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chain maintainence

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The owners manual says to remove the chain and soak it in kerosene to clean and lubricate it. I have 2 questions regarding this:

1. Is this necessary, as there is no master link on the chain, I couldn't find one, so would I have to cut it and install one to remove it from the bike.

2. Where can you get kerosene, I went to an outdoor supply store looking for campstove oil/kerosene but the stuff they have there is not to be used for this purpose as it is not kerosene.

Any help/advice would be appreciated, my chain is dirty and needs to be cleaned so what is the best way to clean it.

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You can remove the swing arm to get the chain off, or cut the chain and install a master link.

Most do neither, but some do.

The chain can be cleaned on the bike,, it is a bit messy, but still effective.

Kero can be had at most hardware stores as it is used as a heating fuel.. Some gas stations also carry it, if widely used in the community as a heating fuel.

I personally do not use Kero,,

I use WD-40 on my chains as a cleaning agent, and have for a lot of years. Some will say it seeps in to and dilutes or washes away the injected grease on an o-ring chain. As I have never dissected an o-ring chain in a controlled test,, I do not know if that claim is true or not. I do know, my chains wear out on the outside (link plate wear) before they wear out at the rollers. So for me, WD-40 works just fine.

To each his own.

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Generally the cheaper the kerosene the better for this purpose since it still has more heavy oils in it. The higher grades are processed to remove as much as possible, a plus for using in heaters but a negative when you want to clean chains.

I use kerosene whenever I can and resort to w/d 40 when I don't have any. For me it is not hard to pick up a gallon and keep a container with some in it for cleaning. If I don't remove the chain then I just dip the grunge brush in it and us an oil can to get it on the chain if I'm in a hurry. Most of the time I just remove the rear wheel and let the chain hang in it and rotate the chain around.

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Kerosene = Tiki Torch fuel at Lowe's/Home Depot.

Bought a gallon and put some in a little squeeze type dispenser I got from usplastics.com. Works well.

Squeeze, toothbrush, squeeze, repeat. :cry:

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It's made for bicycles but I use Pedros Oranj Peelz Degreaser. I'm a bicycle mechanic and have always it used on my non-motored vehicles. I use the Dumonde chain lube which seems fairly light but I clean and lube the chain frequently so it works for me. I have 3500 miles on my current chain/sproket combo and they look new with little wear. I've been riding in the dirt all summer. :cry:

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Well last time I did my chain I used kerosene for the first time on it and I was happy with the results.... Time consuming though for a chain. But its not very often I suppose. :cry:

I used a small bit of kerosene and dumped the chain into one of those gallon size water jugs. Then let it sit and do lots of swishy swashin etc. Then I emptied it put more kerosene in and did it again (Lots o dirt).

After all that I let it dry then I put it in a jar and sprayed "Rock Oil" chain lube on it to rejuvenate the chain. That stuff works really well at workin its way into the chain and its pretty tacky. Then I wiped off the excess and called it good. Whenever it needs more lube I have been using Belray which works good for the surface.... till the next cleaning.

Only down side is the rock oil had a very small bit of fling off at the first ride. But you gotta use something to get into those links and penetrate after you kerosene it. It works well at that. :cry: Someone suggested to me once to let the chain soak in a heavy oil after cleaning it to acomplish the same thing. I would think the oil would be a bit messier end result.

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Unless you’re O-ring, X ring. Z-ring or what ever ring chain is worn out,, Soaking it in lube will not get it "inside" the rollers. All your doing is coating the outside components and surfaces of the chain.

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i wash my chain at the car wash.since i wash my bike every time i ride it,the buildup is never a issue.the slight build up comes right off with getting crazy with the wand.i wd-40 the chain while applying it to all the pivots as well.once the bike has dried i apply silkolene pro chain lube.

now for the proof of my method......

the regina chain i have on my 01 is the original chain i put on it when i built the bike in jan 02.it is still like new.the irony is ive been thru the motor multiple times. :cry:

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If running a nonoring kerosene probably a good way to soak and clean, but an orings benefit towards time consumption it's unecessary unless it needs to be real pretty.

So soak it if you'd like , But I ran my stock chain almost 15,000 miles with a non motorcycle lube/cleaning spray. Soaking would have been alot of work with little gain. IMO

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