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Rear Shock Adjustment

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I thought I read somewhere that the large spring in the rear shock was turned up and down mainly to change seat height and it has less bearing on the actual suspension. Can anyone confirm this for me ?

On another note I noticed one of my front shocks is leaking a little. Is it best tended to before it is ridden again or is this a thing that can wait until off season (only a few weeks away up here in Canada in all likelihood) ? How involved is the fix ? Any input would be much appreciated.

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The rear shock spring height (or sag) has a significant effect on your bike. First of all it it is responsible for the ride height. Too much sag and your bike will bottom and feel harsh. Next it controls how much weight is on the front wheel. This is important for 2 reasons. First it controls the weight balance of the bike and it's handling.You adjust the sag to increase or decrease front wheel traction. More sag equals less weight on the front wheel and vise versa. Just like you move forward on the bike when you ride to get better steering sag can do the same. Second it contributes to the balance of the suspension. If you have little sag to help front wheel traction you will also be putting more weight bias on the front forks causing them to feel softer and the rear shock stiffer. Most people adjust sag to alter the handling of their bikes and balance of their suspension. This is why ktm's like alot of sag. It makes the bike way more balanced.

As for the front forks. Depends on what you mean by "a little" If it's just a little visible oil you might just have dirt under your seal. You can remove the dust wiper with a flat screw driver and take a business card or a piece of photo film and slide around between the inner tube and the seal to remove the dirt. Then spray the seal with contact cleaner re-install the dust seal and see if that works.

If However there is visible oil on the axle lug and everytime you move the suspension more oil comes out. I would not recommend riding it. Could you? I guess you could. If you don't mind risking your fork internals. Be careful if you ride it with it leaking. IF you lose a significant amount of oil and park the bike for winter without much oil the shims, springs, and other parts can rust.

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