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Do I Really Want A Dual Sport???

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I am going to buy a new(probably used) bike sometime in the next month. My last bike was a GSXR 600 which is very sadly trashed now, by a friend, not me. I can not hold back enough to stay out of trouble on a sport bike and I am realizing how lucky I am to not be dead or in jail by now. I need something that I can play off road on yet can get me from point A to point B everyday. Also, point A and point B are seperated by about 30 miles of interstate. It needs to be fast enough to keep me safe and satisfied on the interstate and durable enough to take the beating that I know I will give it under any off-road circumstances. I really want a motard. But which one? New? Convert a used dirt bike myself? Buy one already converted? I am lost but I need to ride something soon before I go crazy.

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Depending on where you are it might better to buy a dirt bike then dual sport it. Some states are tough to license dirt bikes unless the bike came from the factory street legal. It also depends on how much dirt or road riding you will be doing. Most factory DS bikes are better on the road than the dirt. If you are going to be doing alot of offroad I would go with the xr650r. :cry:

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Which state you live in can dictate if you need to buy a factory dual-sport or a convert a dirt bike. My preference is to convert a dirt bike as I would like to have a dirt bike I can ride on the streets.

The Honda XR650R might be a good choice.

Do a search here and in the dual-sport forum for suggested bikes.

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I have spent a lot of time looking at ktm's. So far I have found the 625 smc, 625 sxc, 525 sxc and exc, and all the model numbers are starting to look the same to me. Can anyone translate some of this?? Remember, I am leaning towards a street legal motard. More street than dirt but capable of dirt when needed.

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Have you ridden much in the dirt before? IMO, you need a dirtbike for the dirt, and a streetbike for the street. The dual-sport that I've ridden (a friend's DRZ-400S) was very scary in the dirt. Way too heavy with a high center of gravity. And I really don't like the idea of anything other than a streetbike on the street. What do you do when you need all the traction of barely-DOT tires for a swerve to avoid a cage?

Is there any way that you can get both? Get a used dirtbike like a good MX bike, and a used sportbike for the street. You'll be much happier, IMO, and safer on both the street and the dirt. My two cents. :cry:

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I have spent a lot of time looking at ktm's. So far I have found the 625 smc, 625 sxc, 525 sxc and exc, and all the model numbers are starting to look the same to me. Can anyone translate some of this?? Remember, I am leaning towards a street legal motard. More street than dirt but capable of dirt when needed.

Other than the Adventure 950 and 640, I can't help on the KTM.

But I have ridden a Suzuki DR-350s for nearly 50,000 miles on the street.

Street-legal knobbies would be slightly spooky, but the tires that the dualsport bikes come with aren't all that bad on the street. Note: my other bikes have been sport-touring bikes (Concours, BMW R100s, BMW R11rs), so they don't have all-out sport rubber either.

True that the semi-knobs they come with aren't the stickiest in dirt or on pavement, but the thing is that the bikes are so light on the street that it doesn't matter much - they don't stress the tires. My DR-350s is the most nimble streetbike I've ever owned, and as nimble on pavement as anything I've ever ridden. In a MSF ERC class, my little DR was quicker through a slalom than any of the big bikes, and could stop just as well as they could.

Hoping to do a track day on my DR sometime this summer, and I may just put a set of street tires on it and call it good enough.

In dirt, if it's dry the stock tires aren't bad. But wet, or sandy, or anything else, and you realize they sure aren't knobbies.

Suzuki is coming out with a motard-style bike based on the DRz-400, but with wide rims and sporty rubber. Might be what you're looking for.

Or, you can get street rubber in 18" and 21" sizes. Just not as sticky as all-out sportbike rubber.

Some guys that are really into riding DS bikes hard on street and dirt buy a second set of rims, and keep street rubber on one set and dirt rubber on the other.

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Oh, and my DR-350s has spent most of its life on Interstates comumting. This AM it was 94 miles from SO's home to work in 50F and light rain on I-75, leaving her place at 545a.

