Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Backing it in

Recommended Posts

When is it just better to go in fast and hold a good line

and when is it better to back it in? I come from a off road background and dont have a real problem with BIN but it just seams to scrub to much speed but then again I see the guys doing it and there lap times are really good. :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great question!! And there are many fast riders that have different styles on this. I will try to keep it simple, Tracks with fast corner speed we slide less, the tighter the corners are the more we back it in. You use the slide to set you up for corner entries, but if you think you scrubing off to much speed you are probably sliding to deep into the corners and yes this will slow you down to much. There is a fine line between sliding and turning. I see many super fast guys that slide to deep and lose time. If you watch the top guys ride I am sure you will see a lot of different styles but look close and you will see them getting off the slide set up for the turn and off the brakes and on the gas early. The problem for most guys just learning to slide is that it is just to much fun doing it. We have many fellow TT'ers who are super fast and can back it in with the best!!!! :cry:

Darrick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok... I may sound like one of those "How do you do a wheelie" guys... But I gatta ask...

Do you use your gears or the rear brake to brake the tire lose? (or both?)

And... How far into the turn do you slide?

And... How do you come out of it without getting tank slap and highsiding? (did this twice my last track day)

Someone needs to step up and do an article on backing it in, with diagrams etc...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is an article in Super Moto Racer Mag. # 3 but it did not help me. I am in the same boat as you. I can not figure it out! I come from a road racing back ground and we try to stay away from all of that but now I am on a tard and want to learn. So far my attempts have not been very successful :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really can't tell you how to do it. I know Derrick can.

It's a combination Front brake, downshift, rear brake and clutch. A lot of things going on at the same time.

Once you figure it out, you don't even have to think about it.

It's the most fun thing I have ever done and the best part of every lap aroung the track.

Don't force it, it will just come and you'll never forget it. :cry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it better to think of it as exceding the grip of the tire and like said there is a lot of factors, leaning the bike, rear breaks another thing i notice is I have a

habit if keeping a slight pressure on the front break.

where I have a worry is the point at the apex where i go from sliding to grip (LOL) @ full lean and turn speed. i always worry that I will loose the front, though this hasnt

happen yet this is whats holding my BIN speed down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it better to think of it as exceding the grip of the tire and like said there is a lot of factors, leaning the bike, rear breaks another thing i notice is I have a

habit if keeping a slight pressure on the front break.

where I have a worry is the point at the apex where i go from sliding to grip (LOL) @ full lean and turn speed. i always worry that I will loose the front, though this hasnt

happen yet this is whats holding my BIN speed down.

You need to use your front brake all the way down to the apex.

Remember your trying to slow down. The rear wheel is secondary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is it the front brake that keeps you from high-siding?

No, high siding is usually the result to loosing grip sliding and then the bike regaining grip and throwing

the rider off the HS. Darrick could answer this better for sure? but I think its less likley to HS when backing a bike in and what my main worry is low sidding (lossing the front wheel)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Backing it in is used to square off the corner - meaning you have the bike pointing much further towards the exit. Basically it allows you to get on the gas quicker and harder if done correctly. Interestingly it also allows you to hold less lean angle for the same given speed on turn entry and up to the apex. It is very much like the effect lighting up the rear has for MotoGP riders when exiting the corner - it tightens the line so you have to lean less for the same arc and therefore you can get even more on the gas.

Faster corners or those that are more open tend to be the ones where backing it in is a waste of time.

Oh yes, Hi! this is my first post - card's behind the bar.

Simon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My biggiest question is are you braking while you are actually in the turn? When I am road racing I do all the braking before the turn otherwise the bike stands up in the turn and really screws things up. The idea of braking in the turn seems kind of strange to me????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a tough thing to put into words. It's like surfing or snow sking, you just have to feel it and be comfortable doing it. If you have a mini bike like an XR-100 or TTR-125, they are GREAT practice tools. Danny Walker's Super-Camp is an excellent school to teach you the proper form and bike control. I went twice to the super-moto school in Delaware. Once would have been enough, but I had such a fun time and learned so much that I went twice. It's worth every penny in my opinion. For the cost of a good exhaust pipe, you get knowledge that will make you a better, smarter and ultimately faster rider.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mean braking up until just before the apex then the answer is yes, for the whole duration of the slide - this is with front brake and some light rear as part of the slide.

Scary thought for any rider but it is actually safer than a road racer trail braking into the corner. This is because when backing it in the front wheel is pointing slightly into the slide. It is far more likely that the front end is lost just after you've come off the brakes and turned the front further into corner than during the slide itself.

I've seen more riders loose the back-end sliding than the front.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SMWRF88

I will def. be at American Supercamp in DE in April. I have already talked to the guys over there and am just waiting for the confirmation for the supermoto camp. If not I will take the dirt camp. I know I will benefit greatly from either one.

I guess I just have to keep practising. I know all of this is hard to put into words. That is one of the reasons why when I read it I am like huh???? haha...

Thanks for the advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×