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Is there any trick to not scratching rims during tire change?

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On my 150 I was frequently changing tires. I used to scratch the hell out of the rims. I lube up the tire, I DO use tire irons, but I always seem to scratch the edges of the rim. Is there any trick to not scratching them?

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Years of practice! I still use the old method of 2 screw drivers. Never had a problem yet with scratched rim.

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Oh jeez, I tried that method more then once, not only did I end up popping the tube EVERY time, but a scratch here or there. :cry:

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Household vinyl siding cut into strips, this is much thinner than the commercial rim savers that are available. Keeps our Black Excells scratch free.

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Just a quick question? Why did you constantly have to change tires on your 150?

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You need some proper tire levers or "spoons" designed for motorcycles. There are several available from m/c dealers or online. Never use a screwdriver or automotive tire levers. Be sure the tire bead is positioned in the center of the rim before inserting the lever. THis will make the job go very easy with little need to prying and subsequent scratching of the rim.

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Household vinyl siding cut into strips, this is much thinner than the commercial rim savers that are available. Keeps our Black Excells scratch free.

Can you expand upon this? What do you do with the vinyl strips?

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The stock tires on the 150 were completely worn after a month or two...I ride a decent amount of hard pack and they just went. I then got D773's because that's all they had in stock, they looked good, and I didn't really know the difference in tires at that time. Those were soft pack tires and I was riding hard pack, those were gone quite soon. After that I went to D756's and those were on the bike when I sold it. But between popping tubes, changing the tires, and rotating them to wear evenly. I did my share of scratches on the rim. I have 2 Motion Pro tire irons that seem pretty small. They are probably only 6-8 inches long. They are made for motorcycle tires, so maybe those are what I need. Has anyone tried taping the tips of the tire irons wtih say...electrical tape or cloth tape? That's what I thought of, but never dared to try it. I would like to hear about this vinyl siding trick though.

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Someone makes things called rim savers. I bought some at my local shop a couple years ago and gave them to my tire Guru. They are nylon, shaped like a "U" to cover the inner and outer lip, and they have a curve to fit the wheel radius. You need two or three. They are good for beating on rims that need straightening as well. Totally keeps your rims scratch free. :cry:

Heres a pic:

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Household vinyl siding cut into strips, this is much thinner than the commercial rim savers that are available. Keeps our Black Excells scratch free.

Can you expand upon this? What do you do with the vinyl strips?

He puts the vinyl strips between the tire iron and the rim when prying the tire on,or off.

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Yes, cut the lower portion of the siding into small strips that will resemble the "rim savers" posted above. I actually purchased some rimsavers, but they are thicker than the siding and you usually have to "finish off" the tire installation without one to get the tire completely over the rim.

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At the last you just use a rubber mallet to beat the bead on. Any marks it leaves simply wipe off. Tricks of the trade. :cry:

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