A Corbin seat keeps it comfy.

Stock dirtbike seats are awful on pavement, used to be like flossing with a foam 2x4 for 90 miles...

Could use more power, as it's pretty much WFO to keep up with traffic. But with 50,000 miles on it, the engine is tired. Going to rebuild engine this winter. Not bigger, just fresher.

Am also told that the DRz-400 has much more power, but a much narrower seat. Corbin makes a more comfy seat for those, too.

My normal 30 mile comumte on rural un-crowded 4-lanes at moderate speeds gives me 60 MPG time and again. Sometimes more.

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Is keeping two sets of wheels an option to keep in mind if I wanted to try to have a motard but also be able to get dirty? Then I could just put the knobbies on when I want to hit the dirt.

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I just realized that you already answered my rim swapping question. I think I am going to get a ktm 625 or ktm 525 and buy a conversion kit and motard rims and just hold onto the knobbies for the hardcore offroading. Now I am wondering about brakes and engine wear. Motards need the oversized discs for street use but you don't want that offroad. Any suggestions??? And how well does the engine of a dual sport hold up on the interstate? Is it easy to wear them out???

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If your looking more to street than dirt then I'd look at a Honda XRL 650, many cheap and easy mods available and proven reliability, while still fun for the milder offroad stuff. If you want to go alittle more offroad??, then the DRZ400S is the pick, (just my opinion). Either way I hope you have fun!!. And don't forget safety gear!!!!. :cry:

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I love my DRZ400s, It's to tall and too heavy, But it's just a matter of getting use to it.

If you live in a state that allow's you to convert, I'ed go that rout. My borther in law's KTM 450 with kit ROCK'S! It's 6 speed trans. keep's the gearing nice at low speed's and still alows a higher top end than my DRZ. Top to bottem the KTM is a better bike and wieghts at least 35 lbs. less. I run Dunlop 606's as they are D.O.T. aproved and they stick to the pavement quite fine, Just SLOW down if it's wet! I think they stick to the pavement just as well as the trailwing's that came with the bike and are way better in the dirt.

I often comute to work on my DRZ. my hwy cruise speed is 75 mlp. At that speed the front end feel's a tad loose(nothing a steering dampner would'nt fix)but I've been comuting so often that I don't even notice it any more.

It's just a matter of getting use to your bike, wich ever one you pick :cry:

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I ride my DR350 about 20 minutes to work everyday and I ride it on the local trails on the weekend, the DR and DRZ's are excellent compromise bikes that can do a little of everything. The new KTM's are a lot of fun too, the 525 is much lighter and more modern compared to the 625. The major advantage to converting a KTM is the easiness of getting it plated compared with other brands.

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The DRZ400 is tall and heavy, but I ride 100% dirt now, and I can go almost anywhere. Once I was used to it, it became a non-issue. Great torque, but if you ride a lot off-road, I'd change the sprockets because it is geared more for the street. Seat sucks, but as someone mentioned Corbin has a seat for it. $250. I love my DRZ and have no regrets about buying it.

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I had a DR400 and it was a great on/off bike. Mine was heavily modified but it was still better on the street than WR450 I replaced it with.

Stiffen up the suspension and toss the street tires and you'll do fine. Its a very reliable bike.

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how hard would it be to title the husky? I live in GA and I am not really familiar with the laws concerning dirt bikes or motards.

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Sooooooooo. What's involved in getting that thing street legal?

Will it do 80 comfortably?

(Not trying to hijack the thread but search on dualsporting that bike turned up nill for me).

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Sooooooooo. What's involved in getting that thing street legal?

Will it do 80 comfortably?

(Not trying to hijack the thread but search on dualsporting that bike turned up nill for me).

I don't know much about it other than its a D*** good looking bike. :cry:

Motard is big in Europe and just getting started in USA.

Its pretty outrageous. These things take a different approach to road racing. They actually slide the rear end around turns, ON ASPHALT, with these things, then do some racing on dirt ... all in the same race. And they look cool too. :cry:

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