los Angeles they have a goal in mind, to reach L.A. and land safely. They have a plan and know how they are going to get there. They may have to make two stops in order to refuel and so on. Along the way they have to constantly adjust their course because of turbulence, the jet streams and other factors. Likewise are your goals and dreams. Understand what you are challenging yourself to do and how you’re going to make it happen. Motivate yourself by knowing what the consequences are for failing and what the rewards are for succeeding.

Success doesn’t just all of a sudden happen; there are many, many steps along the way. Much like walking across a city, you have to take all those steps to get there.

DREAMS – “Two men look through the same bars (jail), one sees the mud the other the stars.”

DESIRE - "Through some strange and powerful principal of "mental chemistry" which she has never divulged, Nature wraps up in the impulse of strong desire, "that something" which recognizes no such word as "impossible", and accepts no such reality as failure".

(Napoleon Hill)

:cry: :cry: :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×