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When is it necessary to grip the seat?

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Should i be gripping the seat at all times or is it only at certian points in the track like braking points etc.

Thanks!

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Hi Beeks,

We talked about that some in your recent thread about resting weight on the footpegs:

Weighting the Footpegs

Is that not working for you? Like I mentioned in that thread, pretty much the only time I clamp with my knees is when the bars are going to go yank. You'll also grip gently with your knees when you're standing in choppy turns, BTW, I forgot to mention that before.

Clamping hard with your knees a lot is going to wear you out fast, and pull your upper body around a lot as the bike see-saws. At least for me, the heel lock trick keeps me feeling the bike okay, lets me ride with open hands most of the time, and lets the bike pivot much more naturally at the footpegs without me getting thrown forward and back.

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berkeman says it nicely in that thread...

The places where you usually need to use your knees to hold onto the bike are in stuff like whoops or other sharp bumps that try to pull the bars forward with a yank -- instead of pulling with your arms and toasting them, grip with your knees at the instant of the yank, then loosen them again. This absorbs the yank force with your legs, and keeps your arms from getting worn out. The other place where a knee grip helps a LOT is when you transition from standing/braking to sitting into a corner. Control your sit-down motion by squeezing briefly on the tank with your knees, so that the friction controls your sit-down motion (instead of using your arms to control the sit-down). Especially when the corner entry is at the bottom of a hill, this really helps to keep your arms from getting tired.

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Thanks YZ250F. I'm definitely not the fastest guy out there (yet), but man, there are such important tricks to going fast and lasting a long time. Er, I mean on an MX track of course. :cry:

Funny story -- two weekends ago, Red Sticker opened at Hollister here in NorCal. Hollister is farther away from the air-polluted local dirtbike tracks near San Jose that open in November, so it was fun to get back to riding more trails instead of the exclusive MX riding that we've been doing all summer.

The problem was that at the MX tracks we usually do something like 20 minute practice motos, with 20 minute rests in between. But trail riding is going back to wearing a CamelBak and riding for an hour plus, on trails that have plenty of whoops and accel/decel transitions.

Jeeze, a couple of hours into that, I started cramping up good in my clutch finger and my thighs. And after all of my posts about how learning to balance on the pegs will set you free. What a dummy!

But the good news was that as soon as I started cramping up, I started thinking more about opening my hands after every turn, being sure to row back for braking into every turn, and relaxing my legs after every stand-up. It was way-cool when the cramps went away within 5 minutes of paying attention to my riding better. Sweet skiing uphill on the High Road! :cry:

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Its gripping the seat(when standing) on the straights i'm struggling with. Should i just be leaning into it or what?

The guy who i bought my bike off raced competitivly in sx so when i open the throttle and the powerband comes in it hits hard... thats whats causing me problems :cry:

Cheers!

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you may not be standing correctly in the first place if the bike is tossing you back on pinning it. When you pin it you need to be in an aggressive attack stance with your head over the bars.

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